Demons: A Novel in Three Parts (Pevear / Volokhonsky Translation)

Demons: A Novel in Three Parts (Pevear / Volokhonsky Translation)

4.9 14
by Fyodor Dostoevsky
     
 

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Inspired by the true story of a political murder that horried Russians in 1869, Fyodor Dostoevsky conceived of Demons as a "novel-pamphlet" in which he would say everything about the plague of materialist ideology that he saw infecting his native land. What emerged was a prophetic and ferociously funny masterpiece of ideology and murder in

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Overview

Inspired by the true story of a political murder that horried Russians in 1869, Fyodor Dostoevsky conceived of Demons as a "novel-pamphlet" in which he would say everything about the plague of materialist ideology that he saw infecting his native land. What emerged was a prophetic and ferociously funny masterpiece of ideology and murder in pre-revolutionary Russia.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“[An] admirable new translation of…Dostoevsky’s masterpiece.” –New York Review of Books

“The merit in this edition of Demons resides in the technical virtuosity of the translators…They capture the feverishly intense, personal explosions of activity and emotion that manifest themselves in Russian life.” –New York Times Book Review

Demons is the Dostoevsky novel for our age…[Pevear and Volokhonsky] have managed to capture and differentiate the characters’ many voices…They come into their own when faced with Dostoevsky’s wonderfully quirky use of varied speech patterns…A capital job of restoration.” –Los Angeles Times

With an Introduction by Richard Pevear

Library Journal
Pevear and Volokhonsky have found critical acclaim with previous translations of Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov (Classic Returns, LJ 8/90), Crime and Punishment (Classic Returns, LJ 1/92), and Notes from Underground (Classic Returns, LJ 7/93). Their Demons should be equally respected.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679734512
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/1995
Series:
Vintage Classics Series
Pages:
768
Sales rank:
165,312
Product dimensions:
5.12(w) x 7.99(h) x 1.48(d)

Meet the Author

About the Translators

   Richard Pevear has published translations of Alain, Yves Bonnefoy, Albert Savinio, and Pavel Florensky, as well as two books of poetry.  He has received fellowships for translation from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support of the translation of The Brothers Karamazov. Larissa Volokhonsky was born in Leningrad.  She has translated the work of the prominent Orthodox theologians Alexander Schmemann and John Meyendorff.

   Pevear and Volokhonsky were awarded the PEN Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize for their version of The Brothers Karamazov. They are married and live in France

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Demons: A Novel in Three Parts (Pevear / Volokhonsky Translation) 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Fayadh More than 1 year ago
Simply, a masterpiece in a league of its own.

This ardent criticism that Dostoevsky has so masterfully weaved will forever have a place in the hearts of those who read it critically and spend time to understand the purpose behind every action.

Definitely something you would want to read in your lifetime...

*The Pevear / Volokhonsky Translation is the best one around.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am in the process of finishing this novel and I have to say that it is one of my favorite novels. It is witty, yet deep, which makes an intriguing piece of work. I absolutely enjoyed this and believe I gained much insight into the workings and perspective of Russian society of that time. A must read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Perhaps his best novel. If I had to recommend a Dostoevsky novel to someone who wanted to read him for the first time, it would probably be this one. More sophisticated and entertaining than Crime and Punishment, but in my opinion far more approachable and easy to read than The Idiot or The Brothers Karamazov. The characters are well developed and easy to relate to, and on top of that the story is extremely engaging throughout, with many unforeseen twists and turns. Honestly once the book was finished I still wanted to read more, which is a sure sign of a good read. As with all the other Dostoevsky novels I've read, I found the Pevear / Volokhonsky translation to be the best. It's worth paying the extra money to read this version, rather than the outdated Garrett translation.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Protects th city and everything else.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He attacked devil and slit her throut...the demons saw devil and all piled on zac and attacked him...pulled on his fur and his ears and tail..then retreated...jason chad and michael draged him back to camp...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Follows
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nods."I swear."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TD_Books More than 1 year ago
A clever combination of tragedy and comedy, this is the most engaging and approachable of Dostoyevsky's longer masterpieces, and is translated by the masters of classic Russian lit translation. (Typing this on my phone, so unlike this wonderful author, I'll be brief).)
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The girl came alone. She sat on a tree stump, turning on her phone and checking her mail.