Deeper Than Gold: A Guide to Indian Life in the Sierra Foothills

Overview

Brian Bibby brings together the present and the past—both ancient and recent—in a fascinating compilation of anecdote, myth, recollection, and reflection. Five years in the making and the result of almost thirty years of dedicated work among California's native communities, Deeper Than Gold is a tribute to the people who know Gold Country best. Witness a visual history with family photographs from private albums and stunning original work by renowned photographer Dugan Aguilar (of Paiute/Pit River/Maidu ...

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Overview

Brian Bibby brings together the present and the past—both ancient and recent—in a fascinating compilation of anecdote, myth, recollection, and reflection. Five years in the making and the result of almost thirty years of dedicated work among California's native communities, Deeper Than Gold is a tribute to the people who know Gold Country best. Witness a visual history with family photographs from private albums and stunning original work by renowned photographer Dugan Aguilar (of Paiute/Pit River/Maidu heritage). This gorgeously designed book offers an intimate view of the remarkable and persistent people of Gold Country whose culture continues to evolve and thrive in the area around Highway 49.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780930588960
  • Publisher: Heyday Books
  • Publication date: 11/28/2004
  • Pages: 204
  • Product dimensions: 9.04 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Dugan Aguilar:
Dugan Aguilar is a Pauite/Pit River/Maidu photographer whose work celebrates the perseverance of Native American culture. He has exhibited his work at the Institute for Indian Arts, the California State Indian Museum, and the C.N. Gorman Museum. He is the recipient of several awards from the Santa Fe Indian Market.
Brian Bibby:
For more than forty years, Brian Bibby has been involved with Native communities, families, and individuals, preserving and documenting their various cultural art forms, languages, and oral histories. He has taught at a number of institutions and conducted research at museums and archives across the nation. He has also served as a consultant and guest curator for many cultural and folk arts programs. His other books include The Fine Art of California Indian Basketry, Deeper Than Gold: A Guide to Indian Life in the Sierra Foothills, and Precious Cargo: California Indian Cradle Baskets and Childbirth Traditions.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2005

    Uhhh...Story of Chief Bautista is Uncomplete.

    Uhhh...Regarding the story of Chief Bautista in Deeper than Gold. Sure Chief Bautista was one of the chiefs to first fight Major James Savage and the whites, which was short-lived...BUT LATER... Chief Bautista and Major James Savage became great friends. Bautista was Savage's right hand man. He helped Savage keep the Indians in line. Where was that in the book? He gave Major Savage his women to seal their friendship. Chief Bautista or Vow-chester made his people work for Savage in Savage's gold mines around Sonora and Mariposa. Where was that in the book? Chief Bautista was also Major James Savage's cook. Chief Bautista also had his men capture run-away Indians and bring them back. The whites heaped praise on Chief Bautista for his assistance. Chief Bautista used his influence to keep the Indians in line, but he could not keep the Chowchilla Yokuts and Chief Tenaya's band in line for the whites. March 1851, after Savage's trading post was attacked and burned in Dec. 1850, the whites asked Chief Bautista to make the other surrounding chiefs sign a peace treaty. Some of the whites distrusted Bautista because they distrusted ALL Indians and remembered years ago he had fought them. To show them he could be trusted Bautista brought all the neighboring chiefs in to sign. All but two who he had NO control of the Chowchilla Yokuts and the Ahwahneechees refused to listen. That is when the name of the 'Yosemites' was first documented. Chief Bautista, along with Russio, named the Ahwahneechees the 'Yosemites' because they were afraid of them. Yosemite in their language meant 'The Killers or 'The Grizzlies'. Bautista and the other neighboring chiefs were afraid of them and would never enter Yosemite Valley. In the Stockton Republic, in the same week of March 1851, Chief Bautista was quoted in another version of the Ahwahneechees calling them the 'Monahs' which meant they were Monos. He mentioned the Chowchilla Yokuts and the Ahwahneechees (Monahs)in the Stockton Republic and in Bunnell's Book. After Chief Bautista had brought all the neighboring chiefs to sign the Fremont 'Peace' treaty those doubting whites changed their mind about Chief Bautista's alliance. Also in the Stockton newspapers there is something that was never mentioned before in Lafayette Bunnell's book 'The Discovery of the Yosemite, 1851'. You see not only was it Major James Savage and the Mariposa Battalion who went after Chief Tenaya and the Yosemite Indians, but mentioned in the Stockton newspaper were also '100 of Savage's Indians'. Without the help of those Indians the whites stated that they would have never captured Chief Tenaya and his people. They helped find them. For his service in assistance in capturing Chief Tenaya and the Yosemites, Chief Bautista received 'a scarf, a shirt and a pair of pantaloons'. Where is that in Deeper than Gold? I heard Brian Bibby is now a Honary Miwok. Maybe that is why he forgot that part of the story?

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