Democracy in America: The Arthur Goldhammer Translation, Volume One

Overview

Democracy in America is arguably the most perceptive and influential book ever written about American politics and society. The Library of America now presents Arthur Goldhammer's acclaimed translation in a two-volume Paperback Classics edition. Winner of the 2004 Translation Prize awarded by the French-American Foundation, Goldhammer's elegant rendering is the first to capture fully the precision and grace of Tocqueville's style and the full force of his profound ideas and observations. Volume One (1835) and ...

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Overview

Democracy in America is arguably the most perceptive and influential book ever written about American politics and society. The Library of America now presents Arthur Goldhammer's acclaimed translation in a two-volume Paperback Classics edition. Winner of the 2004 Translation Prize awarded by the French-American Foundation, Goldhammer's elegant rendering is the first to capture fully the precision and grace of Tocqueville's style and the full force of his profound ideas and observations. Volume One (1835) and Volume Two (1840) are published separately, each with its own introductory essay by historian Olivier Zunz (Why the American Century?) exploring the creation and evolution of Tocqueville's masterpiece.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781598531510
  • Publisher: Library of America, The
  • Publication date: 2/16/2012
  • Pages: 544
  • Sales rank: 950,724
  • Product dimensions: 5.17 (w) x 7.99 (h) x 1.09 (d)

Meet the Author

Alexis de Tocqueville was born in 1805 to a noble French family that had survived the French Revolution. His father gained some political power under the reign of the Bourbons, and after the July Revolution of 1830, the family was exiled along with the king. Tocqueville, then twenty-five years old, stayed in France, swearing allegiance to the new government. Shortly thereafter he and a friend, Gustave de Beaumont, sought and received a government assignment to study the prison system of the United States. They arrived in America in 1831. After extensive travels across the young nation, Tocqueville wrote Democracy in America (published in two volumes in 1835 and 1840). The publication of the first volume made Tocqueville a well-known figure, but he led a quiet life, accepting modest governmental posts, traveling around Europe, and marrying an Englishwoman. In 1848, Tocqueville once again rose to political prominence after a prescient speech that foretold of revolution. After serving through the massive upheavals and overthrows of government, Tocqueville retired from political life in 1849. Always weak in health, his lung disease grew progressively worse from that period on. Moving south several times on doctor’s recommendations, Tocqueville succumbed to death in 1859, in Cannes.

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Table of Contents

Introduction Olivier Zunz xi

Part I

Chapter 1 The Outward Configuration of North America 21

Chapter 2 On the Point of Departure and Its Importance for the Future of the Anglo-Americans 31

Chapter 3 Social State of the Anglo-Americans 52

Chapter 4 On the Principle of Popular Sovereignty in America 62

Chapter 5 Necessity of Studying What Happens in Particular States Before Speaking of the Government of the Union 66

Chapter 6 On Judicial Power in the United States and Its Effect on Political Society 111

Chapter 7 On Political Judgment in the United States 120

Chapter 8 On the Federal Constitution 126

Part II

Chapter 1 Why It Is Strictly Accurate to Say That in the United States It Is the People Who Govern 197

Chapter 2 Parties in the United States 198

Chapter 3 On Freedom of the Press in the United States 205

Chapter 4 On Political Association in the United States 215

Chapter 5 On the Government of Democracy in America 224

Chapter 6 What Are the Real Advantages to American Society of Democratic Government? 264

Chapter 7 On the Omnipotence of the Majority in the United States and Its Effects 283

Chapter 8 On That Which Tempers the Tyranny of the Majority in the United States 301

Chapter 9 On the Principal Causes That Tend to Maintain the Democratic Republic in the United States 319

Chapter 10 Some Considerations Concerning the Present State and Probable Future of the Three Races That Inhabit the Territory of the United States 365

Tocqueville's Notes 477

Translator's Note 507

Chronology 512

Note on the Texts 542

Notes 544

Index 559

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