Desert Terroir: Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands [NOOK Book]

Overview

Why does food taste better when you know where it comes from? Because history-ecological, cultural, even personal-flavors every bite we eat. Whether it's the volatile chemical compounds that a plant absorbs from the soil or the stories and memories of places that are evoked by taste, layers of flavor await those willing to delve into the roots of real food. In this landmark book, Gary Paul Nabhan takes us on a personal trip into the southwestern borderlands to discover the terroir-the "taste of the place"-that ...
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Desert Terroir: Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands

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Overview

Why does food taste better when you know where it comes from? Because history-ecological, cultural, even personal-flavors every bite we eat. Whether it's the volatile chemical compounds that a plant absorbs from the soil or the stories and memories of places that are evoked by taste, layers of flavor await those willing to delve into the roots of real food. In this landmark book, Gary Paul Nabhan takes us on a personal trip into the southwestern borderlands to discover the terroir-the "taste of the place"-that makes this desert so delicious. To savor the terroir of the borderlands, Nabhan presents a cornucopia of local foods-Mexican oregano, mesquite-flour tortillas, grass-fed beef, the popular Mexican dessert capirotada, and corvina (croaker or drum fish) among them-as well as food experiences that range from the foraging of Cabeza de Vaca and his shipwrecked companions to a modern-day camping expedition on the Rio Grande. Nabhan explores everything from the biochemical agents that create taste in these foods to their history and dispersion around the world. Through his field adventures and humorous stories, we learn why Mexican oregano is most potent when gathered at the most arid margins of its range-and why foods found in the remote regions of the borderlands have surprising connections to foods found by his ancestors in the deserts of the Mediterranean and the Middle East. By the end of his movable feast, Nabhan convinces us that the roots of this fascinating terroir must be anchored in our imaginations as well as in our shifting soils.
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Editorial Reviews

Times Literary Supplement
One of Napa Valley’s most prestigious winemakers recently said that there is no such thing as terroir. He scoffed at the idea… that wine somehow captures the essence of place. A scientist by training, he insisted instead that wine is the result of chemical processes that can be analysed and controlled, nothing more. Gary Paul Nabhan’s new book, Desert Terroir: Exploring the unique flavors and sundry places of the borderlands, is an eloquent refutation of that assertion. Like other proponents of terroir, Nabhan argues that sunlight, wind, rain and minerals in the soil all affect the way a given food tastes. But for him there is more. Terroir is also an expression of the hands of the women who rhythmically pat out tortillas in the borderlands between the United States and Mexico, and of the labours of ranch hands who graze sturdy Corriente cattle. It is found, too, in the ancestry of both human and plants. If we attune ourselves to our own history, and to that of the natural world, we stand to gain a keen appreciation for our planet’s myriad distinctive tastes… Nabhan is a natural storyteller.
Library Journal
Terroir is a term used to describe how characteristics of the land affect the flavors of the foods produced from it. Prolific author Nabhan (Coming Home To Eat: The Pleasures and Politics of Local Food) attempts to discover what creates the unique terroir of the desert borderlands of Mexico and the United States. In his travels throughout the borderlands, he is introduced to local foods such as wild oregano, prickly pear cactus, mesquite tortillas, and a Mexican breed of cattle. Nabhan explains how the desert ecology, such as the soil and water (or lack thereof), affects the tastes of these foods. He also explores how cultural history can affect terroir, tracing the history of the Spanish and Arab immigrants to the region. VERDICT Although a few other titles explore terroir, Nabhan's focus on the desert borderlands brings a distinctive perspective to this topic. Despite a somewhat uneven narrative, this quick read will appeal to ardent foodies interested in this particular region and its foods.—Melissa Stoeger, Deerfield P.L., IL
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780292742840
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • Publication date: 5/10/2012
  • Series: Ellen and Edward Randall Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

Gary Paul Nabhan is an internationally celebrated desert explorer, plant hunter, and storyteller of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, as well as a pioneer in the local foods movement. Nabhan is author or editor of twenty-four books, including Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail, The Desert Smells Like Rain, and Coming Home to Eat. This book reunites him with Paul Mirocha, the illustrator and co-conspirator of their award-winning Gathering the Desert. Nabhan has received a MacArthur “genius” fellowship and the Vavilov Medal, and he currently holds an endowed chair in sustainable food systems at the University of Arizona. At his home near the Mexican border, he tends an orchard of heirloom fruits and heritage crops.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Prologue
Chapter One. The Verve in the Herb: A Culinary Natural History
Chapter Two. Hungry for Home: Mostafa al-Azemmouri Discovers a New World of Desert Foods
Chapter Three. Seek-No-Further: Foraging and Fishing through the Big Bend
Chapter Four. A Flour Blooms: Esperanza and the Magical Mesquite Tortillas
Chapter Five. From the Beeves' Lips to Paul's Fears: Grass-Fed Flavor
Chapter Six. Pan on a Mission: Capirotada Comes to Baja California
Chapter Seven. Camel Chorizo: A Missing Link
Chapter Eight. My First (and Last) Rodeo: Catching Corvina in the Sea of Cortés
Chapter Nine. A Desert Communion
Epilogue
Literature Cited
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