Desire: Women Write About Wanting

Desire: Women Write About Wanting

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by Lisa Solod Warren
     
 

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A captivating collection of essays, Desire delves headfirst into its subject matter and explores the complexity of desire with essays about the things women want, crave, lust after, and covet. An extraordinary group of writers tackle difficult and taboo subjects, from Debra Magpie Earling’s desire to hurt someone, to New York Times writer S. S.

Overview


A captivating collection of essays, Desire delves headfirst into its subject matter and explores the complexity of desire with essays about the things women want, crave, lust after, and covet. An extraordinary group of writers tackle difficult and taboo subjects, from Debra Magpie Earling’s desire to hurt someone, to New York Times writer S. S. Fair’s less than diminishing sensual and sexual desire, despite her increasing age, to Julia Serano’s strong emotional impulse to be a woman before she decided to transition from male to female.

Many of these essayists examine the feelings and experiences which surround the things they want but can’t—or shouldn’t—have. The reasons such desires are taboo are often personal and range from social conventions and religious teachings to more concrete laws and rules. Desire makes the private public and illuminates the rich and varied desires women have.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781580054096
Publisher:
Avalon Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/08/2011
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
280
File size:
437 KB

Meet the Author


Lisa Solod Warren has been an editor at Boston Magazine and Whittle Communications. She has written for the Boston Globe, the Boston Herald, Brain, Child, the Roanoke Times and World News. Solod has been awarded a dozen fellowships to the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. She has published essays in France, A Love Story and Matzo Balls for Breakfast. She lives in Virginia with her teenaged daughter.

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Desire: Women Write About Wanting 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having the distinct honor of knowing two of the writers featured in the first section, 'Of the Body,' I had to rush at the chance to write a review. My expectations were met far beyond what I could have ever imagined. The entire collection covers essays 'Of the Body,' 'Of the Soul,' and 'For the Real.' One essay in particular covers sexual taboos without being overtly X-rated, all within the mind of the sexy protagonist, who goes back and forth between her 'Regular Guy' and her fantasies. Reading the essay is like diving headfirst into a Disney film for adults, with enchanting colorful images and irresistible aromas. Connie Baechler unleashes the taboos many women are still too embarrassed to mention without the 'yes, buts' going through their heads. Another piece I thoroughly enjoyed was Rachel Kramer Bussel's deconstruction of female desire in 'Where Sluts Fear to Tread.' This hit immediately in the vein of what is slutty versus what is sexy, and Bussel does an amazing job trying to figure out her place in the melee. Lastly, not to be missed is Jane Juska's piece,'Younger than Winter,' on trying to retain sexiness as you get older. Very honest and very funny, I gobbled it right up. I truly cannot wait to finish the entire collection. Warren has done an excellent job in choosing essays that are erotic, funny and intelligent, making for a truly thought-provoking collection. After thumbing through the second and third section, I know I'll be more than satisfied.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Lisa Solod Warren has produced a vividly lush collection of writings with many talented contributors. At turns funny, poignant and philosophical, these biographical essays--Psyche's crystalline shards--make an extraordinary book. Desire reads as a beautiful mix of elegy and ode to the institutions of marriage and intimacy, among others, redolent with wisdom gleaned the hard way, and the beauty that brings. Warren has done a great service to the term Desire and has filled in the portrait of feminism with more richness. I will be revisiting these essays, in search of the exquisitely turned phrases and the wealth of contrasts, and the rare, forceful honesty, the complexity of mixed feelings in high contrast. I will be gifting this volume to many of the women in my life.