Destrangis

Destrangis

5.0 2
by Estopa
     
 

Like a punk-rock version of the Gipsy Kings, Spain's Estopa deliver flamenco passion with street attitude, fiery vocals, and the crunch of electric guitar. Brothers David and José Muñoz are already huge stars at home, and while their very Iberian sound -- and slang -- may find a harder road to fame abroad, Destrangis crackles with an energy that breaksSee more details below

Overview

Like a punk-rock version of the Gipsy Kings, Spain's Estopa deliver flamenco passion with street attitude, fiery vocals, and the crunch of electric guitar. Brothers David and José Muñoz are already huge stars at home, and while their very Iberian sound -- and slang -- may find a harder road to fame abroad, Destrangis crackles with an energy that breaks the language barrier. The direct lineage of their music is the '70s Gypsy rock of Los Chichos and Peret, but it's easy to discern the bouncing beats and surf guitars that flourish in Latin pop from Shakira to Ricky Martin. Capitalizing on the drama of flamenco palmas, machine-gun guitar strumming, and growling harmonies, Estopa give both genres a solid kick in the pants: "Vino Tinto" has the lean, propulsive swagger of your average Barcelona hardass, while "Ke Pasa!?" offers a Spanish answer to the fashionable Budweiser-inspired "Whaaaaassssssup!?" Following the surprise success of their eponymous debut, Destrangis benefits from splashier production and a more confident attack. While there are the fair share of ballads, the Muñoz brothers opt for more rumba and rock rhythms, with some special touches: "Partiendo la Pana" engages a boozy horn section and Perez Prado shouts before descending into Mexican-inspired madness. If your idea of a bar band encompasses red wine and olives, Estopa will be your new amigos.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Jason Birchmeier
Though less successful than the Spanish duo's 1999 eponymous album debut, Estopa's second album, Destrangis (2001), was nonetheless a huge hit for the Latin rock band from Cornellà, Spain, whose style draws from rhumba as well as flamenco traditions. Highlights of the 13-track album include the singles "Partiendo la Pana" and "Vino Tinto." A retitled edition of the album, Más Destrangis (2002), adds three new songs: a pair of live recordings, "El Yonki" and "Madre," and a studio recording, "Quieto Parao."

Product Details

Release Date:
04/09/2002
Label:
Sony U.S. Latin
UPC:
0743219243324
catalogNumber:
09651

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Estopa   Primary Artist
Francisco Amat   Electric Guitar,Keyboards,Coro,Loops,Coros
Xavi Turull   Percussion,Cajon,Pandereta
Luis Dulzaides   Percussion
Pedro Sánchez   Coro,spanish guitar,Coros
Sergio Castillo   Harmonica,Percussion,Piano,Electric Guitar,Bateria,Coros,Dirigida
Tito Dávila   Piano,Keyboards,Coro,Coros
Paco Bastante   Keyboards,Coro,Bajo Sexto,Coros
José Antonio Rodriguez Muñoz   Guitar,Coro,spanish guitar,Coros
Ludovico Vagnone   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Alfonso Perez   Piano
José Antonio Romero   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar,12-string Guitar,Mandoline
Juan Maya   Cajon,Coro,spanish guitar
Lulo Perez   Trumpet
Antonio Pallares   Trombone
Luis Miguel Baladrón   Coro,Coros
Marga Monge   Coro
Paco Hormigón   Electric Guitar,Coros
Goar Iñurrieta   Electric Guitar

Technical Credits

Francisco Amat   Programming,Engineer
Miguel DeLa Vega   Engineer
Ian Cooper   Mastering
Sergio Castillo   Programming
Maximo Raso   Graphic Design,Graphic Conception,Image Transmission
Héctor Sagrario   Engineer
David Salvador   Illustrations
Dani Altarriba   Engineer

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