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Debating Gender In Early Modern England, 1500-1700

Overview

This book explores the construction of gender ideology in early modern England through an analysis of the querelle des femmes —the debate about the relationship between the sexes that originated on the continent during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and developed in England into the Swetnam controversy. The volume contextualizes the debate in terms of its continental antecedents and elite manuscript circulation in England, then moves to consider popular culture and printed texts, its effects on women’s ...

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Overview

This book explores the construction of gender ideology in early modern England through an analysis of the querelle des femmes —the debate about the relationship between the sexes that originated on the continent during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and developed in England into the Swetnam controversy. The volume contextualizes the debate in terms of its continental antecedents and elite manuscript circulation in England, then moves to consider popular culture and printed texts, its effects on women’s writing and the developing discourse on gender, and concludes by examining the ramifications of the debate during the Civil War and Restoration. Essays focus on the implications of the gender debate for women writers and their literary relations, cultural ideology and the family, and political discourse and ideas of nationhood.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...this volume establishes a threshold of excellence that will become the ideal for later scholarship to emulate."—A.C. Labriola, Choice
"This is a rich and unusual collection of essays. The book differs strikingly from most collections of essays because it not only studies past debates focused on questions of gender but also stages—in an intelligent, well-controlled, but refreshingly sharp way—a modern critical activity of debating gender. The editors’ introduction is superb, as are their strategies for organizing this set of highly original and cogently-argued essays." — Margaret Ferguson, University of California at Davis
Booknews
Presents 11 essays exploring the construction of gender ideology in early modern England through an analysis of the <-->a debate about the relationship between the sexes that originated on the continent during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and developed in England into the Swetnam controversy. Essays focus on the implications of the gender debate for women writers and their literary relations, cultural ideology and the family, and political discourse and ideas of nationhood. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312294571
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 8/3/2002
  • Series: Early Modern Cultural Studies Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Cristina Malcolmson is Professor of English at Bates College. Her previous books include Heart-Work: George Herbert and the Protestant Ethic and Longman Critical Readers: Renaissance Poetry.

Mihoko Suzuki Professor of English at the University of Miami and the author of Metamorphoses of Helen: Authority, Difference, and the Epic and Subordinate Subjects: Gender, the Political Nation, and Literary Form in England, 1588-1688.

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Table of Contents

Introduction—Cristina Malcolmson & Mihoko Suzuki
Manuscript and Debate
• Christine de Pizan’s “City of Ladies” in Early Modern England—Cristina Malcolmson
• Anne Southwell and the Pamphlet Debate: The Politics of Gender, Class, and Manuscript—Elizabeth Clarke
Print, Pedagogy, and the Question of Class
• Muzzling the Competition: Rachel Speght and the Economics of Print—Lisa Schnell
• Women’s Popular Culture? Teaching the Swetnam Controversy—Melinda Gough
Women’s Subjectivity in Male-Authored Texts
• The Broadside Ballad and the Woman’s Voice—Sandra Clark
• “Weele have a Wench shall be our Poet”: Samuel Rowlands’ Gossip Pamphlets—Susan Gushee O’Malley
Generic Departures: Figuring the Maternal Body, Constructing Female Culture
• The Mat(t)er of Death: The Defense of Eve and the Female Ars Moriendi —Patricia Phillippy
• “Hens should be served first”: Prioritizing Maternal Production in the Early Modern Pamphlet Debate—Naomi Miller
• Cross-Dressed Women and Natural Mothers: “Boundary Panic” in Hic Mulier — Rachel Trubowitz
Politics, State, and the Nation
• Monstrous Births and the Body Politic: Women’s Political Writings and the Strange and Wonderful Travail of Mistress Parliament and Mris Rump—Katherine Romack
• Elizabeth, Gender, and the Political Imaginary of Seventeenth-Century England—Mihoko Suzuki

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