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DECAY
     

DECAY

4.3 3
by Nathan Troi Anderson
 

Decay can possess the drama of a landslide or the intimacy of cracked skin. In Decay, photographers Nathan Troi Anderson and J.K. Putnam share how decay looks to them through their lenses. Shot in color and black & white, with their cameras trained on a wide array of subjects, decay begins to take shape, framed by written insights about how they

Overview

Decay can possess the drama of a landslide or the intimacy of cracked skin. In Decay, photographers Nathan Troi Anderson and J.K. Putnam share how decay looks to them through their lenses. Shot in color and black & white, with their cameras trained on a wide array of subjects, decay begins to take shape, framed by written insights about how they perceive this natural phenomenon.

In a distinctly MBP twist, Decay also doubles as a pattern book, providing readers with 50 high-resolution, royalty-free patterns of decay that can be used for any number of graphic design applications.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780979554674
Publisher:
Batty, Mark Publisher
Publication date:
11/15/2008
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.90(d)

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DECAY 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Grady1GH More than 1 year ago
The thought of creating a photographic monologue on the theme of 'decay' may seem jarring to some, but in the graceful hands of photographers Nathan Troi Anderson and J.K. Putnam the natural wasting of things becomes almost symphonic in the vast survey of matter growing old in this magnificent book. Perhaps the best summary of this project is in the concluding statement by author Majeed after perusing this collection of images: 'Decay is just another senseless borderline between the whisper of ghosts of past days and the roar of painfully recovered memories. It is the heavy boots of time and the luster of countless tiny eyes of rats.'

In images of both black and white and color photography, Anderson and Putnam pause before corroded abandoned cars, piles of rusted chains, deserted buildings, cemeteries, great stretches of wasted soil and sand, places once created and inhabited by man but now forgotten like old shoes left behind the scurrying path towards the new, and bones and soon to become fossils of wildlife, spent flower pods, and the beauty of age as it changes the stature and surface of trees and walls and rust stained monuments of a better time.

Reading and spending time with the magnificent photographs of the measures of DECAY elicits sadness, memories, pity, and eventually a respect for the passage of time and the footprints left for us to remember. This is a humbling book, one that places life in a different perspective. Highly recommended. Grady Harp
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RobertClark More than 1 year ago
I certainly did not when I first took a peek inside. Once I got past the cover though, I was immersed in the excellent photography by Nathan Troi Anderson and J.K. Putnam. Not only that, but it made me more aware of the world around me and the stuff that is decaying within it. I live in rural Georgia and I see a lot of houses that have been abandoned and have been engulfed by vegetation. I hadn't really thought about how those houses have decayed, but once I took a look at some of the pictures within Decay, I was reminded of them. The photography is stunning. The detail to which both photographers envelope the reader with is astonishing. This is a great book for anyone interested in the world around them. There were a few things that I didn't like about the book, but they were minor. There is no text beyond a forward from each of the photographers and a afterword by Majeed. There are no descriptions or titles of the pictures. This wasn't really a big deal unless the picture was really tight on something and I couldn't tell what it was I was looking at. A few wide shots would have also been helpful in those instances. Other than that, the book is magnificent and a joy to look at. Additionally, there is a CD that has royalty versions of 50 of the pictures that one can use for graphic designs.