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Delusional Disorder: Paranoia and Related Illnesses
     

Delusional Disorder: Paranoia and Related Illnesses

by Munro Alistair, Alistair Munro
 
This book provides a comprehensive review of delusional disorder, a condition that was only reintroduced into modern psychiatric diagnosis in 1987, after being subsumed with schizophrenia for more than half a century. Illustrated throughout with case histories, the book begins with the emergence of the concept of delusional disorder, and goes on to detail its manifold

Overview

This book provides a comprehensive review of delusional disorder, a condition that was only reintroduced into modern psychiatric diagnosis in 1987, after being subsumed with schizophrenia for more than half a century. Illustrated throughout with case histories, the book begins with the emergence of the concept of delusional disorder, and goes on to detail its manifold presentations, differential diagnosis, and treatment. An invaluable reference for psychiatrists and other clinicians, this wide-ranging and authoritative text emphasises that, contrary to traditional belief, delusional disorder is in most cases a treatable illness.

Editorial Reviews

3 Stars from Doody
New England Journal of Medicine
Munro has done members of the medical and legal professions a service by providing a cogent synthesis of difficult material. His book will be of great interest not only to those in the mental health field but also to dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and lawyers, who often unwittingly must deal with delusional persons.
Royce Lee
This book is focused on the fascinating but often forgotten illness, delusional disorder. The author discusses the paraphrenias, cycloid psychoses, paranoid schizophrenia, and schizotypal and schizoid personality disorders. Special attention is given to the tentative conclusion that Pimozide is the most effective agent for treatment. The purpose is to present history, modern views, and recent research of delusional disorder, along with a summary of treatment recommendations. While this book is clearly intended for psychiatrists, the elegant yet lucid prose and handsome binding come somewhat as a surprise. The author's easy presentation can be deceptive. While there are no charts, graphs, or diagrams, and there is a definite de-emphasis on epidemiological data, quite a bit of clinical information is given in the way of anecdotes, case presentations, and reviews of the literature on relevant topics. These are well annotated; the reference lists themselves are invaluable for those interested in doing more in depth reading. Munro's method would best be compared to Kraeplin. He is most concerned with phenomenology, history, and outcome. There is very little speculation about causation, either psychological or biological. Those readers intent on finding a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic will be disappointed. However, those willing to put trust in the author's extensive clinical experience with this disorder, as well his logical, concise summaries of the limited but interesting research, will find this an interesting book on an elusive disorder.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Royce Lee, MD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This book is focused on the fascinating but often forgotten illness, delusional disorder. The author discusses the paraphrenias, cycloid psychoses, paranoid schizophrenia, and schizotypal and schizoid personality disorders. Special attention is given to the tentative conclusion that Pimozide is the most effective agent for treatment.
Purpose: The purpose is to present history, modern views, and recent research of delusional disorder, along with a summary of treatment recommendations.
Audience: While this book is clearly intended for psychiatrists, the elegant yet lucid prose and handsome binding come somewhat as a surprise.
Features: The author's easy presentation can be deceptive. While there are no charts, graphs, or diagrams, and there is a definite de-emphasis on epidemiological data, quite a bit of clinical information is given in the way of anecdotes, case presentations, and reviews of the literature on relevant topics. These are well annotated; the reference lists themselves are invaluable for those interested in doing more in depth reading.
Assessment: Munro's method would best be compared to Kraeplin. He is most concerned with phenomenology, history, and outcome. There is very little speculation about causation, either psychological or biological. Those readers intent on finding a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic will be disappointed. However, those willing to put trust in the author's extensive clinical experience with this disorder, as well his logical, concise summaries of the limited but interesting research, will find this an interesting book on an elusive disorder.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521029803
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/28/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
276
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.63(d)

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