Deception: The Untold Story of East-West Espionage Today

Overview

From the capture of Sidney Reilly, the "Ace of Spies," by Lenin's Bolsheviks in 1925 to the deportation from the U.S. of Anna Chapman, the "Redhead Under the Bed," in 2010, Kremlin and Western spymasters have battled for supremacy for nearly a century. Edward Lucas persuasively demonstrates that "for most of the past decades, the Kremlin's spymasters have run rings around their Western adversaries"—and continue to do so well after the Cold War ended. Lucas reveals unknown triumphs and disasters of Western ...

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Deception: The Untold Story of East-West Espionage Today

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Overview

From the capture of Sidney Reilly, the "Ace of Spies," by Lenin's Bolsheviks in 1925 to the deportation from the U.S. of Anna Chapman, the "Redhead Under the Bed," in 2010, Kremlin and Western spymasters have battled for supremacy for nearly a century. Edward Lucas persuasively demonstrates that "for most of the past decades, the Kremlin's spymasters have run rings around their Western adversaries"—and continue to do so well after the Cold War ended. Lucas reveals unknown triumphs and disasters of Western intelligence, providing the background for the new world of industrial and political espionage. Once the threat from Moscow was international communism; now it comes from the siloviki, Russia's ruthless "men of power." "The outcome," argues Lucas, "will determine whether the West brings Russia toward its standards of liberty, legality, and cooperation, or whether Russia will shape the West's future as we accommodate (or even adopt) the authoritarian crony capitalism that is the Moscow regime's hallmark."

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Mr. Romney's smug critics might laugh a bit less once they read Deception, Edward Lucas's riveting follow-up to his prescient2008 book on Russia…. Mr. Lucas's account of his jailhouse interview with [Herman] Simm is one of the highlights of Deception, as is his meticulous reconstruction of the way the SVR recruited, ran and ultimately abandoned the Estonian. One depressing conclusion from reading Deception is that Russians are much better than their Western counterparts at the spy business. Another is that, even now, the West doesn't much seem to care that its secrets are being pilfered by a regime that wishes us ill…. Anyone who imagines that Mr. Obama's ‘reset’ has done much to change that picture should read this sobering book.”—Bret Stephens, The Wall Street Journal

 

“Lucas's account is a masterful achievement, blending first-class reporting with the flare of John le Carré and Daniel Silva.”—C.C. Lovett, CHOICE

Kirkus Reviews
A senior editor at the Economist demonstrates that the Russian secret police state is alive and well and watching the West. In a deeply researched though occasionally murky work, Lucas (The New Cold War: Putin's Russia and the Threat to the West, 2008) tracks the historical tentacles of East Bloc spying as well as its most recent infiltrations in the West. In the damning series of early chapters, the author slams Vladimir Putin's "pirate state," a regime mired in corruption, for flagrant disregard of the law--one example: the 2009 death in custody of Hermitage Capital Management tax lawyer Sergei Magnitsky. Lucas then concentrates on the espionage history of the Baltic states, "an ideal base for anti-communist activities." He writes that he was fascinated as a youth by spy literature and a crumbling Eastern Europe and "studied unfashionable languages such as Polish, and practiced them by befriending bitter old émigrés in the dusty clubs and offices of west London." In order to gain knowledge, influence and power from the West, the Soviets have to steal secrets; they do so by employing innumerable "new illegals" who have moved to the West from Soviet-bloc countries after the close of the Cold War. The author focuses mainly on Anna Chapman and her colleagues. Many of the most effective "spooks" succeed by their very blandness and ability to blend into a diverse society like the United States, writes Lucas. He looks at the uneven success of Western spying in the East and closes with a fascinating behind-bars interview with an Estonian official who was informing for the KGB. An urgent call for the West to shake off complacency and protect itself from being duped.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781620403099
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 12/17/2013
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 447,556
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Edward Lucas is a senior editor at the Economist. He has been covering Eastern Europe since 1986, with postings in Berlin, Moscow, Prague, Vienna, and the Baltic states. He is married to the columnist Cristina Odone. He is the author of The New Cold War (2008), which has been published in more than 15 languages. He lives in London.

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