Design Meets Disability

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Overview

Eyeglasses have been transformed from medical necessity to fashion accessory. This revolution has come about through embracing the design culture of the fashion industry. Why shouldn't design sensibilities also be applied to hearing aids, prosthetic limbs, and communication aids? In return, disability can provoke radical new directions in mainstream design. Charles and Ray
Eames's iconic furniture was inspired by a molded plywood leg splint that they designed for injured and disabled servicemen. Designers today could be similarly inspired by disability. In Design Meets
Disability, Graham Pullin shows us how design and disability can inspire each other. In the Eameses'
work there was a healthy tension between cut-to-the-chase problem solving and more playful explorations. Pullin offers examples of how design can meet disability today. Why, he asks,
shouldn't hearing aids be as fashionable as eyewear? What new forms of braille signage might proliferate if designers kept both sighted and visually impaired people in mind? Can simple designs avoid the need for complicated accessibility features? Can such emerging design methods as
"experience prototyping" and "critical design" complement clinical trials?
Pullin also presents a series of interviews with leading designers about specific disability design projects, including stepstools for people with restricted growth, prosthetic legs (and whether they can be both honest and beautifully designed), and text-to-speech technology with tone of voice. When design meets disability, the diversity of complementary, even contradictory, approaches can enrich each field.

The MIT Press

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

" Design Meets Disability may be compared to Donald Norman's
(1988) Psychology of Everyday Things, which showed how research in cognitive psychology can inform commercial design. Similarly, Design Meets Disability
explains how commercial design principles can be used to make more personally identifiable and valuable assistive technologies. As important as Norman's book was to technology design,
Design Meets Disability could have a similar impact within the AT field." Jeff
Higginbotham Augmentative and Alternative Communication

The MIT Press

"The book... acts as a manifesto by condemning many of the existing products designed for people with disabilities, and challenging designers to use their skills to develop inspiring alternatives." Alice Rawsthorn New York Times

The MIT Press

"There is huge potential for innovation in the daily lives of disabled people. Graham
Pullin"s timely and inspiring book describes a wide range of design challenges; many of these sound niche at first -- but have broad potential. What are needed are off-the-wall thinking, design craft,
and engineering brilliance -- plus disabled people as expert co-designers." John Thackara
, designer and author of In the Bubble

The MIT Press

"This book will change your emotional response to designing for disability forever,
as you discover that designs can celebrate a medical necessity, as in elegant and fashionable eyewear from Cutler and Gross, or openly express functionality, as in the carbon fiber running legs sported by Aimee Mullins. Graham Pullin creates this change with chapters that are rich with examples and luscious images, combining deep thinking with a light touch. In the second half of the book he presents us with a fascinating collection of his favorite designers, leaving us yearning for the meetings between design and disability that such rich talent might generate, given the opportunity." Bill Moggridge , Cofounder of IDEO and author of Designing
Interactions

The MIT Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262516747
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 9/30/2011
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 742,515
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Graham Pullin is a lecturer in Interactive Media Design at the University of Dundee. He has worked as a senior designer at IDEO, one of the world's leading design consultancies, and at the
Bath Institute of Medical Engineering, a prominent rehabilitation engineering center in the United
Kingdom. He has received international design awards for design for disability and for mainstream products.
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