Deep Current

Deep Current

1.5 2
by Benjamin E. Miller
     
 

A Marine unit, accompanied by a science team, is deployed to investigate an iceberg larger than Manhattan that poses a threat of incalcuable scope as it flows against the current, leaving a path of destruction in its wake. And it's heading-aiming-for Hawaii.

Their mission: to land on the floe itself, and do whatever it takes to disable the threat. But the…  See more details below

Overview

A Marine unit, accompanied by a science team, is deployed to investigate an iceberg larger than Manhattan that poses a threat of incalcuable scope as it flows against the current, leaving a path of destruction in its wake. And it's heading-aiming-for Hawaii.

Their mission: to land on the floe itself, and do whatever it takes to disable the threat. But the mission turns out to be much more than expected when the threat becomes not the floe itself, but a prehistoric, predatory, species that puts every living creature in danger.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Miller's second novel (after Zero Hour) starts with a fascinating premise-in Antarctic waters, a giant iceberg has been detected, moving against the stream and heading straight for Hawaii. Marines and biologists are dispatched to land on the leviathan, where they discover a young boy and his infant sister, the only survivors of a shipwreck. The boy talks nervously of the ghosts on the floe, and soon after, members of the landing party begin to meet with gruesome ends provided by mollusk-like creatures called cephids, byproducts of evolution taking a nasty turn. At this point, the story switches from military procedural to horror story, with members of the landing crew dispatched one by one and the survivors pulling together for a final showdown with the enemy; think Night of the Living Dead on an iceberg. Miller is not afraid to pile on the gore ("His viscera spilled onto the floor in a steaming heap"), which gets tiresome before long. The characters are thin and there are unresolved issues at story's end, but the story works on a gut level, thanks to a chilling monster and brisk pacing, even if it doesn't live up to the potential of its imaginative and promising setup. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451411297
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA)
Publication date:
03/02/2004
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
4.32(w) x 6.66(h) x 1.04(d)

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Deep Current 1.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I didn't care for Deep Current. The cover shot on the book is very misleading, leading one to believe that it is an action story ala Cussler. Folks I have to tell you that this seemed more like a over the top graphic gory horror novel than anything remotely like Clive Cussler. The authors description on the book jacket should have been more clear cause it was a surprise, the kind of nasty surprise that you may get when ordering dinner at a nice restaurant and finding a roach in your meal. ¾ of this book is simply about mutants living on an iceberg with a very well satisfied taste for human flesh devouring people in excruciatingly graphic detail. Images such as a graphic description of a human head floating around in the transparent mutant monster digestive tract were not images that I wanted to see in my minds eye. I got fed up with the continuous gratuitous gore especially after the young preteen shipwreck survivor is terrorized/traumatized during the scene with the human head. I found theat I could skip whole pages and still follow the plot, so much is wasted on gore. Also, there was absolutely no character development as they spent most of their time either being devoured by mutant monsters or running away from them. A big mistake is killing off one of the best characters with good development potential very early in the book leaving no one else to develop. If I wanted to read a novel about mutants, I'd have reread Relic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great concept but very little in the way of combat. When I saw the book cover with self propelled artillery trundling across the ice and talk of a Marine unit fighting I imagined lots of gritty arctic combat with artillery rounds tearing up the landscape. The book had neither. There isn't any artillery in this novel (shame on the cover artist), just an armored personnel carrier, and the action sequences simply consist of panicked defensive actions. Instead the book spends 90% of its 355 pages describing the various states of misery each character is forced to endure and what they think about their misery until they die or escape. I was aching for the Marines to go from the defensive to the offensive which only came (predictably) at the end of 355 pages. Once I realised that this tale was only going to deliver fleeing characters in variuus states of fear and misery until a final 'climax', I struggled to continue reading. I finished the last 20 pages so that I could write this review knowing that I had read the entire book. This concept could have provided a rip roaring military action adventure but instead turned into an unending 355 page catalog of human (and animal!) misery. Two thumbs down.