Designing Interfaces in Public Settings: Understanding the Role of the Spectator in Human-Computer Interaction

Overview

Interaction with computers is becoming an increasingly ubiquitous and public affair. With more and more interactive digital systems being deployed in places such as museums, city streets and performance venues, understanding how to design for them is becoming ever more pertinent. Crafting interactions for these public settings raises a host of new challenges for human-computer interaction, widening the focus of design from concern about an individual's dialogue with an interface to also consider the ways in which...

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Paperback (2011)
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Overview

Interaction with computers is becoming an increasingly ubiquitous and public affair. With more and more interactive digital systems being deployed in places such as museums, city streets and performance venues, understanding how to design for them is becoming ever more pertinent. Crafting interactions for these public settings raises a host of new challenges for human-computer interaction, widening the focus of design from concern about an individual's dialogue with an interface to also consider the ways in which interaction affects and is affected by spectators and bystanders.

Designing Interfaces in Public Settings takes a performative perspective on interaction, exploring a series of empirical studies of technology at work in public performance environments. From interactive storytelling to mobile devices on city streets, from digital telemetry systems on fairground rides to augmented reality installation interactive, the book documents the design issues emerging from the changing role of technology as it pushes out into our everyday lives.

Building a design framework from these studies and the growing body of literature examining public technologies, this book provides a new perspective for understanding human-computer interaction. Mapping out this new and challenging design space, Designing Interfaces in Public Settings offers both conceptual understandings and practical strategies for interaction design practitioners, artists working with technology, and computer scientists.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
From the reviews:
“Reeves’ book is a great outcome of his PhD, and is relevant to many scenarios and digital infrastructures that people deploy or are involved with every day. … Reeves recognizes that many bridges exist between humans and computers, and the resources that align perspectives from all of the stakeholders are paramount. … he presents a valid survey that is well worth looking at if you are interested in human-computer interaction (HCI). Do not overlook this book.” (Alyx Macfadyen, ACM Computing Reviews, October, 2011)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781447126225
  • Publisher: Springer London
  • Publication date: 2/24/2013
  • Series: Human-Computer Interaction Series
  • Edition description: 2011
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 196
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Stuart Reeves is a Research Fellow at Horizon Digital Economy Research, University of Nottingham. He is interested in the design of interactive technologies situated in public and semi-public settings, with particular focus on issues such as spectatorship. In his work he has been involved in developing, deploying and evaluating interaction in a variety of settings such as museums and galleries, crowded urban locations, and artistic or performance events taking place anywhere from city streets to dedicated venues.

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Table of Contents

Introduction.-Core Framework Concepts.-An Overview of Study Chapters.-From Individuals to Third Parties, from Private to Public.-Studying Technology in Public Settings.-Individuals to Third Parties.-Private to Public Settings.-Revisiting Opening Questions.-Studying Technology in Public Settings.-Concepts for Understanding Public Settings.-Practical Approaches to Studying Public Settings.-Relating Studies and Framework.-References.-Audience and Participants: One Rock.-Telescope Hardware and Software.-Telescope Design, Constraints and Aesthetics.-The Telescope in Use.-Discussion.-Professionals and Non-Professionals: The Journey into Space.-Other System Deployments.-Storytelling with the Torch Interface.-Discussion.-Summary.-References.-Orchestration and Staging: Fairground: Thrill Laboratory.-Running and Experiencing the Laboratory.-Discussion.-Summary.-References.-Frames and Bystanders: Uncle Roy All Around You.-Performing Uncle Roy.-Discussion.-Summary.-References.-A Framework for Designing Interfaces in Public Settings.-Performers and Spectators, Manipulation and Effects.-Revisiting Public and Private Interaction,-Frames, Audience, Bystanders and Wittingness.-Dynamism in Performance: Transitions.-Summary.-References.-Conclusion.-References.-Index

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