Deep Down; A Tale of the Cornish Mines

Deep Down; A Tale of the Cornish Mines

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by Robert Michael Ballantyne
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally… See more details below

Overview

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781290605274
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
08/28/2012
Pages:
450
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.91(d)

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CHAPTER IV. AT WOBK UM IKK Til F. SEA. CniP, chip, chip,—down in the dusky mine! Oh, tut the rock at which the miner chipped was hard, and the bit of rock on which he sat was hard, and the muscles with which he toiled were hard from prolonged labour; and the lot of the man seemed hard, as he sat there in the hot, heavy atmosphere, hour after hour, from morn till eve, with the sweat pouring down his brow and over his naked shoulders, toiling and moiling with hammer and chisel. But stout David Trevarrow did not think his lot peculiarly hard. His workshop was a low narrow tunnel deep down under the surface of the earth—ay, and deep under the bottom of the sea ! His daily sun was a tallow-candle, which rose regularly at seven in the morning and set at three in the afternoon- His atmosphere was sadly deficient in life-giving oxygen, and much vitiated by gunpowder-smoke- His working costume consisted only of a pair of linen trousers; his colour from top to toe was redas brick-dust, owing to the iron-ore around him; his food was a slice of bread, with, perchance, when he was unusually luxurious, the addition of a Cornish pasty; and his drink was water. To an inexperienced eye the man's work would have appeared not only hard but hopeless, for although his hammer was heavy, his arm strong, and his chisel sharp and tempered well, each blow produced an apparently insignificant effect on the flinty rock. Frequently a spark of fire was all that resulted from a blow, and seldom did more than a series of little chips fly off, although the man was of herculean mould, and worked " with a will," as was evident from the kind of gasp or stern expulsion of the breath with which each blow wasaccompanied. Unaided human strength he knew could not achieve much in such a process, so he directed h...

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