Defense Policy Choices for the Bush Administration, 2001-2005 / Edition 1

Defense Policy Choices for the Bush Administration, 2001-2005 / Edition 1

by Michael E. O'Hanlon
     
 

ISBN-10: 0815700792

ISBN-13: 9780815700791

Pub. Date: 03/28/2001

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

This latest study in the Brookings series on U.S. defense strategy and the defense budget reviews current American military capabilities and offers suggestions for the new administration and Congress. Michael O'Hanlon makes sense of the hot political topic of military readiness, questions the continued relevance of the current two-war framework for structuring most

Overview

This latest study in the Brookings series on U.S. defense strategy and the defense budget reviews current American military capabilities and offers suggestions for the new administration and Congress. Michael O'Hanlon makes sense of the hot political topic of military readiness, questions the continued relevance of the current two-war framework for structuring most conventional combat forces, and challenges the wisdom of current plans for the procurement of advanced jet fighters, helicopters, and submarines. The book also focuses on missile defense, other means of homeland defense, the so-called revolution in military affairs, and possible conflicts between Taiwan and China that could involve U.S. forces. Throughout, the author looks for ways to close the gap between the cost of projected U.S. defense forces and the budget actually available to the Pentagon.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780815700791
Publisher:
Brookings Institution Press
Publication date:
03/28/2001
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
244
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1Introduction1
A Successful Defense Drawdown6
Major Challenges and Problems Ahead9
No Easy Answers12
Why Budgetary Constraints Remain14
Plan of the Book18
Chapter 2Military Readiness and Overseas Commitments22
Current and Future U.S. Military Readiness22
Reducing Overseas Commitments41
Conclusion57
Chapter 3Modifying the Two-War Framework59
A New Two-War Concept: "Desert Storm plus Desert Shield plus Bosnia"63
The Capabilities of Smaller, Rapidly Deployable U.S. Forces67
The Hollowing Iraqi and North Korean Militaries69
South Korea's Strong Military71
Conclusion74
AppendixBeyond the Korean and Iraqi Threats76
Chapter 4Modernizing the U.S. Military82
The Contemporary Debate on a Revolution in Military Affairs83
Rethinking the Pentagon's Modernization Agenda96
Conclusion114
Chapter 5Homeland Defense115
The Homeland Defense Budget122
New Initiatives to Combat Terrorism130
New Initiatives To Protect Cyber Infrastructure136
New Initiatives to Secure and Destroy Former Soviet WMD139
Conclusion141
Chapter 6Building a Limited National Missile Defense and Cutting Nuclear Forces143
The Case for Limited National Missile Defense147
The Clinton Administration's NMD Program156
Boost-Phase Endoatmospheric Intercept164
Offensive Nuclear Weapons168
Conclusion174
Chapter 7Helping Taiwan Defeat a Chinese Blockade177
The Strategic Backdrop179
The China-Taiwan Military Balance182
Why China Could Not Seize Taiwan189
Could China Coerce Taiwan's Capitulation?208
Force Planning Implications for the United States213
The Basic Approach to Breaking the PRC Blockade216
Arms Sales222
Conclusion225
Chapter 8Summary and Conclusion227
Less Expensive Weaponry228
A Different Two-War Capability229
Selective Reductions in Overseas Deployments230
More Defense and Less (Nuclear) Offense231
Selective Increases in Certain Activities232
Modest Increases in the Defense Budget233
Index235

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