DEC Is Dead, Long Live DEC: The Lasting Legacy of Digital Equipment Corporation [NOOK Book]

Overview

Edgar Schein is one of the founders of the organization development field, a widely respected scholar and a bestselling author

? Shows how the unique culture of DEC was responsible both for its early rise and for its ultimate downfall-a real-life classical tragedy

? ...
See more details below
DEC Is Dead, Long Live DEC: The Lasting Legacy of Digital Equipment Corporation

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$22.50 List Price

Overview

Edgar Schein is one of the founders of the organization development field, a widely respected scholar and a bestselling author

• Shows how the unique culture of DEC was responsible both for its early rise and for its ultimate downfall-a real-life classical tragedy

• Schein was a high-level consultant to DEC throughout its history, with unparalleled access to the company's story as it unfolded over the course of four decades


DEC Is Dead, Long Live DEC tells the 40-year story of the creation, demise, and enduring legacy of one of the pioneering companies of the computer age. Digital Equipment Corporation created the minicomputer, networking, the concept of distributed computing, speech recognition, and other major innovations. It was the number two computer maker behind IBM. Yet it ultimately failed as a business and was sold to Compaq Corporation. What happened?

Edgar Schein consulted to DEC throughout its history and so had unparalleled access to all the major players, and an inside view of all the major events. He shows how the unique organizational culture established by DEC's founder, Ken Olsen, gave the company important competitive advantages in its early years, but later became a hindrance and ultimately led to the company's downfall. Schein, Kampas, DeLisi, and Sonduck explain in detail how a particular culture can become so embedded that an organization is unable to adapt to changing circumstances even though it sees the need very clearly.

The essential elements of DEC's culture are still visible in many other organizations today, and most former employees are so positive about their days at DEC that they attempt to reproduce its culture in their current work situations. In the era of post-dot.com meltdown, raging debate about companies "built to last" vs. "built to sell," and more entrepreneurial startups than ever, the rise and fall of DEC is the ultimate case study.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781605093024
  • Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/9/2004
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 317
  • Sales rank: 419,779
  • File size: 3 MB

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Preface
Acknowledgments
1 Purpose and Overview 1
2 Three Developmental Streams: A Model for Deciphering and Lessons of the DEC Story 16
3 Ken Olsen, the Scientist-Engineer 33
4 Ken Olsen, the Leader and Manager 47
5 Ken Olsen, the Salesman-Marketer 71
6 DEC's Cultural Paradigm 80
7 DEC's "Other" Legacy: The Development of Leaders 90
8 DEC's Impact on the Evolution of Organization Development 113
9 The Impact of Changing Technology 131
10 The Impact of Success, Growth, and Age 146
11 Learning Efforts Reveal Cultural Strengths and Rigidities 168
12 The Turbulent 1980s: Peaking but Weakening 195
13 The Beginning of the End: Ken Olsen's Final Efforts to Save DEC 222
14 Obvious Lessons and Subtle Lessons 243
15 The Lasting Legacy of Digital Equipment Corporation 255
App. A DEC's Technical Legacy 269
App. B DEC Manufacturing: Contributions Made and Lessons Learned 273
App. C DEC, the First Knowledge Organization 280
App. D Digital: The Strategic Failure 283
App. E What Happened? A Postscript 292
References 303
Index 307
About the Author 319
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2003

    A Jewel

    I waited patiently for the release of this book. I anticipated a historical exposé al la ¿The Frozen Water Trade¿ or ¿ Engines of Enterprise¿, what I got was a jewel about business that rivals Christensen or Collins. I would recommend it to both the business historical researcher and the manger seeking to analyze his or her company¿s DNA. A good read for both alumni and non-DECies.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)