The Design And Implementation Of Multimedia Software With Examples In Java / Edition 1

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Overview

Multimedia is hot and, as a result, there are many books with the word “multimedia” in the title. The Design and Implementation of Multimedia Software with Examples in Java is intended for software engineers and object-oriented programmers who are interested in designing and developing multimedia software. At a high level, it discusses the physics, biology and psychology of visual and auditory perception and the implications of these processes for the characterization of multimedia software. At an intermediate level, it discusses the use of various patterns in the design of multimedia software. At a lower level, it discusses different ways of adding multimedia functionality to applications of various kinds. It can be viewed as both a book about multimedia software that uses object-oriented design/programming, and a book about object-oriented design/programming that happens to use visual and auditory examples (such as image processing, vector graphics, video, animation, audio processing, and musical scores).
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763778125
  • Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning
  • Publication date: 6/4/2010
  • Edition description: 1E
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 372
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Part I Introduction 1

1 Background 3

1.1 Software Design 3

1.1.1 Engineering Design and Systems Theory 3

1.1.2 Engineering Design and Problem Solving 5

1.1.3 Object-Oriented Design 5

1.1.4 Object-Oriented Design and Set Theory 6

1.1.5 Object-Oriented Design and Semiotics 7

1.2 Multimedia 7

1.2.1 Etymology 8

1.2.2 Common Usage 8

1.2.3 Creating a Better Definition 9

1.3 A Brief Introduction to Waves 10

1.3.1 Mechanical Waves 11

1.3.2 Waves in the Position Domain 12

1.3.3 Waves in the Time Domain 14

1.3.4 Waves in the Frequency Domain 15

1.4 The Focus of This Book 16

1.5 Engineering Design Practices 17

1.5.1 Characterizing Good Software Engineering Designs 17

1.5.2 Software Engineering Design Practices 18

2 Event-Driven Programming 21

2.1 Introduction 21

2.2 Event-Driven Designs 22

2.3 The Event Queue and Dispatch Thread in Java 22

2.4 GUIs and GUI Events 23

2.4.1 Components 23

2.4.2 Containers 24

2.4.3 Layout 25

2.4.4 A Simple Example with a GUI 26

2.4.5 GUI Event Handling 28

2.4.6 An Example with a GUI and Event Handling 29

2.5 Timed Events 30

2.5.1 Implementing a Metronome Class 30

2.5.2 A Simple Example with Timed Events 36

3 Programs 43

3.1 Java Programs 43

3.1.1 Applications 44

3.1.2 Applets 46

3.2 A Unified Approach for Multimedia 48

3.2.1 Unifying Applications and Applets 49

3.2.2 Program Resources 63

3.2.3 A Simple Example Revisited 65

Part II Visual Content 71

4 Visual Content 73

4.1 Light 73

4.2 Vision 74

4.3 Visual Perception 76

4.3.1 Brightness 76

4.3.2 Color 76

4.3.3 Depth and Distance 77

4.3.4 Motion 79

4.4 Visual Output Devices 80

4.4.1 Display Spaces 80

4.4.2 Coordinate Systems 80

4.4.3 Aspect Ratio and Orientation 81

4.4.4 Color Models and Color Spaces 82

4.5 Rendering 83

4.5.1 Coordinate Transformation 84

4.5.2 Clipping 86

4.5.3 Composition 86

4.5.4 Obtaining a Rendering Engine 87

4.6 Designing a Visual Content System 88

4.6.1 Alternative Designs 89

4.6.2 Implementing the Design 93

4.6.3 Adding Transformations 103

5 Sampled Static Visual Content 111

5.1 A 'Quick Start' 111

5.2 Encapsulating Sampled Static Visual Content 115

5.3 Operating on Sampled Static Visual Content 120

5.3.1 Convolutions 127

5.3.2 Affine Transformations 139

5.3.3 Lookups 141

5.3.4 Resealing 142

5.3.5 Color Space Conversion 143

5.3.6 Cropping/Cutting 143

5.4 Design of a Sampled Static Visual Content System 143

6 Described Static Visual Content 155

6.1 A 'Quick Start' 155

6.2 Encapsulating Simple Geometric Shapes 157

6.2.1 0-Dimensional Shapes 157

6.2.2 1-Dimensional Shapes 157

6.2.3 2-Dimensional Shapes 160

6.3 Encapsulating Glyphs and Fonts 163

6.3.1 Glyphs as Shapes 163

6.3.2 Measuring Glyphs and Fonts 164

6.3.3 Convenience Methods 166

6.4 Encapsulating Complicated Geometric Shapes 167

6.5 Operating on Multiple Shapes 168

6.6 Operating on individual Shapes 169

6.7 Rendering Described Content 172

6.8 Design of a Described Static Visual Content System 175

7 A Static Visual Content System 187

7.1 Design Alternatives Ignoring Content Types 187

7.2 Design Alternatives Incorporating Content Types 189

7.2.1 The visual.statik Package 193

7.2.2 The visual.statik.sampled Package 196

7.2.3 The visual.statik.described Package 197

7.3 Some Examples 199

7.3.1 An Example of described. CompositeContent 199

7.3.2 An Example of Mixed CompositeContent 201

7.3.3 An Example of a Visualization 202

7.3.4 An Example of Multiple Visualizations 204

8 Sampled Dynamic Visual Content 209

8.1 A 'Quick Start' 210

8.2 Encapsulating Sampled Dynamic Content 217

8.3 Rendering Individual Frames 219

8.4 Operating on Multiple Frames 221

8.4.1 Fades 222

8.4.2 Dissolves 223

8.4.3 Wipes 224

8.5 Operating on Individual Frames 226

8.6 Design of a Sampled Dynamic Visual Content System 229

9 Described Dynamic Visual Content 243

9.1 A 'Quick Start' 243

9.2 Encapsulating Rule-Based Dynamics 256

9.2.1 Sprite Interactions 256

9.2.2 User Interaction 263

9.3 Encapsulating Key-Time Dynamics 267

9.3.1 Location and Rotation Tweening 269

9.3.2 Tweening Samples and Descriptions 275

Part III Auditory Content 287

10 Auditory Content 289

10.1 Sound 289

10.2 Hearing 291

10.3 Auditory Perception 292

10.3.1 Volume 292

10.3.2 Pitch 292

10.3.3 Timbre 293

10.3.4 Localization 293

10.3.5 Complex Wave Forms 294

10.3.6 Noise 294

10.3.7 Reverberation 294

10.4 Auditory Output Devices 295

10.5 Rendering 295

10.6 Designing an Auditory Content System 295

11 Sampled Auditory Content 299

11.1 A 'Quick Start' 300

11.2 Encapsulating Sampled Auditory Content 302

11.3 Operating on Sampled Auditory Content 312

11.3.1 Addition 317

11.3.2 Reversal 320

11.3.3 Inversion 320

11.3.4 Filters 321

11.4 Presenting Sampled Auditory Content 324

11.5 Controlling the Rendering of Sampled Audio 329

12 Described Auditory Content (Music) 331

12.1 A 'Quick Start' 331

12.2 Presenting/Rendering Described Auditory Content 333

12.3 Encapsulating Described Auditory Content 333

12.4 Operations on Described Audio 345

12.5 Design of a Described Auditory Content System 346

Index 361

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