Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain

by Peter N. Miller
     
 

This book discusses the crisis of the early modern state in eighteenth-century Britain and sets it in its European context. The American Revolution and the simultaneous demand for wider religious toleration at home challenged the principles of sovereignty and obligation that underpinned arguments about the character of the state. At stake was a fundamental challenge… See more details below

Overview

This book discusses the crisis of the early modern state in eighteenth-century Britain and sets it in its European context. The American Revolution and the simultaneous demand for wider religious toleration at home challenged the principles of sovereignty and obligation that underpinned arguments about the character of the state. At stake was a fundamental challenge to the way in which politics was described. The Americans and their British supporters argued that individuals, by voting and thinking freely, ought to determine the common good. These influential ideas continue to resonate today in the principles of one man, one vote and freedom of thought.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521442596
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/16/1994
Series:
Ideas in Context Series, #29
Pages:
488
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.21(h) x 1.26(d)

Meet the Author

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction1
1The figure of Cicero21
2A classical landscape88
3State and empire150
4The limits of sovereignty and obligation214
5The common good, toleration and freedom of thought266
6'Alternatives' to the common good 1774-1776349
Conclusion413
Bibliography422
Index463

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