Design Of Pulse Oximeters / Edition 1

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Overview

Design of Pulse Oximeters describes the hardware and software needed to make a pulse oximeter, and includes the equations, methods, and software required for them to function effectively. The book begins with a brief description of how oxygen is delivered to the tissue, historical methods for measuring oxygenation, and the invention of the pulse oximeter in the early 1980s. Subsequent chapters explain oxygen saturation display and how to use an LED, provide a survey of light sensors, and review probes and cables. The book closes with an assessment of techniques that may be used to analyze pulse oximeter performance and a brief overview of pulse oximetry applications. The book contains useful worked examples, several worked equations, flow charts, and examples of algorithms used to calculate oxygen saturation. It also includes a glossary of terms, instructional objectives by chapter, and references to further reading.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Antal G. Hudetz, PhD, Dr. Med.Bi(Medical College of Wisconsin)
Description: This is an excellent treatment of the technical fundamentals and latest developments of pulse oximetry, a noninvasive technique used to continuously monitor arterial oxygen saturation of patients.
Purpose: During the last decade, pulse oximetry underwent tremendous growth in popularity and has evolved into a standard monitoring device in most surgical and critical care units worldwide. While there have been previous detailed treatments of the subject, recent advances in optoelectronic design and signal processing techniques as well as the continuing need for empirical instrument calibration have made an update on the subject very desirable.
Audience: The book is recommended to anyone who is interested in better understanding of how pulse oximetry truly works, the physiological conditions affecting accurate operation, and the potential sources of error. It could serve as a basic text for engineers interested in pulse oximeter design, for scientists who wish to apply oximetry in nonroutine purposes, and for physicians who simply wish to have an in-depth understanding of the technique.
Features: The book first introduces the reader to enough circulatory physiology to understand the theoretical bases and practical aspects of various techniques of oximetry. It then describes in detail considerations for the fabrication of pulse oximeters, including mechanical, optical, electronic, and signal processing aspects. The book discusses various strategies that have been used for instrument calibration and the physiological sources of potential inaccuracies. It includes some essential data that allow technical comparison of several instruments on the market and briefly describes a range of applications of the technique under both standard and extreme conditions, such as high speed flight.
Assessment: The book is superbly written and should be clearly understandable to a wide audience. Written by a world-ranking research team lead by Webster at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, the chapters are consistent throughout the book and each provides full coverage of the subject.
Antal G. Hudetz
This is an excellent treatment of the technical fundamentals and latest developments of pulse oximetry, a noninvasive technique used to continuously monitor arterial oxygen saturation of patients. During the last decade, pulse oximetry underwent tremendous growth in popularity and has evolved into a standard monitoring device in most surgical and critical care units worldwide. While there have been previous detailed treatments of the subject, recent advances in optoelectronic design and signal processing techniques as well as the continuing need for empirical instrument calibration have made an update on the subject very desirable. The book is recommended to anyone who is interested in better understanding of how pulse oximetry truly works, the physiological conditions affecting accurate operation, and the potential sources of error. It could serve as a basic text for engineers interested in pulse oximeter design, for scientists who wish to apply oximetry in nonroutine purposes, and for physicians who simply wish to have an in-depth understanding of the technique. The book first introduces the reader to enough circulatory physiology to understand the theoretical bases and practical aspects of various techniques of oximetry. It then describes in detail considerations for the fabrication of pulse oximeters, including mechanical, optical, electronic, and signal processing aspects. The book discusses various strategies that have been used for instrument calibration and the physiological sources of potential inaccuracies. It includes some essential data that allow technical comparison of several instruments on the market and briefly describes a range of applications of the technique underboth standard and extreme conditions, such as high speed flight. The book is superbly written and should be clearly understandable to a wide audience. Written by a world-ranking research team lead by Webster at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, the chapters are consistent throughout the book and each provides full coverage of the subject.
John Allen
... an excellent overview ... a must for biomedical engineers and medical physicists ... valuable contribution to clinical instrumentation and physiological measurement ... reasonably priced and ... worth buying.
— Freeman Hospital, IFMBE News
Valentin Grimblatov
... a complete guide to understanding, using, and designing the PO ... for biomedical engineers and for all those who need to know the technical workings of this instrument ... provides complete coverage of the field -from basic principles and techniques to signal-processing algorithms and calibration ... with an abundance of figures, tables and equations, the book is easy to read and clear in understanding ... particularly useful for graduate students, biomedical technicians as the essential reference .. the best book to date ... .
— Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, IEEE EMBS Magazine
Booknews
Webster (electrical and computer engineering, U. of Wisconsin- Madison) describes the equations, methods, hardware, and software needed to make a pulse oximeter, which provides early information on problems with the delivery of oxygen to tissue, is the standard of care in anesthesiology, and is used in diverse applications from intensive care units to veterinary surgery. Addressing biomedical engineers, medical physicists, and health care providers, he reviews how oxygen is delivered to tissue and the problems that can occur and the history of measuring oxygen, then delves into technical matters such as hemoglobin oxygen saturation display and light-emitting diode operation, reusable and disposable probes and cables, and assessing different techniques to evaluate performance. Includes a glossary without pronunciation. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

4 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Normal oxygen transport (S A Clark). Motivation of pulse oximetry (D J Sebald). Blood oxygen measurement (J Farmer). Light absorbance in pulse oximetry (O Wieben). Light-emitting diodes and their control (B W J Bourgeois). Photodetectors and amplifiers (J S Schowalter). Probes (M V S Reddy). Electronic instrument control (K S Paranjape). Signal processing algorithms (S Palreddy). Calibration (J S Schowalter). Accuracy and errors (S Tungjitkusolmun). User interface for a pulse oximeter (A Lozano-Nieto). Applications of pulse oximetry (J B Ruchala). Glossary. Index.

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