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Delphi: A History of the Center of the Ancient World
     

Delphi: A History of the Center of the Ancient World

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by Michael Scott
 

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The oracle and sanctuary of the Greek god Apollo at Delphi were known as the "omphalos"—the "center" or "navel"—of the ancient world for more than 1000 years. Individuals, city leaders, and kings came from all over the Mediterranean and beyond to consult Delphi's oracular priestess; to set up monuments to the gods; and to take part in competitions.

Overview

The oracle and sanctuary of the Greek god Apollo at Delphi were known as the "omphalos"—the "center" or "navel"—of the ancient world for more than 1000 years. Individuals, city leaders, and kings came from all over the Mediterranean and beyond to consult Delphi's oracular priestess; to set up monuments to the gods; and to take part in competitions.

In this richly illustrated account, Michael Scott covers the history and nature of Delphi, from the literary and archaeological evidence surrounding the site, to its rise as a center of worship, to the constant appeal of the oracle despite her cryptic prophecies. He describes how Delphi became a contested sacred site for Greeks and Romans and a storehouse for the treasures of rival city-states and foreign kings. He also examines the eventual decline of the site and how its meaning and importance have continued to be reshaped.

A unique window into the center of the ancient world, Delphi will appeal to general readers, tourists, students, and specialists.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
02/10/2014
Classicist and ancient history scholar Scott (From Democrats to Kings) examines the center of the ancient Greek world, Delphi, which held an important yet fragile cultural position for centuries. Remembered today primarily for its oracle, Delphi was visited by pilgrims from near and far to ask questions of the Pythia, the priestess who received divine messages. Exposure to other peoples made Delphi a center for information, and its position along trade routes caused the city, and its sanctuary, to flourish. Scott pieces together the beginnings of the oracle through accounts given in various stories, but asks bigger questions in the process—for ex-ample, why did Greek society work to retrospectively explain Delphi’s roots? He continues by investigating into the structure of the community (the appointed council, the Amphictyony) and the political intricacies involved, and he ends by giving an account of site excavations in the 20th and 21st centuries. Scott’s passion and expertise are readily apparent, and though it may be somewhat dry for general readers, the book should prove to be an enjoyable resource for scholars and students. Additionally, prospective visitors to the modern site of Delphi will be interested in Scott’s brief guide, which is included at the back of the book. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2014

Shortlisted for the 2015 Runciman Award, Anglo-Hellenic League

"[D]eftly combines literary and material evidence. . . . Overall, Scott offers a broad and well-documented history of the Delphic oracle, including an (excellent) epilogue on how the site was rediscovered at the end of the 19th century."—Barbara Graziosi, Times Higher Education

"[O]f absorbing interest. . . . I doubt whether there's a single archaeological report or relevant inscription, however obscure, that has escaped his notice, and no other scholar known to me keeps one so constantly conscious of the realities . . . that leave him with the nagging question: 'What motivated the continuation of settlement in this otherwise rather difficult physical habitat clinging to the mountainside?'. . . [Scott's] final chapters give the fullest and most vivid general account of Delphi's slow excavation over the past century that I've seen. . . . Scott's narrative never falters."—Peter Green, London Review of Books

"Judicious, measured and thorough . . . Mr. Scott, like Pausanias before him, is a handy companion to what remains—and what we can only wish was still to be seen."—Brendan Boyle, Wall Street Journal

"Scott's passion and expertise are readily apparent. . . . An enjoyable resource for scholars and students. Additionally, prospective visitors to the modern site of Delphi will be interested in Scott's brief guide, which is included at the back of the book."Publishers Weekly

"Tells you everything there is to know about Delphi."—Sam Leith, Spectator

"A traveler on a typical ten-hour flight to Greece from the United States will find this book to be a valuable and entertaining companion."About.com Greece Travel

"The story is told clearly and engagingly."—Peter Jones, Literary Review

"I don't think there can be much about Delphi's history that Dr. Scott has missed out on in this book. I needn't have worried that only one book on the subject wouldn't be enough to give me enough information for my visit. I wanted the definitive book and as far as I'm concerned I picked the right one."Tales from A Tour Guide

"The oracle is not the main concern of this fine, scholarly book. Although you can hardly write about Delphi without writing about the Pythia, Scott's interest is much more in the site itself, the way it developed from a couple of buildings on a mountainside into the elaborate sanctuary of the classical period and beyond. . . . Because Delphi was the focus of so much ancient attention, this rich but remote archaeological site gives us a keyhole view of the history of the ancient world as a whole, as cities are founded and proclaim their existence to the international community; as cities fall and find their monuments encroached on, buried or pecked at by prophetic crows; as dedications to commemorate victories over foreigners at Salamis give way to trophies of victories over other Greeks; as the Spartans inscribe their name on a gift of Croesus and hope no one will notice."—James Davidson, The Guardian

"This is an engaging tribute to a site that enjoined its visitors to know themselves—a demand that, in turn, requires us to know the Greeks."—Alex Clapp, Ekathimerini

"Excellent. . . . The more important question for [Scott] is not how the oracle functioned, but why it endured as an institution for over a thousand years. For the scholar who wants to see the full range of evidence and possible interpretations—a rounded view—this approach is particularly useful."—Daisy Dunn, History Today

"[A] comprehensive and sympathetic history. . . . Scott puts it beautifully: both as an idea and an historical conundrum, Delphi ensures we keep the ground 'insecure' beneath our feet."—Bettany Hughes, BBC History Magazine

"Scott's erudition is balanced by a lively style, making for a thoroughly readable work. Copies endnotes, bibliography, and illustrations (including eight in color) accompany the text, as does a brief guide to the site's museum."—Choice

"[T]here is much to commend in this new history, which deserves to be widely read."—Hugh Bowden, Anglo-Hellenic Review

"[A] thoroughly researched, highly readable, insightful, enjoyable, and comprehensive tour of one of the ancient world's most fascinating sites."—Guy Maclean Rogers,American Historical Review

"Well written and enjoyable to read. . . . A brief guide for those touring the site and its surroundings in the appendix makes this book a knowledgeable travel companion for all those visiting Delphi for the first time."—Julia Kindt, European Review of History

"A reliable, well-informed, and highly readable account based on the author's considerable knowledge of the site and the archaeological campaigns that have brought it back into the light. . . . [A] fine and lucid book."—Craige B. Champion, The Historian

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781400851324
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
03/10/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
440
Sales rank:
600,642
File size:
6 MB

Meet the Author

Michael Scott is associate professor of classics and ancient history at the University of Warwick. He has written and presented a number of ancient history documentaries for National Geographic, the History channel, Nova, and the BBC, including one on Delphi. For more information, go to .

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Delphi: A History of the Center of the Ancient World 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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