The Denial of Aging: Perpetual Youth, Eternal Life, and Other Dangerous Fantasies

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 92%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $7.95   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$7.95
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(999)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2006-03-31 Hardcover New NEW-IT IS BRAND NEW-and in its NEW dust cover. It is free from any foreign markings.

Ships from: Rockford, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$65.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Listen to a short interview with Dr. Muriel Gillick

Host: Chris Gondek | Producer: Heron & Crane

You've argued politics with your aunt since high school, but failing eyesight now prevents her from keeping current with the newspaper. Your mother fractured her hip last year and is confined to a wheelchair. Your father has Alzheimer's and only occasionally recognizes you.

Someday, as Muriel Gillick points out in this important yet unsettling book, you too will be old. And no matter what vitamin regimen you're on now, you will likely one day find yourself sick or frail. How do you prepare? What will you need?

With passion and compassion, Gillick chronicles the stories of elders who have struggled with housing options, with medical care decisions, and with finding meaning in life. Skillfully incorporating insights from medicine, health policy, and economics, she lays out action plans for individuals and for communities. In addition to doing all we can to maintain our health, we must vote and organize—for housing choices that consider autonomy as well as safety, for employment that utilizes the skills and wisdom of the elderly, and for better management of disability and chronic disease.

Most provocatively, Gillick argues against desperate attempts to cure the incurable. Care should focus on quality of life, not whether it can be prolonged at any cost.

"A good old age," writes Gillick, "is within our grasp." But we must reach in the right direction.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
From diets to cutting-edge diagnostic technology, Americans spend billions of dollars-not to mention untold hours of anxiety-staving off the aging process. In this readable examination of growing old and learning to live with it, Gillick, a Harvard Medical School associate professor, is pitiless as she critiques the current medical mantra of "health maintenance," observing that warding off death via endless testing and dangerous invasive procedures is "a hopeless and counterproductive aim" hurting, rather than helping, the elderly. She persuasively argues for "intermediate care," "a middle ground between maximally aggressive care and exclusively comfort-oriented care" involving, among other things, less expensive screening for some ailments after a certain age and, when possible, treating patients at home. This means fewer trips to the emergency room and fewer admissions to hospitals, which, in addition to being the most expensive means of delivering health care, also have proven to be places where the elderly actually suffer unnecessarily and often die prematurely. Gillick concludes that "a good old age is within our grasp," provided we rethink our approach to urgent or acute care, provide compassionate support to the elderly, and accept the fact that no one lives forever. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Age and Ageing
It is not easy to review a book that is as good as this one as there is so much to say that is positive about this book and almost nothing by way of criticism. ...[T]his humane and compassionate book captures and retains the reader's interest throughout. It examines the denial of ageing and the associated "dangerous fantasies": if we continue to deny the realities of old age, we will, as a society, put our money into futile and expensive treatments, and will not have money left over to provide the beneficial care that older people actually need. It goes on to look at all the things that can contribute to a best possible old age, including appropriate medical care, housing support, a sense of purpose and meaningful activities. It does this for each segment of the older population, comprising "the robust, the frail and the dying." Best of all, it does all this with an impeccable blend of analysis, hard evidence and narrative about the lives of real people...In sum, this is a book that should be read by everyone who is interested in old age, and particularly, by those who allocate resources or deliver care.
— Ros Levenson
Harvard Medical Alumni Bulletin
Gillick's reasoning is so efficient and well placed, and she illustrates it so well with cases...Her detailed descriptions are dazzling in their sensibleness...[She] is the informed, compassionate, realistic gerontologist you want for your grandmother, your mother, and eventually--if she is not too old by then--yourself.

— Elissa Ely

Hastings Center Report
Gillick’s book could not appear at a better time. We should send a copy to every member of Congress, as well as to all those doctors peddling bogus antiaging remedies. Readers need her message more than ever, but, alas, they seem unlikely to hear it at all as they rush to pick up prescriptions for human growth hormone, antioxidants, or other “dangerous fantasies” that Gillick decries.
— Harry R. Moody
Nature
Americans, [Gillick] asserts, squander resources on quackery and on futile but expensive treatments for people approaching the end of their lives, and risk not leaving enough money for more beneficial care....Gillick's book raises important issues in a lucid and accessible style. The reader cannot help feeling that the problems of aging and longevity could be effectively dealt with by informed and intelligent political leadership.
— John Grimley Evans
People
Blame it on graying boomers, medical advances or Hollywood: Americans are spending billions a year trying to stay young. Snap out of it, urges Dr. Muriel R. Gillick, and focus on things like overhauling Medicare. Read it before scheduling that facelift.
The Messenger-Press
This is quite an amazing book. It ranks at the top of my "most important books to read" list--for people of all ages and, most particularly, those with political power. Gillick confronts tough topics with gentle wisdom. Nursing homes, right-to-life issues for the aging, Medicare morass. She lays bare painful situations and moral dilemmas and offers sound, practical advice to the anguished plea, "But what can we do?" All this and it is easy to read...Gillick is on the cutting edge of issues that our entire society must face. For Boomers, for Gen X and Gen Y, for politicians who determine how we spend tax dollars on Medicare and health funding, this is a must-read book.
— Joan Ruddiman
Washington Post Book World
[Gillick] challenges her generation to embrace the inevitability of aging and to make the most of it.
— Tom Graham
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674021488
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Muriel R. Gillick, M.D. is Clinical Professor of Ambulatory Care and Prevention at Harvard Medical School. She is a staff physician for Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, and she is also on the medical staff of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Faulkner Hospital.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 An ounce of prevention? 11
2 When less is more 37
3 Doing the right thing near the end 63
4 The trouble with Medicare 93
5 Is a nursing home in your future? 123
6 Assisted living : boon or boondoggle? 159
7 The lure of immortality 195
8 Making the most of the retirement years 225
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.


If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)