Der Wohlstand der Nationen [NOOK Book]

Overview

Eine Untersuchung über die Natur und die Ursachen der Wohlstand der Nationen, ist das Magnum Opus der schottische Nationalökonom und Moralphilosoph
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Der Wohlstand der Nationen

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$2.99
BN.com price

Overview

Eine Untersuchung über die Natur und die Ursachen der Wohlstand der Nationen, ist das Magnum Opus der schottische Nationalökonom und Moralphilosoph
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

GoodReads - Erik Graff
Eine stolze und ehrgeizige junge, hörten, daß Präsident Kennedy hatte ein Leser, ich Schnitt Rasenflächen und geschaufelt Wanderungen zu bezahlen für ein Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics-Programm. Wir trafen uns im Ersatz Keller der abscheulichen moderne Struktur, die durch die Nutzung in der Nähe von O' Hare International Airport-Airlines für Park Ridge "Inn"--eine Residenz in erster Linie für Telefonzentralen und Piloten übergeben. Ich
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016504346
  • Publisher: Nook Classics
  • Publication date: 6/8/2013
  • Language: German
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 1254
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Ein schottischer Moralphilosoph und ein Pionier der politischen Ökonomie. Eine der Schlüsselfiguren der schottischen Aufklärung, Smith ist Autor von The Theory of Moral Sentiments und An Inquiry into the Nature and Ursachen der Wohlstand der Nationen. Letzteres, meist abgekürzt als der Wohlstand der Nationen, gilt als sein Opus Magnum und das erste moderne Werk der Wirtschaft. Adam Smith wird weithin als der Vater der modernen Wirtschaft zitiert.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2013

    Adam Smith is as relevant today and he was when the Wealth of Na

    Adam Smith is as relevant today and he was when the Wealth of Nations was published in 1976. Smith was able to look at the world around him and then explain in great detail how barriers to free trade hurt the very people for whose benefit the barriers were erected. I wish that all 9th graders were required to read the Wealth of Nations because they will have to grow up and live in the world Adam Smith described and not the world our public school systems describe. My favorite section of text is:




    "As every individual, therefore, endeavours as much as he can, both to employ his capital in the support of domestic industry, and so to direct that industry that its produce maybe of the greatest value; every individual necessarily labours to render the annual revenue of the society as great as he can.




    He generally, indeed, neither intends to promote the public interest, nor knows how much he is promoting it. By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain; and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention. Nor is it always the worse for the society that it was no part of it. By pursuing his own interest, he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it.




    I have never known much good done by those who affected to trade for the public good. It is an affectation, indeed, not very common among merchants, and very few words need be employed in dissuading them from it" (Smith, 1776/2003, p. 572).




    I wholeheartedly recommend this book. Cheers, Larry

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2013

    Fig

    Humps.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

    Nero

    Walks to the charging pod

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2013

    Shauna

    The human walked in.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

    Sarah

    She sighed "when is that numbskull gonna get here...." she mutters a man walked in"sorry i am late shall we start sarah?" Sarah loojed at him. "Bout time" they went to rex two

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)