Deep and Dark and Dangerous: A Ghost Story

( 758 )

Overview

Just before summer begins, 13-year-old Ali finds an odd photograph in the attic. She knows the two children in it are her mother, Claire, and her aunt Dulcie. But who?s the third person, the one who?s been torn out of the picture?

Ali figures she?ll find out while she?s vacationing in Maine with Dulcie and her four-year-old daughter, Emma, in the house where Ali?s mother?s family used to spend summers. All hopes for relaxation are quashed shortly after their arrival, though, ...

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Overview

Just before summer begins, 13-year-old Ali finds an odd photograph in the attic. She knows the two children in it are her mother, Claire, and her aunt Dulcie. But who’s the third person, the one who’s been torn out of the picture?

Ali figures she’ll find out while she’s vacationing in Maine with Dulcie and her four-year-old daughter, Emma, in the house where Ali’s mother’s family used to spend summers. All hopes for relaxation are quashed shortly after their arrival, though, when the girls meet Sissy, a kid who’s mean and spiteful and a bad influence on Emma.

Strangest of all, Sissy keeps talking about a girl named Teresa who drowned under mysterious circumstances back when Claire and Dulcie were kids, and whose body was never found. At first Ali thinks Sissy’s just trying to scare her with a ghost story, but soon she discovers the real reason why Sissy is so angry. . . . Mary Downing Hahn is at her chilling best in this new supernatural tale that’s certain to send shivers down her readers’ spines.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Signature spooky Hahn sends appropriate shivers up the reader's spine ... satisfyingly chilly." —Kirkus Reviews

"Hahn offers another eerie, suspenseful ghost story filled with family secrets." —Booklist, ALA

"Classic mystery elements ... add to the suspense and keep the well-plotted story moving along to a satisfying conclusion." —School Library Journal

"A compact and approachable shiveriness ... an easygoing vacation read." —Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

School Library Journal

Gr 4-7 - Thirteen-year-old Ali is excited to be spending the summer with her Aunt Dulcie, an artist, and her four-year-old cousin, Emma, in the Maine lakeside cottage where her aunt and mother spent their childhood summers. But why is Ali's mother so terrified to let her go? Why did the sisters' annual sojourns there stop so abruptly 30 years earlier? And what is the meaning of Ali's recurring dream in which, while walking along the shore of Sycamore Lake, she meets a young girl who points to three girls in a canoe and admonishes, "you must do something about this?" Ali soon discovers that Teresa, her mother's and aunt's playmate, had disappeared and was presumed drowned when their grandfather's empty canoe washed up on shore. When a strange girl calling herself Sissy shows up at the cottage and lures Emma into defiant and dangerous behavior, Ali finally realizes who she is. Hahn weaves into the story some classic mystery elements such as a torn photograph, a waterlogged doll, dense fog, and an empty grave, all of which add to the suspense and keep the well-plotted story moving along to a satisfying conclusion.-Marie Orlando, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
Twelve-year-old Ali is excited by the prospect of spending the summer at Sycamore Lake, babysitting her four-year-old cousin Emma while her Aunt Dulcie paints at the newly renovated, long-deserted family cottage. But who is the neighbor girl "Sissy," who wedges herself like a thorn between the two girls? Who is "Teresa," the girl torn out of a family photograph, and who all the town seems to know about? Why does Ali's mother refuse to come to the cabin, and why do Dulcie's paintings suddenly take a dark and watery tone? Signature spooky Hahn sends appropriate shivers up the reader's spine. If Ali's insights into Sissy's psychological problems are surprisingly mature, they're necessary to render the reader's delightful fright into a satisfyingly chilly but calm resolution. Not terribly surprising, but it does the trick. (Fiction. 9-13)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547076454
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 8/4/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 187
  • Sales rank: 45,434
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary Downing Hahn , a former children’s librarian, is the award-winning author of many popular ghost stories, including Deep and Dark and Dangerous and The Old Willis Place. An avid reader, traveler, and all-around arts lover, Ms. Hahn lives in Columbia, Maryland, with her two cats, Oscar and Rufus.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

One rainy Saturday in March, I opened a box of books Mom had brought home from Grandmother’s house. Although Grandmother had been dead for five years, no one had unpacked any of the boxes. They’d been sitting in the attic collecting dust, their contents a mystery. Hoping to find something to read, I started pulling out books—Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Misty of Chincoteague, and at least a dozen Nancy Drew mysteries. At thirteen, I’d long since outgrown Carolyn Keene’s plots, but I opened one at random, The Bungalow Mystery, and began flipping the pages, laughing at the corny descriptions: “Nancy, blue eyed, and with reddish glints in her blonde hair,” “Helen Corning, dark-haired and petite.” The two girls were in a small motorboat on a lake, a storm was coming, and soon they were in big trouble. Just as I was actually getting interested in the plot, I turned a page and found a real-life mystery: a torn photograph.
   In faded shades of yellow and green, Mom’s older sister, Dulcie, grinned into the camera, her teeth big in her narrow face, her hair a tangled mop of tawny curls. Next to her, Mom looked off to the side, her long straight hair drawn back in a ponytail, eyes downcast, unsmiling, clearly unhappy. Dulcie was about eleven, I guessed, and Mom nine or ten. Behind the girls was water—a lake, I assumed. Pressed against Dulcie’s other side, I could make out an arm, a shoulder, and a few strands of long hair, just enough for me to know it was a girl. The rest of her had been torn away. I turned the photo over, hoping to find the girl’s name written on the back.
   There was Grandmother’s neat, schoolteacherly handwriting: “Gull Cottage, 1977. Dulcie, Claire, and T—.” Like her face, the rest of the girl’s name was missing.
   Alone in the attic, I stared at the arm and shoulder. T . . . Tanya, Tonia, Traci, Terri. So many T names to choose from. Which was hers?
   Putting the photo back in the book, I ran downstairs to ask Mom about Gull Cottage, the lake, and the girl. I found her in the kitchen chopping onions for the vegetable casserole she was fixing for dinner. Standing there, head down, she wore the same expression caught in the photograph. Not surprising. She always looked sad, even when she wasn’t.
   I waved the photograph. “Look what I found—a picture of you and Dulcie at a lake somewhere. And another girl—” Mom snatched the photograph, her face suddenly flushed. “Where did you get this?” She acted as if I’d been rummaging through her purse, her bureau drawers, the medicine cabinet, looking for secrets.
   I backed away, startled by her reaction. “It fell out of your old book.” I held up The Bungalow Mystery.
   “It was in one of those boxes you brought back from Grandmother’s house.
   Look, here’s your name.” I pointed to “Claire Thornton, 1977,” written in a childish scrawl on the inside cover. Mom stared at the photograph as if I hadn’t spoken. “I was sure I’d thrown this away.” “Who’s the girl sitting beside Dulcie?” I asked, unable to restrain my curiosity.
   “Me,” Mom said without raising her eyes. “No, I mean on the other side, where it’s ripped.” I pointed. “See her arm and her shoulder? On the back Grandmother wrote T, but the rest of her name was on the torn part.” “I don’t remember another girl.” Mom gripped the photo and shook her head.
   “At the lake, it was always Dulcie and me, just Dulcie and me. Nobody else.” At that moment, Dad came through the kitchen door and set a grocery bag on the counter. “Salad stuff,” he said.
   “They didn’t have field greens, so I got baby spinach.” “Fine,” Mom said.
   “What are you looking at?” Reaching over Mom’s shoulder, he took the photo.
   “Little Claire and little Dulcie,” he said with a smile. “What a cute pair you were. Too bad the picture’s torn—and the color’s so awful.” Mom reached for the photo, but Dad wasn’t finished with it. “This must have been taken in Maine,” he said. “At your cottage.” “Yes.” She reached for the picture again.
   “Hey, look at this.” Dad handed her the photo. “There’s another girl sitting next to Dulcie. See her arm? Who was she?” “This picture was taken thirty years ago,” she said sharply. “I have no idea who that girl was.” Slipping the photo into her pocket, Mom went to the kitchen window and gazed at the backyard, which was just beginning to show green after the winter. With her back to us, she said, “Soon it’ll be time to mulch the garden.” It was her way of ending the conversation, but Dad chose to ignore the hint. “Your mom and aunt spent their vacations at Sycamore Lake when they were little,” he told mee. “They still own Gull Cottage, but neither one of them has gone there since they were kids.” “Why not?” I asked. “A cottage on a lake . . . I’d love to see it.” “Don’t be ridiculous,” Mom said, her back still turned. “The place has probably fallen to pieces by now.” “Why not drive up and take a look this summer?” Dad asked her. “Ali would love Maine—great hiking, swimming, canoeing, and fishing. Lobster, clams, blueberries. We haven’t had a real vacation for years.” Mom spun around to face us, her body tense, her voice shrill. “I hated going there when I was little. The lake was cold and deep and scary, and the shore was so stony, it hurt my feet. It rained for weeks straight. Thunder, lightning, wind, fog. The gnats and mosquitoes were vicious. Dulcie and I fought all the time. I never want to see Gull Cottage again. And neither does Dulcie.” “Oh, come on, Claire,” Dad said, laughing, “it couldn’t have been that bad.” “You don’t know anything about it.” Pressing her fingers to her temples, a sure sign of a headache, she left the room and ran upstairs. A second later, the bedroom door slammed shut.
   I turned to Dad, frustrated. “What’s the matter with Mom now?” “Go easy on her, Ali. You know how easily she gets upset.” He sighed and headed toward the stairs. “Don’t you have a math test tomorrow?” Alone in the kitchen, I opened my textbook and stared at a page of algebra problems. Go easy on your mother, don’t upset her, she can’t handle it. How often had I heard that? My mother was fragile. She worried, she cried easily, sometimes she stayed in bed for days with migraine headaches. From the room overhead I could hear the drone of my parents’ voices. Mom’s voice rose sharp and tearful. “I’ve told you before, I don’t want to talk about it.” Dad mumbled something. I closed my algebra book and retreated to the family room. With the TV on, I couldn’t hear them arguing, but even a rerun of Law and Order couldn’t keep me from thinking about the photo. I certainly hadn’t meant to start a scene—I just wanted to know who “T” was.

I never saw the photo again. No one mentioned Sycamore Lake or Gull Cottage.
   But the more we didn’t talk about it, the more I thought about it. Who was “T”? Why didn’t Mom remember her? If Grandmother had still been alive, I swear I would’ve called her and asked who “T” was.
   I thought about calling Dulcie and asking her, but if Mom saw the number on the phone bill, she’d want to know why I’d called my aunt and what we’d talked about. Mom had “issues with Dulcie”—her words. They couldn’t be together for more than a few hours without arguing.
   Politics, child raising, marriage—they didn’t agree on anything. Maybe because I couldn’t talk to anyone about the photo, I began dreaming about “T” and the lake. Week after week, the same dream, over and over and over again. I’m walking along the shore of Sycamore Lake in a thick fog. I see a girl coming toward me. I can’t make out her face, but somehow I know it’s “T.” She seems to know me, too. She says, “You’d better do something about this.” She points at three girls in a canoe, paddling out onto the lake. One is my mother, one is Dulcie, and I think the third girl is “T.” But how can that be? Isn’t she standing a few feet away? No, she’s gone. The canoe vanishes into the fog. That’s when I always woke up. Scared, shivering—the way people feel when they say, “Someone’s walking on my grave.” I wanted to tell Mom about the dream, but I knew it would upset her. Although Dad didn’t agree, it seemed to me she’d been more nervous and anxious since I’d shown her the photograph. She started seeing her therapist again, not once but twice a week. Her headaches came more frequently, and she spent days lying on the couch reading poetry, mainly Emily Dickinson—not a good choice in my opinion for a depressed person.
   Dickinson’s poems were full of things I didn’t quite understand but frightened me. Her mind was haunted, I thought, by death and sorrow and uncertainty.
   Sometimes I suspected that’s why Mom liked Dickinson—they were kindred spirits.

Except for my dream and Mom’s days on the couch, life went on pretty much as usual. Dad taught his math classes at the university, graded exams, gave lectures, and complained about lazy students and boring faculty meetings—standard stuff. I got involved in painting scenery for the school play and doing things with my friends. As the weather warmed, Mom cheered up a bit and went to work in her flower garden, mulching, transplanting, choosing new plants at the nursery—the best therapy, she claimed.
   And then Dulcie paid us an unexpected visit and threw everything off track.

   Copyright © 2007 by Mary Downing Hahn.
   Reprinted by permission of Clarion Books / Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 758 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(620)

4 Star

(83)

3 Star

(26)

2 Star

(8)

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(21)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 760 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2008

    AMAZING!!!!

    This is my favorite book ever. My friend started reading it and she said it was amazing so i bought it and i was hooked right away. i finished it in one day! i can't wait to read more of her books[=

    54 out of 57 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 17, 2008

    My 9 year old daughter LOVES IT!!!

    My daughter likes scary stories so when we went to her school's book fair I picked this book for her. This is the first real ghost story that she read and she loved it. I read it first to see if it's age appropriate and I loved it too. Now she's begging me to get her more books by Mary Downing Hahn. Today I purchased "The doll in the garden". Can't wait to read it myself :)

    35 out of 40 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2008

    AAA-mazing

    I looked at this book at my school library. I was fascinated when I picked it up because the cover was spooky and the back of the book just inerested me and I wanted to read more. So I checked it out and I read it and I could not stop reading it. Soon I became hooked and read it every second I could. I even read it during classes. I thought I was right there in the book watching this happen. I just couldnt beleive everything that was happening. I mean who knew that Sissy was actually....

    25 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    DEEP AND DARK AND DANGEROUS- BEST BOOK EVA!!!

    ohh myyy goosshh!! this is my most favorite book to read!!!!!............ its easy and good for a good chapter book starter! its about a girl named ali who finds a photograph in her moms suitcase. nuthing weird about that right? Well actually the photograph was torn and all you could see was her mom, aunt and somebodys arm. when she flipped it to the back she say her aunts name, her moms name, and a t. she gets invited to go to Gull cottage (where the photo was taken) with her aunt and cousin. then one day her and emma (her cousin) meet a girl named Sissy. She was not scared of anything, she could jump in the water when it was freezing and all she ever wore was her faded pink bathingsuit. Sissy was mean and she turned emma into a little brat. Ali starts thinking something is up when emma starts having dreams about bones coming to get her, her aunts pitures get destrod by someone, and her aut is always mad and depressed. She sets out and finds out who sissy really is.

    16 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2008

    A Spooky Read

    I loved this book. I can't wait for the author to write more spooky tales. It had me hooked from page one. I couldn't put it down for a minute.

    15 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2011

    Deep and Dark and Dangerous- Book Review by Isabella Diserio

    This amazing story by Mary Downing Hahn is sure to keep readers on their toes. I believe that this is to entertain readers around the age of 11-25. This book is so great you will want to read it repeatedly, trust me I have! Deep and Dark and Dangerous is about a girl, Ali, who decides to spend the summer at a lake that her mom and aunt used to go to every summer when they were little. She stays there in the old cabin that has been restored with her, Aunt Dulcie and her little cousin, Emma. Her aunt is an artist so while they are there Ali has to watch her cousin, Emma. Ali's mom was completely against Ali going to the lake; she said that it was cold, rainy, and depressing. Ali however, decided she wanted to get away from her regular boring life and do something interesting. Interesting it was. While at the lake they meet a nasty little girl named Sissy; Desperate for a friend Emma will do anything to please Sissy, which causes a lot of trouble! They get into a lot of mischief, and Ali senses something extremely strange about Sissy, but what is it? You will have to read to find out! Deep and Dark and Dangerous seems to exceed the expectations of readers by flooring them with great apprehension. In my opinion, it is better than all other suspenseful books I have read! Deep and Dark and Dangerous is a 4.5 star suspenseful book that will keep readers on their toes. The storyline is unlike any other and it all together seems to top all others. Mary Downing Hahn did an excellent job! This is a fantastic story that you do not want to miss!

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2012

    Chilling

    This book really takes on voice at chapter 12. It made me want to leave the hallway lights on and look behind me every couple of minutes because im sure im watched by ghostly eyes.

    10 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    deep dark and dangourous!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    it was so thrilling i couldnt wait to turn the next pag i suggest reading this book if you havent youll <3 it so go on read it dont be scared but it is a little scary so beware.

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    BEST BOOK EVER

    IF YOU LOVE GHOST STORIES YOU WILL MOST LIKELY LOVE THIS BOOK! IT HAS ONE GHOST AND SO MANY EXCITING PARTS! FIND OUT WHAT HAPPEND TO TERRISA THE DAY SHE DROWNED! AND WHAT REALLY HAPPENS AT SYCAMORE LAKE. 187 PAGES OF LIES,SECRETS, AND ADVENTURE!

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2012

    Captivating Story

    When I first picked this book from my school reading list,I thought it would be another ghost story that's just one you'd like to quit on. Later, I realized it was a rare ghost story that kept you on the edge of your seat not wanting to put it down. I may be only 11 years old, but this is a story that I feel with thrive among my electronic/ new generation. This is a story I recommend for even older folks (no offense). Fantastic and unique writting makes the story all the better. And for you people who might get scared by this stuff, it's just creepy BTW. Hope this helped! :)

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2009

    Great

    My daughter who is 7 read this and finished it in one night. She loved t.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2008

    This is one of the Best books I have read!

    This book is very interesting. Mary Downing Hahn is a very good author and she keeps you thinking. Sissy is a very cute, annoying character that always has something up her sleeve. I really recommened this book.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2012

    Read this book!!

    This is the best book i have ever read! Every chapter you read you just want to keep reading! I couldnt put it down! You say your going to stop but you just keep reading and reading! I highly recommend this book to all ages i read it about 3 years ago and its still the best book i have ever read and i probably wont find a better book then this one! READ THE BOOK!!!:)

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 10, 2010

    Best book by Mary Downing Hahn

    I think the best part of this awsome book is when you find out what Sissy realy is.This is a very freaky,scary part of this book! I can`t wait to read alot more great books by Mary Downing Hahn!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    Lol

    Omg

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2013

    AWESOME,SWEET,AND THE BOMB!!!!!!!!!!!!BEST BOOK EVER!!!

    So good

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    Thank you school!

    I love this book so much! A close friend of mine did a report on this book in 5th grade. Finished it in two nighs!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2012

    Anonymous

    Spooky and unexpecting. Loved it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2012

    Scary!

    Awesome read!
    I have to admit this book gives me the chills!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 8, 2011

    I LOVE THIS BOOK SO MUCH!!!!!!!!

    I love this book.Right when i finished the book i was sad because i loved it so much i didnt want it to end.Also right when i finished it all i can say was WOW right then i knew what my favorite book was,Deep And Dark And Dangerous.i recomend this book to, i dont want to give anything away, but to ghost lover or sort of creep book lover like me.i love this book so much i read it in like one day i just could'nt put it down.mary downing hahn,i am her NUMBER1 fan,no doubt about it.ever since i could read i read mary downing hahn.best book ever.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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