Decolonizing International Health: India and Southeast Asia, 1930-65 [NOOK Book]

Overview

In the middle decades of the twentieth century, Asia was at the heart of international efforts to create a new utopia: a world free from disease. At the unexplored boundary between international history, South Asian history, and the history of medicine, this book tells the story of public health in Asia during an era of upheaval, from the late colonial period to the 1960s. While focusing on India, the book suggests that public health was a pan-Asian, even global, enterprise from the 1930s. Examining the grand ...
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Decolonizing International Health: India and Southeast Asia, 1930-65

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Overview

In the middle decades of the twentieth century, Asia was at the heart of international efforts to create a new utopia: a world free from disease. At the unexplored boundary between international history, South Asian history, and the history of medicine, this book tells the story of public health in Asia during an era of upheaval, from the late colonial period to the 1960s. While focusing on India, the book suggests that public health was a pan-Asian, even global, enterprise from the 1930s. Examining the grand ambitions for a post-colonial world free from disease, the book suggests that fundamental problems - political, economic and intellectual - beset the project from the start. Throughout, the work examines the scope and the limitations of medical power, and the relationship of colonial to postcolonial public health. Drawing on material from archives and libraries on three continents, the book contributes to debates on nationalism, internationalism and science in the age of decolonization.

About the Author:
Sunil S. Amrith teaches History at Birkbeck College, University of London

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Decolonizing International Health is as impressive in the material it presents as in the argument it unfolds. This excellent study of internationalization and the politics of health deserves a wide and appreciative readership.” — David Arnold, Jourbanal of Contemporary History
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Product Details

Meet the Author

SUNIL AMRITH is a research fellow at Trinity College, University of Cambridge.

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Table of Contents


List of Tables and Figures     ix
Acknowledgements     x
List of Abbreviations     xiii
Introduction     1
The problem     4
The argument     11
Depression and the Internationalization of Public Health     21
The limits of colonial medicine     22
The internationalization of public health     26
Two visions of rural hygiene     29
Bandung, 1937     36
The 'modernist' challenge     42
Conclusion     46
War and the Rise of Disease Control     47
DDT and disease control     48
Building expertise     50
Planning for the health of the world     56
A new international health organization     63
Conclusion: The ghosts of Bengal     69
The Political Culture of International Health     72
Health and the United Nations     73
Envisioning Asia's health     76
Crisis and sovereignty     79
Public health and the Cold War     83
The birth of technical assistance     85
Rights and technologies of health     87
The argument for public health     90
Conclusion     98
Building A New Utopia     99
Projects and policies     100
Health and nationalism     103
A postcolonial discourse?     106
Journeys to health     108
Seeds of doubt     116
The Technopolitics of Public Health     121
Human and nonhuman obstacles     122
Poverty and politics     127
The return of community     130
Rationality and resistance     135
'A form of quackery'     137
Conclusion: the ambiguities of success     146
The Limits of Disease Control     149
Curing tuberculosis in Madras and Bangalore     150
Problems of policy     156
Dangerous journeys     161
The end of eradication     165
Eradication and evolution     170
The triumph of population control     171
Conclusion: dispersion and 'medical pluralism'     175
Conclusion     179
The effects of health policy     185
Faith and doubt     187
Enduring Utopias     190
Notes     192
Bibliography     231
Index     255
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