Designing Borders

Designing Borders

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by Noel Kingsbury
     
 

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Seven renowned masters have created a brilliant handbook of stylish borders that anyone can copy at home. Such well-known names as Penelope Hobhouse, John Brookes, Piet Oudolf, Sandra and Nori Pope, and Robert Golby each contribute four completely original layouts-all with full planting plans, gorgeous photos, plant portraits, and three-dimensional realizations.

Overview

Seven renowned masters have created a brilliant handbook of stylish borders that anyone can copy at home. Such well-known names as Penelope Hobhouse, John Brookes, Piet Oudolf, Sandra and Nori Pope, and Robert Golby each contribute four completely original layouts-all with full planting plans, gorgeous photos, plant portraits, and three-dimensional realizations. The borders cover every situation, season, and taste: ranging from sunny Mediterranean, shady woodland and colorful summer to oriental, single color and easy care, they all have the stamp of their designer's individuality and personality. Gardeners looking for inspiration will find new perspectives here to devise a successful and attractive border.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
British garden designer Kingsbury (The New Perennial Garden) takes an innovative approach to addressing the problems faced by the average gardener. He has invited six other prominent designers, including Penelope Hobhouse and Piet Oudolf, to contribute plans for four borders for specific conditions in a medium-sized garden. While the plans are detailed enough to include the number of plants required, the focus is always on the creative reasoning behind the design. This combination of inspiration and practical advice, along with stunning color photographs, helps this book transcend both the typical how-to manual and the typical picture book of beautiful but impractical landscapes. The plants suggested for each border can be selected based on local needs and climate, making these plans eminently suitable for all American gardens. Kingsbury also provides a concise introduction to the history of borders and the practicalities of creating them, as well as a respectful and concise description of the designers' philosophies and careers. Recommended for all gardening collections.-Daniel Starr, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781844030101
Publisher:
Orion Publishing Group, Limited
Publication date:
05/01/2003
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
7.74(w) x 10.62(h) x 0.83(d)

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Designing Borders 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is a tropical-inspired border that uses salmon with purple. I had used purple elephant ear the previous summer with chartreuse accent and was wondering what I could do differently this year while maintaining the same tropical look. The salmon is just the right accent color and something I'd not have thought of on my own. In discussing one-color borders, he made this observation: '...red can be tricky...it is quite a dark colour en masse, creating a surprisingly sombre effect.' I always knew there was something that didn't 'sit right' with me with a solid red display but until I read that passage, I didn't know what it was. Yes, red alone is uninspired. Cold. This writer does not know or understand organic techniques. In fact, most of his garden maintenance suggestions are ineffective. An example is when he writes about protecting ligularia from slugs and recommends eggshells. Why not just use Es-car-Go! or Slug-Go--both are organic, inexpensive and easy. The effectiveness of eggshells is 'sometimesy.' In other areas he recommends the use of herbicides and even goes so far as to say that organic gardeners privately say they use them to get rid of weeds and then move into organic techniques. Well, I highly doubt this. Organic is practically a religion and this author has no grasp of organic techniques at all. Some of the editing leaves a bit to be desired. When he introduces the garden designers, for example, most of the descriptions are in the third person yet he includes himself and writes in the first person. Jarring. I would have opted to leave myself out of the garden designer list and put a note at the bottom about my contributions. It didn't read smoothly. In short, I'd say this book is valuable for the variety of ideas from garden designers. The gardening advice he dispenses is out of date and in some cases,dangerous. Cher