Demon Theory

( 5 )

Overview

A psychological tale of cinematic horror.

On Halloween night, following an unnerving phone call from his diabetic mother, Hale and six of his med school classmates return to the house where his sister disappeared years ago. While there is no sign of his mother, something is waiting for them there, and has been waiting a long time.

Written as a literary film treatment littered with footnotes and obscure nuances, Demon Theory is even parts camp ...

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Demon Theory

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Overview

A psychological tale of cinematic horror.

On Halloween night, following an unnerving phone call from his diabetic mother, Hale and six of his med school classmates return to the house where his sister disappeared years ago. While there is no sign of his mother, something is waiting for them there, and has been waiting a long time.

Written as a literary film treatment littered with footnotes and obscure nuances, Demon Theory is even parts camp and terror, combining glib dialogue, fascinating pop culture references, and an intricate subtext as it pursues the events of a haunting movie trilogy too real to dismiss.

There are books about movies and movies about books, and then there’s Demon Theory–a refreshing and occasionally shocking addition to the increasingly popular “intelligent horror” genre.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781596921641
  • Publisher: MacAdam/Cage Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/28/2006
  • Pages: 303
  • Product dimensions: 14.50 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephen Graham Jones is the author of All the Beautiful Sinners, The Bird Is Gone: A Manifesto, The Fast Red Road: A Plainsong, and Bleed into Me: A Book of Stories. He is an associate professor of English at Texas Technical University.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2007

    Of Demons and Intellectualism

    If Stephen Graham Jones¿ wickedly clever 'Demon Theory' were to ever be made into an actual film, the witty tagline might go something like this: 'Someone has taken his love of MLA too far'. Culled from the fictional case notes of the fictional Dr. Neider at the equally imaginary Owl Creek Mental Facilities, 'Demon Theory' is presented as a three-part novelization of the movie trilogy 'The Devil Inside', based on the (you guessed it) fictional best-selling novel inspired by said notes. Part literary film treatment, part pop culture lexicon, 'Demon Theory' tells a triptych of interconnected stories (imagined here as sequels) concerning a group of Midwestern med school pals and their encounters with the nasty titular creatures. Imagine throwing 'Jeepers Creepers', the 'Scream' films, TV¿s 'Grey¿s Anatomy', and Paul Thomas Anderson¿s 'Magnolia' into a blender and mixing on high. The layers of Jones' narrative unfurl at just the right moments throughout when the reader¿s mind has been gloriously stretched to its outer limits keeping track of this richly plotted tale. Using liberal doses of footnotes as the literary equivalent of pop-up videos, Jones creates a blood-soaked textbook of pop culture reference and epitomized post-modernism with 'Demon Theory'. He fashions a unique literary hybrid ¿ part novel, part reference book ¿ and seemingly satirizes the post-'Scream' self-awareness of the horror genre while lovingly chronicling it down to its last obscure nuance one footnoted annotation at a time. But in between the definition of retroactive continuity, Clive Barker quotes, deliberations of who rightfully deserves the first scream queen title, and the etymology of the word bumf..k, Jones powers through a gripping narrative rich with convincing dialogue, atmospheric suspense, and an ample gore quotient. Lazy readers beware 'Demon Theory' is the anti-beach read. Jones challenges with an intricate read, at times frustrating and distracting until readers hit their stride shifting from footnote to narrative and back again against the backdrop of screenplay jargon. Although Jones offers no easy mass-market thrill rides here, the payoffs are well worth the workout of little gray cells. The ingenuity of 'Demon Theory' is the true marvel at work here, presenting as the intellectual literary cousin of Wes Craven¿s 'Scream' trilogy. This cerebral terror trip is made even more so by Jones¿ staunch refusal to lay his cards out on the table as to whether 'Demon Theory' is an application of intellectualism to the horror genre or tongue-in-cheek boyhood homage to a genre he clearly loves. No, he¿s far too skilled a writer for that, his 'Demon Theory' far too superior a novel.

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    Posted January 24, 2011

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    Posted March 2, 2011

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    Posted January 1, 2010

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    Posted March 22, 2011

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