Debating Sexual Correctness: Pornography, Sexual Harassment, Date Rape, and the Politics of Sexual Equality

Debating Sexual Correctness: Pornography, Sexual Harassment, Date Rape, and the Politics of Sexual Equality

by Adele Stan
     
 

A glance here, a flirtation there, a moment of  misunderstanding. Have the new rules of feminist  politics gone too far? Since Katie Riophe's book  The Morning After helped spark a  national debate over the politics of date rape, the  media has focused on controversial sexual behavior  of all kinds.

See more details below

Overview

A glance here, a flirtation there, a moment of  misunderstanding. Have the new rules of feminist  politics gone too far? Since Katie Riophe's book  The Morning After helped spark a  national debate over the politics of date rape, the  media has focused on controversial sexual behavior  of all kinds. Proponents of what has come to be  called sexual correctness contend that we live in a  culture where date rape, pornography, and sexual  harassment are simply facts of life that demand a  new sexual standard. Opponents argue that these  claims are born out of a victim mentality they see  as pervasive in the modern feminist movement that  threatens to rob women of the gains of sexual  freedom. As the successfull Dell title  Debating PC did in 1992, Debating  Sexual Correctness brings together some of  the best known and most important voices in this  debate. From the editorial pages of magazines as  diverse as The New Republic and  Glamour, The New York  Times and Playboy, the  country's most thoughtful social critics define or  debunk this very controversial notion of sexual  correctness. Katie Roiphe, Camille Paglia, Naomi  Wolf, Andrea Dworkin, Catherine MacKinnon, and Susan  Faludi are only a few of the writers in this  provocative anthology that looks at a highly charged  debate that has encompassed a nation.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Culling from publications ranging from Ladies' Home Journal to the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography and the New York Times, Stan has done an outstanding job finding pieces that look at the sexual correctness debate from every angle and writing style. There is no apparent bias here. Self-confessed ``card-carrying feminist'' Lisa Palac describes how she went from being an ``anti-porn feminist'' to making pornographic films. Former Ms. editor Robin Morgan sees connections between the porn industry, ``anti-Semitic tracts'' and the Ku Klux Klan. In a sometimes annoyingly abstruse piece, bell hooks writes that ``heterosexual women have not unlearned a heterosexist-based `eroticism' that constructs desire in such a way that many of us can only respond erotically to male behavior that has already been coded as masculine within the sexist framework.'' For those who prefer their arguments phrased more simply, Stan offers essays by George F. Will, Mortimer Zuckerman and the Village Voice's Ellen Willis, who warns that ``if feminists define pornography per se as the enemy, the result will be to make a lot of women ashamed of their sexual feelings and afraid to be honest about them.'' No one's ever going to win this debate, but studying the arguments helps readers see clearly the issues in the often deeply emotional exchange. (Mar.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385313841
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/02/1995
Pages:
340
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.75(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >