Death Was the Other Woman: A Mystery [NOOK Book]

Overview


As the lawlessness of Prohibition pushes against the desperation of the Depression, there are two ways to make a living in Los Angeles: join the criminals or collar them. Kitty Pangborn has chosen the crime-fighters, becoming secretary to Dexter J. Theroux, one of the hard-drinking, tough-talking PIs who pepper the city's stew. But after Dex takes an assignment from Rita Heppelwaite, the mistress of Harrison Dempsey, one of L.A.'s shadiest--and richest--businessmen, Kitty isn't so sure what side of the law she's...
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Death Was the Other Woman: A Mystery

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Overview


As the lawlessness of Prohibition pushes against the desperation of the Depression, there are two ways to make a living in Los Angeles: join the criminals or collar them. Kitty Pangborn has chosen the crime-fighters, becoming secretary to Dexter J. Theroux, one of the hard-drinking, tough-talking PIs who pepper the city's stew. But after Dex takes an assignment from Rita Heppelwaite, the mistress of Harrison Dempsey, one of L.A.'s shadiest--and richest--businessmen, Kitty isn't so sure what side of the law she's on. Rita suspects Dempsey has been stepping out and asks Dex to tail him. It's an easy enough task, but Dex's morning stroll with Johnnie Walker would make it tough for him to trail his own shadow. Kitty insists she go along for the ride, keeping her boss--and hopefully her salary--safe. However, she's about to realize that there's something far more unpleasant than a three-timing husband at the end of this trail, and that there's more at risk than her paycheck. Richly satisfying and stylishly gritty, Death Was the Other Woman gives a brand-new twist to the hard-boiled style, revealing that while veteran PIs like Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe spent their time slugging scotch and wooing women, it may well have been the Girl Fridays of the world who really cracked the cases.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429955799
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 1/8/2008
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • File size: 324 KB

Meet the Author


LINDA L. RICHARDS is the editor and cofounder of January magazine (www.januarymagazine.com) and a regular contributor to The Rap Sheet (therapsheet.blogspot.com). Mad Money, her first work of long fiction, was nominated for the Arthur Ellis Award for best first novel. Death Was the Other Woman is her hardcover debut. She lives near Vancouver.
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Read an Excerpt


Chapter 1
HE’S DRESSED WELL, the dying man. Sharply, one would say. He’s wearing a good suit. Dark, and of a wool so fine it would feel soft to the touch. The suit has a pale pinstripe; it’s barely discernible. And he’s wearing the suit well—he wore it well—except for the dying part.
He’s standing there, his lifeblood draining from him, the look on his face showing surprise as much as horror. He hadn’t planned on dying today. Had, in fact, planned on being the one doing the killing. Killing is part of his job. Not dying. There’s not enough money in L.A.—or the world for that matter—to get a man to give up his life as easily as that.
The man is standing. I can see him as clearly as if I were there, though of course I was not. But I understand things now. Things I had no hope of understanding at the time. I can re-create them in my mind and know what the details mean.
His hat is fashionable, well shaped, well made, and for the moment, it’s worn at a good angle. His features are as well cut as his suit. Dark like the suit as well. He’d be handsome if he weren’t presently concerned about the end he can see so clearly.
Another man is there, similarly dressed, but the look on his face is different. No surprise. No pain. He’s in control. He’s always in control. The gun in his hand tells that story.
The woman is barely in the room, but she doesn’t look away. That shocks me somehow. She shouldn’t watch. Why would she watch? What profit will her witness bring?
She’s exquisite. That shocks me as well. Her shoulders are broad and smooth. Her legs long and well defined. Her hair, her features, soft and lovely. And the look on her face . . . that shocks me most of all. Not pleasure, no. But not distress either. To her, this scene is correct. The only proper conclusion to a story she helped write.
But all of this is later. Much later. It makes sense to me now. But then? Not then. At the time I found him, it made no sense at all.  Copyright © 2007 by Linda L. Richards. All rights reserved.

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