The Demon in the Teahouse

The Demon in the Teahouse

4.5 9
by Tom Hoobler, Dorothy Hoobler
     
 

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Fourteen-year-old Seikei accompanies his foster father, Judge Ooka, to help put out a fire in the city of Edo, military capital of 18th-century Japan. They find evidence that someone has set the fire deliberately, and their quest to find out who that person is leads them to Yoshihara--the shadowy city within a city that only comes alive when the sun goes down. Here

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Overview

Fourteen-year-old Seikei accompanies his foster father, Judge Ooka, to help put out a fire in the city of Edo, military capital of 18th-century Japan. They find evidence that someone has set the fire deliberately, and their quest to find out who that person is leads them to Yoshihara--the shadowy city within a city that only comes alive when the sun goes down. Here Japan's famous geishas live and work, entertaining the rich and powerful. The mystery deepens when the Judge discovers that someone has been murdering geishas, and the rumor has spread that the killer is a demon who cannot be stopped. The Judge assigns Seikei to work in one of the teahouses and get to the heart of the mystery--a task that will test Seikei's courage and resourcefulness to the limit.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940045703994
Publisher:
Tom Hoobler
Publication date:
02/17/2014
Series:
Samurai Detective , #2
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
395,443
File size:
239 KB
Age Range:
13 Years

Meet the Author

Tom Hoobler has published more than 90 books, most of them co-authored with his wife Dorothy. A majority of them were aimed at children or young adults. They won an Edgar for the Best Mystery of 2005 for their book, "In Darkness, Death," a mystery set in 18th-century Japan. Their latest book for adults was "The Crimes of Paris: a True Story of Murder, Theft, and Detection." It is set in Paris between 1900 and 1914, and one of the crimes described in the book is the theft of the Mona Lisa.

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The Demon in the Teahouse 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this in the 3rd grade. At the time, I was pretty much obsessed with Japanese culture and the idea of a Ancient Japan-themed mystery fascinated me. So I checked it out at my local library, read it and loved it. I re-read it and re-read over and over, and kept checking it out until I just went ahead and bought myself a copy. The sheer number of times I read this book should be more than enough to prove what a good book this is. :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read for book lovers willing to dig deep into a mysterious world of a soup seller who goes to great measures to become a samuia's son and fufill all dutys. An ingaging read for people willing to go out of their comfort area and explore intreaging gashas with ingrossing stories. Travel with saikai as he makes his way to worlds he would have never visited but nearly dreamed of. Love sakai as he ignorantly gets cought up with a theif!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When I read this book I checked it out from the library Eight times since then. If you love a good mystery and a little bit of history about another culture I would read these books and the rest of the series. Happy Reading!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The story takes place in ancient Japan, when samurai and ninjas existed. People thought that spirits and demons roamed the earth. This book takes you on an adventure that shows you what life was like back then. In the story, two samurai must find a vicious murderer who is looking for revenge and attacks people just like a demon would. The clues lead the two samurai to the last person they would ever think a suspect. Many of your predictions will be wrong (if you make any) because the book is unpredictable. I love the way that the author describes, with details, how the character feels, and what the enemy looks like. However, it is very annoying the way that the author uses ¡§He must have shown it¡¨ so many times, just like redundant writing. I would recommend this book to you because of its twists and turns, and because it is a book you will most certainly like, especially if you like samurai and detectives storys.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book I have read was ¿The Demon In The Teahouse¿¿by Thomas Hoobler. This book was about the times in Japan when the emperor ruled all. The times of the Samurai, and geishas (like hired dancers). In this book you will discover their world. This book starts out with a boy named Seikei, Son of a merchant, adopted by the great Judge Ooka (like a detective with a good reputation). The protagonist of this story is Seikei, while the antagonist goes unknown until later on in the story. The setting of this story in like I said, in old Tokyo, Japan. Seikei wants very badly to be a Samurai Warrior, but his trainer says he cannot be on account judge Ooka adopted that he. Seikei always asks to hear about the great samurai warrior¿s gods. One that he was amazed by shot 10,000 arrows in one day. While Seikei has a bunch of trouble shooting 50 in a day. Judge Ooka remains faithful in Seikei for to become a samurai so he wants him to continue training. Judge Ooka sends Seikei on his first mission, meaning he has to go apply for a job as a teahouse attendee. To find information on the crime. Which was that 4 Geishas were murdered by burning alive, all wearing the same dress. This crime wouldn¿t have bee brought to Judge Ooka attention if it wasn¿t for the fire being started in Seikei hometown of Edo. All were started mysteriously. Seikei once accepted as the teahouse attendee learns much about danger for the boy who had his k\job before wants it back. Even if it means to kill Seikei. Once Seikei puts a stop this this young boy, it become the biggest breakthrough in his case which leads him to solving it. To get the end of this story you are going to have to read it. I believe this book is a great book if you are into Samurais and old Japanese ways and such. This book is really a good page-turner. I promise you if you read 2 chapters, which aren¿t very long, you will not be able to put this book down. It has a great story line and character development.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. Though I disliked some parts of it, I really enjoyed a look into Japan's history -- and especially the geishas and samurai. The plot is well written, too. I recommend it to anyone who loves historical fiction and mysteries.