Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism

Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism

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by Richard D. Wolff
     
 

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“Ideas of economic democracy are very much in the air, as they should be, with increasing urgency in the midst of today’s serious crises. Richard Wolff’s constructive and innovative ideas suggest new and promising foundations for much more authentic democracy and sustainable and equitable development, ideas that can be implemented directly and

Overview

“Ideas of economic democracy are very much in the air, as they should be, with increasing urgency in the midst of today’s serious crises. Richard Wolff’s constructive and innovative ideas suggest new and promising foundations for much more authentic democracy and sustainable and equitable development, ideas that can be implemented directly and carried forward. A very valuable contribution in troubled times.”—Noam Chomsky

"Probably America's most prominent Marxist economist."—The New York Times

Capitalism as a system has spawned deepening economic crisis alongside its bought-and-paid-for political establishment. Neither serves the needs of our society. Whether it is secure, well-paid, and meaningful jobs or a sustainable relationship with the natural environment that we depend on, our society is not delivering the results people need and deserve.

One key cause for this intolerable state of affairs is the lack of genuine democracy in our economy as well as in our politics. The solution requires the institution of genuine economic democracy, starting with workers managing their own workplaces, as the basis for a genuine political democracy.

Here Richard D. Wolff lays out a hopeful and concrete vision of how to make that possible, addressing the many people who have concluded economic inequality and politics as usual can no longer be tolerated and are looking for a concrete program of action.

Richard D. Wolff is professor of Economics emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is currently a visiting professor at the New School University in New York. Wolff is the author of many books, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It. He hosts the weekly hour-long radio program Economic Update on WBAI (Pacifica Radio) and writes regularly for The Guardian, Truthout.org, and the MRZine.


Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Probably America’s most prominent Marxist economist.”
—New York Times Magazine

“Imagine a country where the majority of the population reaps the majority of the benefits for their hard work, creative ingenuity, and collaborative efforts. Imagine a country where corporate losses aren't socialized, while gains are captured by an exclusive minority. Imagine a country run as a democracy, from the bottom up, not a plutocracy from the top down. Richard Wolff not only imagines it, but in his compelling, captivating and stunningly reasoned new book, Democracy at Work, he details how we get there from here — and why we absolutely must.”
—Nomi Prins, Author of It Takes a Pillage and Black Tuesday

"Richard Wolff is the leading socialist economist in the country. This book is required reading for anyone concerned about a fundamental transformation of the ailing capitalist economy!" - Cornel West

"Ideas of economic democracy are very much in the air, as they should be,
with increasing urgency in the midst of today's serious crises. Richard Wolff's
constructive and innovative ideas suggest new and promising foundations for
much more authentic democracy and sustainable and equitable development,
ideas that can be implemented directly and carried forward. A very valuable
contribution in troubled times." —Noam Chomsky

“Bold, thoughtful, transformative—a powerful and challenging vision of that takes us beyond both corporate capitalism and state socialism. Richard Wolff at his best!”
—Gar Alperovitz, author of America Beyond Capitalism; Lionel R. Bauman Professor of Political Economy, University of Maryland

Praise for Capitalism Hits the Fan (book and DVD)

“With unerring coherence and unequaled breadth of knowledge, Rick Wolff offers a rich and much needed corrective to the views of mainstream economists and pundits. It would be difficult to come away from this... with anything but an acute appreciation of what is needed to get us out of this mess.”
—Stanley Aronowitz, Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Urban Education, City University of New York

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781608462575
Publisher:
Haymarket Books
Publication date:
10/02/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
220
Sales rank:
645,254
File size:
216 KB

Meet the Author

Richard D. Wolff is a American economist, well-known for his work on Marxist economics, economic methodology and class analysis.

Wolff received his Ph.D. in economics from Yale University in 1969. Wolff taught at the City College of New York from 1969-1973, and teaches graduate seminars and undergraduate courses and direct dissertation research in economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

He has authored numerous articles and books and has given many public lectures at colleges and universities (Notre Dame, University of Missouri, Washington College, Franklin and Marshall College, New York University, etc.) to community and trade union meetings, in high schools, etc. He also maintains an extensive schedule of media interviews (on many independent radio stations such as KPFA in Berkeley, KPFK in Los Angeles, WBAI in New York, National Public Radio stations, the Real News Network, the Glenn Beck Show, and so on).

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Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
YotSlot More than 1 year ago
Easy to read, important to know, this book, in a matter-of-fact way, presents both the problems of capitalism, as well as some concrete solutions to solve them. The main solution presented is the introduction of Workers' self-directed enterprises, or WSDE's. Wolff argues in favor of this change rather persuasively, provoking the reader to question the basics of capitalism itself-its means of production-as well as why a seemingly simple and effective change such as this hasn't already been made. The only negative one can raise is that the whole book is built around the assumption that capitalism is indeed "sick" and that it can be changed from within the system. Granted you accept that assumption the book makes sense.
Adolphine More than 1 year ago
Wolff writes that the capitalistic machine is broken and that it cannot be tinkered with any further to wring out ways to prevent financial crises. This is not a new discovery but the ease with which the insights of historical events were used to explain this, gives the layperson a sound grasp of the workings of the capitalist system. The alternative socio-economic system that is proposed, one that is based on worker-directed enterprises, is intricate; giving way to ebbs and flows of hope. Overall, the book is a good source as a reference for the continued germination of thoughts and actions geared towards addressing socio-economic inequalities.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book consists of two parts: a highly compelling analysis of how the country has gotten into its present economic and political cul de sac, and a proposal for worker-controlled enterprises to alter the dynamics of our economic and political systems. It is worth considering and should attract the involvement of others in developing and promoting the concept. It is weak (because it is a short book) in incorporating and detailing the results of the many experiments in this field, notably the Yugoslav worker management system that was a casualty of the breakup of that country.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book that outlines a way for society to progress from the traditional capitalist organization of production. Its an easy, short read. I recommend it to everyone because the implications of its ideas can help all in society.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago