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Democratization in Central and Eastern Europe
     

Democratization in Central and Eastern Europe

by Mary Kaldor
 
The enlargement of the European Union eastwards will be one of the dominant issues of the next decade, The European Council in Madrid, in December 1995, announced that the following Central and Eastern European countries (CEEC's) will be eligible for EU membership, provided they meet certain political conditions: Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania,

Overview

The enlargement of the European Union eastwards will be one of the dominant issues of the next decade, The European Council in Madrid, in December 1995, announced that the following Central and Eastern European countries (CEEC's) will be eligible for EU membership, provided they meet certain political conditions: Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Slovenia. The Amsterdam summit in July 1997 acknowledged that these ten countries have made impressive steps, toward democracy and invited five of them (Estonia, Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia) to open negotiations or accession to membership.

The book is an attempt to develop a methodology for assessing the process of democratization as a condition of eligibility for EU membership. The contributors make an important distinction between formal (procedural) democracy and substantive democracy (i.e. democratic political culture) which is impossible to measure even though it can be described. They conclude that whilst the Central and Eastern European countries more or less meet the formal criteria for democracy, they all exhibit weaknesses in substantive democracy.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A dozen essays affirm that there is more to democracy than implied by the Polish Coca-Cola ad on the cover. Derived from a 1995 European Council meeting in Madrid, the contributors' study assesses the eligibility of their Central and East European countries (CEECs) for European Union membership by the criterion of progress toward democratization. Distinguishing between formal and substantive democracy, they conclude that all 10 CEECs have made strides<-->especially the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland, and Slovenia<-->but need further work toward realizing a democratic political culture. The substantial bibliography includes some foreign language titles. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781855675278
Publisher:
Continuum International Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/28/1998
Pages:
209

Meet the Author

Mary Kaldor is Director of the Programme on Global Civil Society at the Centre for the Study of Global Governance, London School of Economics. Among her most recent publications are New and Old Wars: Organized Violence in a Global Era (Polity Press and Stanford University Press 1999) and Global Insecurity (edited) (Continuum 2000).

Ivan Vejvoda is Assistant Professor of Government at Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts.

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