Demon Knights Volume 1: Seven Against the Dark (The New 52)

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Overview

Set in the Dark Ages of the DC Universe, a barbarian horde is massing to crush civilization. It's fallen to Madame Xanadu and Jason Blood, the man with a monster inside him, to stand in their way–though the demon Etrigan has no interest in protecting anyone or anything other than himself! It'll take more than their own power to stop an army fueled by bloodlust and dark sorcery, and some very surprising heroes–and villains–will have no choice but to join the fray!

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Demon Knights Volume 1: Seven Against the Dark (The New 52) (NOOK Comics with Zoom View)

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Overview

Set in the Dark Ages of the DC Universe, a barbarian horde is massing to crush civilization. It's fallen to Madame Xanadu and Jason Blood, the man with a monster inside him, to stand in their way–though the demon Etrigan has no interest in protecting anyone or anything other than himself! It'll take more than their own power to stop an army fueled by bloodlust and dark sorcery, and some very surprising heroes–and villains–will have no choice but to join the fray!

This volume collect issues 1-7 of Demon Knights, part of the DC Comics—The New 52 event.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"DEMON KNIGHTS has perfectly positioned Etrigan for the 21st-century fantasy addicts that have made HBO's adaptation of George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones a crossover phenomenon." - Wired/Underwire
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781401234720
  • Publisher: DC Comics
  • Publication date: 7/17/2012
  • Series: The New 52
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 405,850
  • Product dimensions: 6.66 (w) x 10.02 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Cornell is a British writer best known for his work in television drama Dr. Who and as the creator of one of the Doctor's spin-off companions. He has written for other television dramas including Robin Hood, Primeval, Casualty, Holby City and Coronation Street. His comics work includes ACTION COMICS, KNIGHT & SQUIRE, STORMWATCH and DEMON KNIGHTS for DC Comics, as well as Captain Britain and MI-13, Black Widow: Deadly Origin and Dark X-Men for Marvel Comics.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    It's no secret that I am a huge "Arthurian" fan. Nor i

    It's no secret that I am a huge "Arthurian" fan. Nor is it a secret that I'm a big fan of DC's supernatural characters. So a combination of the two should be a sort of perfect storm for me. And while I'm intrigued by the story being developed by Cornell, Neves and Albert and the rest of the creators ... I'm not completely sold yet. This volume left me feeling like there was something missing.

    Part of it might be my misunderstanding of the intended concept, I'll admit. I thought going in that this was going to be set either in Camelot or slightly after Camelot's fall, rather than several centuries later. I was a bit disappointed when I realized just how big a time jump the narrative was taking. Part of it might be that of course it's an origin story, and so seven issues are taken to establish the characters and their conflicts (this, from what I've been told, has been the norm for The New 52, especially for the team books) and while that's interesting, the story ends up feeling a bit stagnant.

    Now, what I liked about the book: the combination of new and revamped characters. Jack Kirby's Jason Blood / Etrigan The Demon in a love-triangle with the Matt Wagner version of Madame Xanadu? Intriguing. A Visigoth-era Vandal Savage, bulked out and more than a bit devious? Not my favorite take on the character, but it'll do. New characters Al Jabr (the Muslim inventor), Exoristes (an exiled Amazon who looks an awful lot like the pre-52 version of Queen Hippolyta), and The Horsewoman (nameless and with a mysterious malady)? All interesting enough to make me want to know more about them. The only weak link for me is that they're using the Grant Morrison version of The Shining Knight. I'm one of those who thought his Seven Soldiers was a garbled mess and the female-pretending-to-be-male Sir Ystin felt more garbled than the rest. I don't usually have a problem with "legacy" characters carrying on former heroes names ... but this is one time I wish we'd have been given the original version of the character. Maybe he will make an appearance eventually. There's no rule saying there can't be more than one Shining Knight running around. (I'd also been hoping to see what Cornell might do with the mute Brian Kent, the Silent Knight, but he's not present either).

    As for the plot, I'm probably not spoiling anything to say that most of the book takes place in a beseiged town, and that the Knights end up fending off the army of someone called The Questing Queen, who seems to have taken Mordred as her lover and kept him alive long after Camelot fell. I won't spoil what the Questing Queen is actually in search of, though.

    While I don't think this was the strongest debut of a new comic series, I enjoyed it enough that I'll pick up Volume Two whenever DC gets around to collecting the next seven issues.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 10, 2012

    Love it

    A book that whene first heard about haed hard time to figering out what place it would have in the new 52 and set thousands of years in the past but with great writing and aert this seris has made it own place

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2012

    It's a great fantasy story starring a team of imperfect heroes.

    It's a great fantasy story starring a team of imperfect heroes. The story starts off a little choppy, but really picks up after the first issue. I highly recommend this to any fantasy fans.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2012

    Great artwork, story lacks depth.

    Villians were well represented, all other characters were a bit shallow, Horsewoman is intetesting enough to wait for the next release.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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