Deep Doo-Doo

Deep Doo-Doo

3.3 3
by Michael C. Delaney, Michael Delaney
     
 

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When electronics whiz Bennet and his best friend, Pete, discover a way to interrupt local television broadcasts, they set out to spoof their governor's reelection campaign, using a Dracula-masked Labrador as spokesdog. When the broadcasts capture national attention, everyone -- even the FBI! -- wants to know who's behind the mystery dog known as Deep Doo-doo. How long

Overview

When electronics whiz Bennet and his best friend, Pete, discover a way to interrupt local television broadcasts, they set out to spoof their governor's reelection campaign, using a Dracula-masked Labrador as spokesdog. When the broadcasts capture national attention, everyone -- even the FBI! -- wants to know who's behind the mystery dog known as Deep Doo-doo. How long can Bennet and Pete stay on the air before they're in over their heads? "Very believable and very funny. This should satisfy aspiring inventors and children who enjoy a good laugh at the expense of adults."-- Booklist

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Delaney's (Henry's Special Delivery) mildly amusing story of boy inventor Bennet Ordway's interference with an upcoming gubernatorial race is liberal politics lite. Frustrated with the incumbent's hypocritical "family values" platform, 12-year-old Bennet and his friend Pete use a souped-up television transmitter to interrupt the governor's speeches with clever commentary on the importance of funding health care, education and the environment. Bennet, signing himself "Deep Doo-doo" after Watergate informant Deep Throat, sends his newspaper-reporter father hints on the hot story. The broadcasting scenes sparkle with swift action and political puns, but the end result is anticlimactically humorless-the bad guy loses the election and Mr. Ordway learns he needs to spend more time with his son. Characters are a bit hollow, defined chiefly by token qualities: Bennet has a stutter and always wears the same hat, while Pete never leaves home without his Frisbee. Still, the premise is delivered with enough punch that this romp may be enjoyed by junior inventors, future reporters and those who can overcome their embarrassment at reaching for a book with "doo-doo" in the title. Ages 8-11. (Nov.)
Children's Literature - Lois Rubin Gross
When 12-year-old Bennett Ordway hears his parents discussing their intense dislike of their state's current governor, he decides that someone needs to derail the governor's reelection bid. Bennett and his best friend, Pete, cleverly assemble a high-powered TV transmitter from odds and ends, and break into a local station's broadcast schedule with their own political message. Pete's dog, Gus, disguised by a Dracula mask, becomes a "spokesdog" as the boys skewer the governor's family values, positions, and his do-nothing administration. Bennett's dad, a journalist with aspirations to be either Woodward or Bernstein, thinks he has been tapped for greatness when Deep Doo-Doo starts alerting him to upcoming canine-casts. If Bennett's dad seems a bit dim to be a reporter, catching none of the obvious clues as to who is the mastermind behind Deep Doo-Doo, young readers will not care. This is a bouncy piece of fiction with definite "Afterschool Special" possibilities. The chaotic description of Gus, the dog, taking off after two gerbils named Sick and Tired, seems particularly cinematic. Meanwhile, there are timely lessons as to the consequences of political falsehoods. Historical references to the Watergate break-in just might inspire some young readers to research that now-ancient event.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-This book will get a lot of mileage from its title alone. It's about two 12-year-olds who build a TV transmitter and override a local station's broadcasts. Bennet is a stutterer and a scientific genius (unbeknownst to his folks). He and his happy-go-lucky but sensitive best friend, Pete, discover that their latest electronics project works better than they ever imagined it would. Bennet's dad, a reporter for the local newspaper, rails against the hypocrisy of the governor, who is always pontificating about "family values" rather than addressing any real concerns. Pete, outraged when Bennet clues him in on the politician's posturing, is inspired to use their newfound invention to sabotage the incumbent's locally televised speech with a home movie showing his black Lab "speaking out" on the issues. Delaney's characterizations are cardboard, the politics trivialized, and the mystery, as such, is weak; but none of these flaws will prevent kids from enjoying the cartoon possibility of breaking into broadcasting through electronic legerdemain. While the premise is technically fragile, the politics are preachy, and the stuttering insufferable, readers may actually show some interest in the historical references, although they'll hardly listen to, much less analyze, the next candidate's speech.-John Sigwald, Unger Memorial Library, Plainview, TX

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140387476
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
10/01/1998
Series:
Puffin Novel Series
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
7.74(w) x 5.08(h) x 0.47(d)
Lexile:
780L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Michael Delaney, author of Deep Doo-Doo and other novels, lives in Greenwich, Connecticut.

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Deep Doo-Doo 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Bennett and Pete accidentally break into a TV broadcast with their antenna invention. They then use it to preempt the Governor's campaign speech. Using Pete's dog Gus, disguised in a Dracula mask to deliver their complaints about the Governor's policies, they create instant havoc in the town. Bennett's dad is a reporter for the local newspaper and becomes the one person who receives written warnings of upcoming Deep Doo Doo broadcasts. Deep Doo Doo becomes national news and is covered on the front page of even the New York Times! Bennett stutters his way delightfully through this story, getting the name Deep Doo Doo from his knowledge of the Watergate Scandal and the informer Deep Throat. Read the rest, I won't spoil the ending. I thought it was hilarious. I laughed out loud when I was alone!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this book is good. Ya. GOOD. Now go out and buy this bread book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
read it