Dependent-Arising and Emptiness: A Tibetan Buddhist Interpretation of Madhyamika Philosophy

Overview

Dependent-arising and emptiness are two essential Buddhist concepts. Elizabeth Napper helps us understand the integral relationship of these ideas and the ways that they have been interpreted by Tibetan and Western scholars. An essential reference work for students and practitioners of Buddhism.

Along with a translation of the insight (vipashyana) section of Tsongkhapa's Great Exposition on the Stages of the Path (Lam rim chen mo), Napper provides an extensive introduction that ...

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Overview

Dependent-arising and emptiness are two essential Buddhist concepts. Elizabeth Napper helps us understand the integral relationship of these ideas and the ways that they have been interpreted by Tibetan and Western scholars. An essential reference work for students and practitioners of Buddhism.

Along with a translation of the insight (vipashyana) section of Tsongkhapa's Great Exposition on the Stages of the Path (Lam rim chen mo), Napper provides an extensive introduction that contrasts the Geluk view of emptiness to that of Western scholars, and a translation of four interwoven commentaries on the text.

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Editorial Reviews

B. Alan Wallace
"This work is academically rigorous and comprehensive, with meticulous attention to the subtleties of the Madhyamika view as formulated in the great tradition of Tsongkhapa. This is a wonderful resource for scholars and practitioners alike who wish to deepen their understanding of the way all phenomena arise as dependently related events. I recommend it wholeheartedly."
Jose Ignacio Cabezon
"Few works have stood the test of time the way that Dr. Napper's work has. After decades of scholarship on the theory and practice of emptiness in the West, Dependent Arising and Emptiness, because of its tremendous clarity and comprehensiveness, still stands out as one of the gems."
Thupten Jinpa
"Through a detailed study of Tsongkhapa's understanding of emptiness and his critiques of rival interpretations, Elizabeth Napper examines the Tibetan interpretation of Nagarjuna's highly influential Middle Way philosophy. Napper does not remain content with mere description, however; to assist the modern reader she brings the core of the debates into dialogue with contemporary philosophical literature on the relationship between logic, language, and reality. A must for anyone who is interested in Madhyamaka philosophy."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780861713646
  • Publisher: Wisdom Publications MA
  • Publication date: 7/10/2005
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 868
  • Sales rank: 1,415,000
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 8.24 (h) x 1.43 (d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Napper received her PhD in Buddhist Studies from the University of Virginia in 1985. The editor of such books as Kindness, Clarity, and Insight by the Dalai Lama and Mind in Tibetan Buddhism, she is currently codirector of the Tibetan Nuns Project in Dharamsala, India.

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Table of Contents

Preface to Second Edition
Acknowledgements
Technical Notes
Pt. 1 Analysis
1 An Overview of the Great Exposition 17
2 Interpretation of Scripture 30
3 Dzong-ka-ba's Argument 39
4 Dzong-ka-ba and Modern Interpreters I: Not Negating Enough 67
5 Dzong-ka-ba and Modern Interpreters II: Negating Too Much 101
6 Dzong-ka-ba and Modern Interpreters III: Other Issues of Difference 123
7 Summation: Emptiness and Ethic 143
Pt. 2 Translation of Dzong-ka-ba's Great Exposition
1 The Interpretable and the Definitive 158
2 Reliable Sources 164
3 The Stages of Entry Into Suchness 168
4 Misidentifying the Object of Negation 176
5 The Uncommon Feature of Madhyamika 181
6 Dependent-Arising and Emptiness 188
7 Madhyamika Response 198
Pt. 3 Translation of the Four Interwoven Annotations
1 The Interpretable and the Definitive 247
2 Reliable Sources 268
3 The Stages of Entry Into Suchness 284
4 Misidentifying the Object of Negation 311
5 The Uncommon Feature of Madhyamika 322
6 Dependent-Arising and Emptiness 339
7 Madhyamika Response 361
App. 1 The Division of Madhyamikas into Reason-Established Illusionists and Proponents of Thorough Non-Abiding 403
App. 2 Alex Wayman's Translation Considered 441
App. 3 Jan-yang-shay-ba's Outline 474
App. 4 Emendations to the Delhi Edition of the Four Interwoven Annotations 499
Glossary 1 English-Tibetan-Sanskrit 527
Glossary 2 Tibetan-Sanskrit-English 550
Glossary 3 Sanskrit-Tibetan-English 574
Bibliography 595
Notes 641
Index 825
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