The Design of Things to Come: How Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products [NOOK Book]

Overview

The iPod is a harbinger of a revolution in product design: innovation that targets customer emotion, self-image, and fantasy, not just product function. Read the hidden stories behind BodyMedia's SenseWear body monitor, Herman Miller's Mirra Chair, Swiffer's mops, OXO's potato peelers, Adidas' intelligent shoes, the new Ford F-150 pickup truck, and many other winning innovations. Meet the innovators, learning how they inspire and motivate their people, as they shepherd their visions through corporate bureaucracy ...
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The Design of Things to Come: How Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products

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Overview

The iPod is a harbinger of a revolution in product design: innovation that targets customer emotion, self-image, and fantasy, not just product function. Read the hidden stories behind BodyMedia's SenseWear body monitor, Herman Miller's Mirra Chair, Swiffer's mops, OXO's potato peelers, Adidas' intelligent shoes, the new Ford F-150 pickup truck, and many other winning innovations. Meet the innovators, learning how they inspire and motivate their people, as they shepherd their visions through corporate bureaucracy to profitable reality.  The authors deconstruct the entire process of design innovation, showing how it really works, and how today's smartest companies are innovating more effectively than ever before.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132715935
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 7/12/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Craig M. Vogel is a professor in the School of Design and director of the Center for Design Research and Innovation in the college of Design Architecture, Art and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. He has developed an approach to design that integrates teaching and research. He has worked with a variety of companies as a consultant for new product development and strategic planning.

Jonathan Cagan, Ph.D., P.E., is a professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His research, teaching, and extensive consulting focus on product development, strategic planning, and design. He has developed team-based tools and computer-based technologies to improve the process of design conceptualization.

Peter Boatwright, Ph.D., is associate professor of marketing in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University. His expertise and teaching focus on new product marketing, consumer marketing, and marketing research methods. In his research, Professor Boatwright has developed new statistical methods, as well as additional theories of consumer behavior.

The authors have worked with a variety of companies, including, Procter & Gamble, International Truck and Engine, Respironics, Alcoa, Kennametal, New Balance, Kraft Foods, Motorola, Lubrizol, Ford, General Motors, Whirlpool, RedZone Robotics, DesignAdvance Systems, and Exxon Chemical.

Professors Cagan and Vogel are coauthors of the book Creating Breakthrough Products, which is a detailed approach to navigating the fuzzy front end of product development.


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Foreword.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

 1. The New Breed of Innovator.

 2. Pragmatic Innovation—The New Mandate.

 3. The Art and Science of Business.

 4. Identifying Today’s Trends for Tomorrow’s Innovations.

 5. Design for Desire—The New Product Prescription.

 6. The Powers of Stakeholders—People Fueling Innovation.

 7. B-to-B Innovation—The New Frontier of Fantasy.

 8. Making Decisions for Profit—Success Emerging from Chaos.

 9. A Process for Product Innovation.

10. Creating a Blanket of IP to Protect Your Brand from the Elements.

11. To Hire Consultants or Build Internally—That Is the Question.

Epilogue: The Powers of Innovation—The New Economy of Opportunity.

Index.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2006

    Practical Observations about Invention and Innovation

    We recommend this fascinating book to anyone directly engaged in innovation, working in a related field (from marketing to engineering) or curious about how new products come into being. Craig M. Vogel, Jonathan Cagan and Peter Boatwright share many case studies, which they generalize into rules for innovation. They offer useful, practical observations about current social changes. And, they do it all in lucid, personable prose their obvious affection for innovators gives the book warmth. However, despite their many examples, the authors don¿t - in the end - convince readers that the process they outline is really how innovation actually happens. They use author J. K. Rowling¿s successful Harry Potter books as a primary example of the role of fantasy in design - but they do not establish that her writing process resembles the pragmatic innovation methods they outline. Readers also may wish that they had answered one other question: why do some products that are not especially innovative do better in the marketplace than some that are truly new? This aside, the book¿s insider stories and advice are interesting, well focused and immediately applicable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2005

    innovation cannot be commoditised

    As an inventor, I found this book to be quite useful in broadening the scope of what inventors and would-be inventors should look at. The book makes the point that traditional inventing tends to focus on purely technological considerations. Often done by people with engineering or scientific backgrounds. But for a successful commercial product, the authors suggest SET - social, economic and technological. All these should be investigated and integrated into a final product. The motivation will be germane to many companies. Because now quality manufacturing is surely being performed by you and many of your competitors. In the last 20 years, such keynote ideas as Motorola's Six Sigma and Wal Mart's supply chain optimisations have percolated throughout the world. Quality is necessary but no longer sufficient. Unless you want to be the lowest cost producer in your industry. But by definition, there can only be one such in each industry. For others to survive, the book offers hope through embracing innovation. It points out that innovation cannot be commoditised. This may be your only enduring advantage. Plus, the book emphasises instituting a process of continual innovation. You have to expect that not all your resultant products will be hits. But by repetition, you can be like a casino house. Turn the iron hand of statistics to work in your favour.

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