The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire

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ity, that their sovereign should graciously consent to accept this feeble but voluntary testimony of their loyalty and gratitude." A people elated by pride or soured by discontent are seldom qualified to form a just estimate of ...
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The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
ity, that their sovereign should graciously consent to accept this feeble but voluntary testimony of their loyalty and gratitude." A people elated by pride or soured by discontent are seldom qualified to form a just estimate of their actual situation. The subjects of Constantine were incapable of discerning the decline of genius and manly virtue, which so far degraded them below the dignity of their ancestors; but they could feel and lament the rage of tyranny, the relaxation of discipline, and the increase of taxes. The impartial historian, who acknowledges the justice of their complaints, will observe some favorable circumstances which tended to alleviate the misery of their condition. The threatening tempest of Barbarians, which so soon subverted the foundations of Roman greatness, was still repelled, or suspended, on the frontiers. The arts of luxury and literature were cultivated, and the elegant pleasures of society were enjoyed, by the inhabitants of a considerable portion of the globe. The forms, the pomp, and the expense of the civil administration contributed to restrain the irregular license of the soldiers; and although the laws were violated by power, or perverted by subtlety, the sage principles of the Roman jurisprudence preserved a sense of order and equity unknown to the despotic governments of the East. The rights of mankind might derive some protection from religion and philosophy; and the name of freedom, which could no longer alarm, might sometimes admonish, the successors of Augustus that they did not reign over a nation of Slaves or Barbarians.1" 18 Cod. Theod. 1. xii. tit. xiii. The senators were supposed to be exempt from the Aufam Coronarium; but the Auri Obiatio, which was required at their hands, was precisely of the same nature. '1 The great T...

This first volume covers the last two hundred years of the Roman Empire leading up to its collapse.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781172024926
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 10/8/2010
  • Pages: 836
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 1.66 (d)

Meet the Author

Hans-Friedrich Mueller is the William D. Williams Professor of Classics at Union College in Schenectady, New York, and the author of Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus.

Daniel J. Boorstin, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and Librarian of Congress emeritus, is the author of many books, including The Creators and The Discoverers.

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ity, that their sovereign should graciously consent to accept this feeble but voluntary testimony of their loyalty and gratitude." A people elated by pride or soured by discontent are seldom qualified to form a just estimate of their actual situation. The subjects of Constantine were incapable of discerning the decline of genius and manly virtue, which so far degraded them below the dignity of their ancestors; but they could feel and lament the rage of tyranny, the relaxation of discipline, and the increase of taxes. The impartial historian, who acknowledges the justice of their complaints, will observe some favorable circumstances which tended to alleviate the misery of their condition. The threatening tempest of Barbarians, which so soon subverted the foundations of Roman greatness, was still repelled, or suspended, on the frontiers. The arts of luxury and literature were cultivated, and the elegant pleasures of society were enjoyed, by the inhabitants of a considerable portion of the globe. The forms, the pomp, and the expense of the civil administration contributed to restrain the irregular license of the soldiers; and although the laws were violated by power, or perverted by subtlety, the sage principles of the Roman jurisprudence preserved a sense of order and equity unknown to the despotic governments of the East. The rights of mankind might derive some protection from religion and philosophy; and the name of freedom, which could no longer alarm, might sometimes admonish, the successors of Augustus that they did not reign over a nation of Slaves or Barbarians.1" 18 Cod. Theod. 1. xii. tit. xiii. The senators were supposed to be exempt from the Aufam Coronarium; but the AuriObiatio, which was required at their hands, was precisely of the same nature. '1 The great T...
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
List of Maps and Illustrations
Introduction
Critical Foreword
The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Preface of the Author 3
1 The Extent of the Empire in the Age of the Antonines 11
2 Of the Internal Prosperity of the Roman Empire in the Age of the Antonines 19
3 The Constitution in the Age of the Antonines 38
4 The Cruelty, Follies, and Murder of Commodus 58
5 Sale of the Empire to Didius Julianus 70
6 Death of Severus, Tyranny of Caracalla, Usurpation of Macrinus 83
7 Tyranny of Maximin, Rebellion, Civil Wars, Death of Maximin 104
8 State of Persia and Restoration of the Monarchy 125
9 State of Germany Until the Barbarians 133
10 Emperors Decius, Gallus, Aemilianus, Valerian, and Gallienus 143
11 Reign of Claudius, Defeat of the Goths 164
12 Reigns of Tacitus, Probus, Carus, and His Sons 179
13 Reign of Diocletian and His Three Associates 195
14 Six Emperors at the Same Time, Reunion of the Empire 213
15 Progress of the Christian Religion 237
16 Conduct Towards the Christians, from Nero to Constantine 276
17 Foundation of Constantinople 317
18 Character of Constantine and His Sons 344
19 Constantius Sole Emperor 359
20 Conversion of Constantine 376
21 Persecution of Heresy, State of the Church 401
22 Julian Declared Emperor 425
23 Reign of Julian 436
24 The Retreat and Death of Julian 454
25 Reigns of Jovian and Valentinian, Division of the Empire 466
26 Progress of the Huns 490
27 Civil Wars, Reign of Theodosius 509
28 Destruction of Paganism 522
29 Division of Roman Empire Between Sons of Theodosius 540
30 Revolt of the Goths 546
31 Invasion of Italy, Occupation of Territories by Barbarians 563
32 Emperors Arcadius, Eutropius, Theodosius II 578
33 Conquest of Africa by the Vandals 594
34 Attila 604
35 Invasion by Attila 610
36 Total Extinction of the Western Empire 620
37 Conversion of the Barbarians to Christianity 643
38 Reign of Clovis 659
39 Gothic Kingdom of Italy 691
40 Reign of Justinian 699
41 Conquests of Justinian, Character of Belisarius 725
42 State of the Barbaric World 736
43 Last Victory and Death of Belisarius, Death of Justinian 747
44 Idea of the Roman Jurisprudence 762
45 State of Italy Under the Lombards 788
46 Troubles in Persia 800
47 Ecclesiastical Discord 815
48 Succession and Characters of the Greek Emperors 855
49 Conquest of Italy by the Franks 869
50 Description of Arabia and Its Inhabitants 893
51 Conquests by the Arabs 944
52 More Conquests by the Arabs 961
53 Fate of the Eastern Empire 982
54 Origin and Doctrine of the Paulicians 1003
55 The Bulgarians, the Hungarians, and the Russians 1012
56 The Saracens, the Franks, and the Normans 1020
57 The Turks 1029
58 The First Crusade 1047
59 The Crusades 1075
60 The Fourth Crusade 1094
61 Partition of the Empire by the French and Venetians 1104
62 Greek Emperors of Nice and Constantinople 1108
63 Civil Wars and the Ruin of the Greek Empire 1123
64 Moguls, Ottoman Turks 1136
65 Timour or Tamerlane 1153
66 Union of the Greek and Latin Churches 1169
67 Schism of the Greeks and Latins 1187
68 Reign of Mohammed the Second, Extinction of Eastern Empire 1197
69 State of Rome from the Twelfth Century 1219
70 Final Settlement of the Ecclesiastical State 1232
71 Prospect of the Ruins of Rome in the Fifteenth Century 1243
Table of Roman Emperors 1253
A Note on the Illustrations 1259
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 4, 2011

    Garbled crap

    Unreadable due to the poorly scanned nature of this book. Lots of odd special characters embedded through out the text. Don't even bother downloading this.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2012

    Poorly done

    too many garbage characters. for all practical purposes unreadable

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2010

    bad digital conversion

    I was looking forward to reading Gibbons. I downloaded two books (the only two I could find) of the series. Often, with the free books, it depends on how the digital conversion process was done whether the book makes sense. In this case, there were too many nonsense letters and words throughout the text. It made it difficult to follow. I put one book in my archive to save space, the other I am still decoding.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2000

    An excellent edition.

    Although it's best to read Gibbon entire this abridgment is the next best thing for the busy student or the lazy reader. Because so much new information about the formation of Islam and events from Byzantine history have been discovered in the two hundred years since Gibbon wrote his masterwork not much is missed anyway from the later half of the book. A pleasure.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2013

    Bad scan

    Avoid

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2011

    Distortion

    I have just read this book and have come to the conclusion that Gibbon was, without doubt, one of the most anti-catholic authors in history. His prominence as a so-called neutral observer of historical events can only be attributed to the England of his time-ready-made to adopt an anti-papist tone. His name provided legitimacy to all those generations who shared that view. It is of zero solace to me that a continuing number of apologists merely state he just got it wrong, which he did. What a deformed intellect.



    england

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 17, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent, authoritative read

    Had it been unabridged, I would have given it five stars. But, still, the best single work in my 60+ collection. Lots of lessons for us (meaning Americans) today...

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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