Design Like You Give a Damn: Architectural Responses to Humanitarian Crises

( 3 )

Overview

The greatest humanitarian challenge we face today is that of providing shelter. The physical design of our homes, neighborhoods and communities shapes every aspect of our live, yet where architects are most desperately needed, they can least be afforded. Design Like You Give a Damn is a compendium of innovative projects from around the world that demonstrate the power of design to improve lives. It offers a history of the movement toward socially conscious design, and showcases more than 80 contemporary solutions...

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Overview

The greatest humanitarian challenge we face today is that of providing shelter. The physical design of our homes, neighborhoods and communities shapes every aspect of our live, yet where architects are most desperately needed, they can least be afforded. Design Like You Give a Damn is a compendium of innovative projects from around the world that demonstrate the power of design to improve lives. It offers a history of the movement toward socially conscious design, and showcases more than 80 contemporary solutions to such urgent needs as basic shelter, healthcare, education and access to clean water, energy and sanitation.

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Editorial Reviews

Alice Waters
This book brings forth the values of sustainability and diversity in a beautiful way-values which are as essential to our housing as they are to food we eat.
Chez Panisse Foundation
Bill McKibben
A book that is lovely in every sense of the word.. ...makes clear just how much talent is currently going to waste designing McMansions.
New York Review of Books
San Francisco Chronicle
Heavy on context and images, light on celebrity names, Design Like You Give a Damn is a bracing reminder that there's more to architecture than museums and posh private homes. Instead, the founders of the group Architecture for Humanity round up 77 nimble solutions to real-life problems: There are fiberglass domes for the homeless of Los Angeles, a schoolhouse in Burkina Faso with an arced steel roof that insulates the clay brick classrooms below -- even a water pump in South Africa that is powered by children playing on a merry-go-round. Truly inspirational.
Scotsman
Design Like You Give A Damn screams its message in its title. Good design is not a luxury, but a necessity.
Alex Steffen
If you care about the future we're building, you ought to own a copy of Design Like You Give a Damn!
World Changing
Treehugger
Design like you give a Damn is truly an important work-its lesson is that architecture and design are not about being on the cover of last week's New York Times Magazine but about making a difference in people's lives.
Leilani Labong
...a 336-page love letter to architects worldwide who provide pro-bono design services to communities that have survived war, government oppression and natural disasters. It's also an antidote to apathy. br>— 7X7 Magazine
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781933045252
  • Publisher: D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Pages: 350
  • Sales rank: 399,236
  • Product dimensions: 8.34 (w) x 8.04 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Architecture for Humanity was founded by its Executive Director, Cameron Sinclair, who has been a guest critic and lecturer at a number of schools and colleges in the United States. In the last year he has spoken at the Architectural League of New York, the Structures for Inclusion Conference, the 53rd International Design Conference in Aspen and at The Museum of Modern Art in New York. Awarded the first ever Nice Modernist award by Dwell magazine, Sinclair was also selected to be one of the 2004 Fast 50 by . He has been a guest speaker on NPR, CBC (Canada), BBC World Sevice and CNN International. In August 2004 Fortune magazine named him as one of the Aspen Seven—seven people changing the world for the better.

Kate Stohr brings a background in journalism and documentary production to Architecture for Humanity's grassroots efforts. Her work has been published in a number of national publications, including The New York Times, U.S. News & World Report, Dwell, and Architectural Record.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2006

    Hands-on Inspiration

    An uplifting compendium of projects and ideas to resolve problems resulting from extreme poverty and disaster situations and an antidote to the feeling that every day the headlines are more depressing. A very lively, colorful format which doesn't obscure the seriousness of the content. It is world-encompassing, ranging from re-habbed housing for battered women in the U.S. to providing water to African refugees. Some ideas are more practical than others but all inspire, they are simply the work of people who decided to give a damn and went to work.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2006

    An exceptional introspect

    This book is an invaluable resource to the architecture community. Both licensed professionals, interns, and students alike can read and learn about examples of thoughtful design from a non-traditional path. Anyone interested in thinking outside the box should read this book. Anyone pursuing a greater sense of design for people (emphasis here) should read and own this book as if it were their passion's guiding light.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2009

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