Decay Time - A Wall Street Murder and Morality Tale

Decay Time - A Wall Street Murder and Morality Tale

4.6 3
by Scott Stevenson
     
 

Not just another book about Wall Street , Decay Time offers a fresh perspective - the human perspective - about Wall St. In part drawing on the social commentary tradition of Tom Wolfe and financial thriller style of John Grisham, this novel will entertain and educate.The reader can relate - on some level - to the drama that unfolds with the characters. It speaks to…  See more details below

Overview

Not just another book about Wall Street , Decay Time offers a fresh perspective - the human perspective - about Wall St. In part drawing on the social commentary tradition of Tom Wolfe and financial thriller style of John Grisham, this novel will entertain and educate.The reader can relate - on some level - to the drama that unfolds with the characters. It speaks to the struggle of the human condition itself.
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Back Cover: October 2008, New York City: A dead man, sprawled in a pool of blood, is found in the penthouse suite of an opulent midtown Manhattan hotel. Who is he? Was he murdered or was it suicide, and would it make yet another headline about the financial meltdown rocking Wall Street? Chip Smith, veteran investment banker at Smyth Johnston, was looking forward to a comfortable retirement until he found himself an unwilling player in a changing Wall Street scene. A new culture of money, power, and control dominated by a few in the banking business contributed to the financial crash. When the grisly hotel death investigation lands on Smyth Johnston's trading floor, insights into this new culture-behavior, business practices, shadow banking, lifestyle-all come into play. Decay Time is a story about people, not products, and illuminates the world of the Wall Street trading floor before, during, and following the 2008 financial crisis. This morality tale invites the question as to whether behavior of the new Wall Street culture was really that different than what exists in other high-profile professions, or even in everyday life.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016709154
Publisher:
Ice Cold Crime LLC
Publication date:
06/03/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
326
File size:
241 KB

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Meet the Author

Scott Stevenson worked in New York and London for several global investment banks as well as boutique finance firms over the course of his 20-year career. A graduate of Kent School, he holds a BA from Vanderbilt University and an MBA (Finance) from the University of Chicago. He left the banking world shortly before the financial crisis and now lives in Tennessee with his wife and two children.

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Decay Time - A Wall Street Murder and Morality Tale 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The author was there everyday dealing with the bankers, traders, and sales desks. He makes the story interesting with a well developed story of murder. The first few chapters are a little slow, just getting all the financial terms sorted out. Then you reach a point where you do not want to put the book down. This book was excellent for a lay person, to help understand how Wall Street melted down in Oct. 2008.
jbeebs18 More than 1 year ago
This is the most realistic fiction book I have ever read, offering a true introspective look into the world of Wall Street, but also our society as a whole as it slowly decays. Through the use of a fictitious crime and characters the author was able to write a compelling and interesting read as well as comment on the overall society of Wall St. with its pros and cons. Another great aspect of this book is its educational value in understanding the daily dealings on Wall St. (even with a Glossary in the back giving definitions to various financial terms) from a true knowledgeable veteran of "the Street." Further, the author's continual yet subtle defense of his former profession is admirable and his explanation of how the "meltdown" came to fruition is spot on--perhaps he should think about writing a non-fiction book about his former life. All in all this is a great easy read even with dense financial background (the glossary does help if you're not familiar with financial jargon) and has a very interesting plot twist that you will just have to read for yourself!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago