Dem Bones by Bob Barner, Chronicle Books, Design Inc Higashi/Glaser |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Dem Bones

Dem Bones

4.7 7
by Bob Barner, Chronicle Books, Design Inc Higashi/Glaser
     
 

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Dancing skeletons teach the way bones connect in this lively version of a familiar African American song. Accompanied by interesting, informative "bone facts, " this book makes a wonderful addition to both home and classroom libraries and a fun treat for Halloween. Full color.

Overview

Dancing skeletons teach the way bones connect in this lively version of a familiar African American song. Accompanied by interesting, informative "bone facts, " this book makes a wonderful addition to both home and classroom libraries and a fun treat for Halloween. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, Starred Review, September 16, 1996
Using a classic African American spiritual as a springboard, Barner dives gleefully into this clever anatomy lesson. Enthusiastic members of a skeleton band cavort across the pages, strumming guitars, blowing hoRNs and otherwise helping to establish a spirited tone while imparting bits of relevant information. Each line from the song is given its own spread; text blocks set into the illustrations give related facts. For the lyric "Leg bone connected to da knee bone," for example, readers learn that the knee joint "works like a hinge," enabling one to "kick, jump, squat, and dance." The particular bone in question is always high-lighted in red on the skeleton, leaving no room for doubt. Splashed across a series of bright backdrops (Halloween colors predominate), Barner's (Bennys Pennies) cut and torn-paper collages are geared for tickling the funny bones of the early elementary set. Just about the only thing lacking here is the musical notation for a sing-along. No bones about it, this will be a real boost for those looking to inject a little humor and fun into basic facts about the human body. Ages 2-8.

CHILD, October 1996
This cast of frolicking skeletons is sure to tickle any kid's funny bone. Plus, readers will learn some anatomical facts, like how many bones we're born with (450).

CHILDREN'S BOOK REVIEW SERVICE, October 1996
Barner uses the African-American song "Dem Bones" to take children on an insightful journey through the human body. Children will be able to sing along to the familiar tune (and perhaps even act it out). A perfect real-aloud for its use of the song and because of the large, vivid collage illustrations.

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, November 1996
Descriptions of skeletal structures are interspersed with the words of the traditional African American spiritual "Dem Bones." Leg bones, ankle bones, and neck bones are described in medical terminology and their structures are explained in simple terms for young readers. Subtle humor is helpful in explaining some of the concepts ("The skull is like a box that grows."). The colorful paper collage illustrations add humor and feature dancing, smiling skeletons playing instruments in accompaniment to the lyrics. This could be enjoyed as a picture book, using just the lyrics, but it works just as well as easy nonfiction.

FAMILY LIFE, November 1996
You remember the old spiritual, the one that goes something like, "The toe bone's connected to the foot bone, Foot bone's connected to the ankebone...." Barner has connected the song to his exuberant pictures of music-playing skeletons and fun information about human anatomy. The result is a book that entertains and educates this age group and gets them tapping their toe bones, too. Bravo.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Using a classic African American spiritual as a springboard, Barner dives gleefully into this clever anatomy lesson. Enthusiastic members of a skeleton band cavort across the pages, strumming guitars, blowing horns and otherwise helping to establish a spirited tone while imparting bits of relevant information. Each line from the song is given its own spread; text blocks set into the illustrations give related facts. For the lyric "Leg bone connected to da knee bone," for example, readers learn that the knee joint "works like a hinge," enabling one to "kick, jump, squat, and dance." The particular bone in question is always highlighted in red on the skeleton, leaving no room for doubt. Splashed across a series of bright backdrops (Halloween colors predominate), Barner's (Benny's Pennies) cut- and torn-paper collages are geared for tickling the funny bones of the early elementary set. Just about the only thing lacking here is the musical notation for a sing-along. No bones about it, this will be a real boost for those looking to inject a little humor and fun into basic facts about the human body. Ages 2-8. (Oct.)
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
Can you blend Halloween and a skinny science lesson? Check out these merry skeletons as they demonstrate the function of major bones. The narration is brief and elementary in this unique introduction to the human skeleton. Cut-paper collages provide lots of contrast as the bony stars pose before deep shaded backgrounds. Helpful chart labels twenty major bones.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Descriptions of skeletal structures are interspersed with the words of the traditional African American spiritual, "Dem Bones." Leg bones, ankle bones, and neck bones are described in medical terminology and their structures are explained in simple terms for young readers. Subtle humor is helpful in explaining some of the concepts ("The skull is like a box that grows."). The colorful paper collage illustrations add humor and feature dancing, smiling skeletons playing instruments in accompaniment to the lyrics. This could be enjoyed as a picture book, using just the lyrics, but it works just as well as easy nonfiction.-Christine A. Moesch, Buffalo & Erie County Public Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811808279
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
09/01/1996
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
597,616
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.12(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Bob Barner loves music (he owns seventeen guitars and four ukuleles) and had never broken a bone until he wrote this book. He's presented Dem Bones in Guam, India, Mexico, and South Korea, and has received bone art from many other places around the world. He lives in San Francisco.

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Dem Bones 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My Mother sang this song to my 2 brothers, 7 sisters and me when we were younger in the 50's and 60's. It originates in the Book of Ezekiel Ch.37, when God breathed life into the 'dry bones' of the whole house of(Israel)saying, 'Hear the word of the Lord!' Now I have the pleasure to read it to my First Graders! We dance and sing along with the bones. Amen...
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book to a group of preschoolers with autism. It is for our Halloween theme this month. They absolutely enjoyed it. As I read I have them touch the different 'bones' on their body. I sing the song at the end,and they clap and join in as best as they can!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just like the song! It's a neat book that talks in simple terms about what bones we have and how they work. The fact that it has the old african american folk song is an ADDED BONUS - fun to read and sing!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Buddy were are chu i miss chu
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She smiled and layed down grooming her pelt
Anonymous More than 1 year ago