Detroit Noir

Detroit Noir

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by E.J. Olsen, John C. Hocking, E. J. Olson
     
 

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From crime stories in the classic hard-boiled style to the vividly experimental, from the determination of those risking everything to the desperation of those with nothing left to lose, Detroit Noir delivers unforgettable tales that capture the city’s dark vitality.

Includes stories by: Joyce Carol Oates, Loren D. Estleman, Craig Holden, P.J.

Overview


From crime stories in the classic hard-boiled style to the vividly experimental, from the determination of those risking everything to the desperation of those with nothing left to lose, Detroit Noir delivers unforgettable tales that capture the city’s dark vitality.

Includes stories by: Joyce Carol Oates, Loren D. Estleman, Craig Holden, P.J. Parrish, Desiree Cooper, Nisi Shawl, M.L. Liebler, Craig Bernier, Joe Boland, Megan Abbott, Dorene O’Brien, Lolita Hernandez, Peter Markus, Roger K. Johnson, Michael Zadoorian, and E.J. Olsen.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

While the many fans of Akashic's consistently high-quality series might have expected the Motor City to be tapped sooner (maybe before the Twin Cities), they will find the delay well worth the wait. Few cities are as well suited to the genre as Detroit, with its embattled inner city and history of urban decline and blight, and the editors have assembled a talented lineup to do it justice with 16 original short stories. The always superb Loren D. Estleman starts the anthology off on a high note with his spare hard-boiled whodunit short, "Kill the Cat." The constantly simmering background threat of violence informs two very different but equally accomplished tales: Joyce Carol Oates's "Panic" and Detroit Free Presscolumnist Desiree Cooper's "Night Coming." The editors also include some well-done period pieces, like the 1950s-era "The Coffee Break" by Detroit Newsbusiness editor Melissa Preddy, and their discerning selections maintain Akashic's excellent track record. (Nov.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

Blues can evoke music, mood, and more, and the 21 stories in Chicago Bluesdisplay the work of some of Chicago's finest mystery writers. Most haunting are those that celebrate the blues as music, including Stuart Kaminsky's "Blue Note," in which a man plays high-stakes poker to prevent the maiming of his blues-singing mother. Longtime series protagonists are featured in tales from Sara Paretsky, Kris Nelscott, J.A. Konrath, and Max Allan Collins, while entries by Barbara D'Amato, David J. Walker, and Michael Allen Dymmoch star cops who may be crooked but are loyal to their own. Superior to Chicago Noir(Akashic, 2005), this should be of interest beyond the Second City area.

Motor City, Motown, Murder City: Detroit's varied faces are revealed in Detroit Noir's 16 stories by natives and/or city residents. A PI looking for a missing teen discovers-and solves-a multiple murder in Loren Estleman's "Kill the Cat." In "Pride" by P.J. Parrish (actually sisters Kris Montee and Kelly Nichols), a female police detective finds her own justice. A man driving his family behind a school bus in Joyce Carol Oates's "Panic" learns that potential violence can be life-changing as well. As these tales reveal, there is murder in even the best neighborhoods. But one of the most memorable entries-"Hey Love" by Detroit middle school teacher Roger K. Johnson-celebrates the Motown label.

Credit Cuban-born Obejas (Days of Awe) with Havana Noir; she edited and introduced it, translated 12 of the 18 stories, and wrote the longest one, about an American "pet foreigner" in Havana who threatens to interfere in a local family's affairs. The cumulative work of these writers(half living in Cuba, most of the others born there) describes a country of (mostly) have-nots, struggling with the rationing imposed after the revolution and doing what they must to survive, usually outside the law. Most poignant are "The Dinner" by Carolina Garcia-Aguilera, with its O. Henry-like twist, and "The Scene" by Mylene Fernandez Pintado, featuring a woman caring for her dying mother; most chilling are Mariela Varona Roque's stylish "The Orchid," about a child murderer, and Ena Lucia Portela's "The Last Passenger," describing an anonymous woman's relationship with a serial killer. Noir at its darkest.


—Michele Leber

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933354392
Publisher:
Akashic Books
Publication date:
11/01/2007
Series:
Akashic Noir Series
Pages:
300
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author


E.J. Olsen is a freelance writer and editor who grew up in the shadow of the Motor City. He reads everything, but his heart was stolen by noir fiction and film. John C. Hocking grew up outside Detroit in the '60s and '70s. He is an obsessive reader, writer, and collector of pulp and noir fiction.

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Detroit Noir 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You will like this book unfortunate taste
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After reading this noir for class, this book keeps getting better each time i read. Short stories each with their own unique style can be read in any order. Truely a great read.