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Developing an Evidence-Based Classification of Eating Disorders: Scientific Findings for DSM-5

Overview

The development, organization, and imminent release of DSM-5 have been the occasion of much research, analysis, synthesis, and publishing across the psychiatric classifications, including eating disorders. Over the last 5 years, eating disorder investigators from around the world have come together in a series of workshops and meetings to tackle complex and critical issues related to diagnosis, including the category of eating disorders not otherwise specified, the definition of binge eating, the latent structure...

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Overview

The development, organization, and imminent release of DSM-5 have been the occasion of much research, analysis, synthesis, and publishing across the psychiatric classifications, including eating disorders. Over the last 5 years, eating disorder investigators from around the world have come together in a series of workshops and meetings to tackle complex and critical issues related to diagnosis, including the category of eating disorders not otherwise specified, the definition of binge eating, the latent structure of eating disorder diagnoses, eating and feeding disorders in children, the impact of culture on eating disorder classification, and the diagnostic utility and validity of the binge eating disorder, purging disorder, and night eating syndrome.

Developing an Evidence-Based Classification of Eating Disorders: Scientific Findings for DSM-5 is the product of those discussions, which have had a profound impact on the ultimate recommendations for the DSM-5 eating disorders. Rigorous in its scholarship and fascinating in its findings, this book is an indispensible guide to the latest research in the field, as well as an informative preview of DSM-5.

American Psychiatric Publishing

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Brett C. Plyler, M.D.(Northwestern Memorial Hospital)
Description: This book, the result of a series of meetings held to present scientific data relevant to eating disorder classification, features summaries of the research presentations and the discussions that followed.
Purpose: The purpose is to be a guide to the latest research in the field of eating disorders and an inside look at the important issues being discussed for eating disorders in DSM 5.
Audience: It is written for any mental health practitioner interested in the research, development, and discussion of better classifications of eating disorders.
Features: The book covers a wide variety of topics related to eating disorder classification, with the upcoming publication of DSM 5 foremost in mind. A great deal of time is devoted to how to make the diagnostic categories more specific and accurate as most patients end up in the catch all of Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified. Different approaches are reviewed including empirical, mortality and recovery data, loss of control as a subfactor, binge size, and latent structure analysis. The next part focuses on eating disorders in children and adolescents with a series of proposed changes for DSM 5 and examination of the current taxonomy to determine its validity. The last section reviews cultural considerations, with chapters on Native American populations and on eating disorders in Japan, Canada, and the Pacific.
Assessment: This is a very important work in light of the imminent publication of DSM 5. A great deal of time and effort has gone into improving the diagnostic categories of eating disorders to make them more reliable and specific, and the book conveys that. The data are interesting and relative to anyone working with patients with eating disorders. However, the book is not for the casual reader. The chapters can be highly technical and dense. It is not, nor was it meant to be, a treatment guide for eating disorders. If you want to see how eating disorder nosology and taxonomy is created and the likely changes to DSM 5 and beyond, this is the book for you.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780890426661
  • Publisher: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/22/2011
  • Pages: 429
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Ruth H. Striegel-Moore, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology and Walter A. Crowell University Professor of the Social Sciences at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut.

Stephen A. Wonderlich, Ph.D., is Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor and Associate Chairman of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences; and Director of Clinical Research at the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, North Dakota.

B. Timothy Walsh, M.D., is Ruane Professor of Pediatric Psychopharmacology in Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University; and Director of the Division of Clinical Therapeutics at the New York State Psychiatric Institute in New York City.

James E. Mitchell, M.D., is Christoferson Professor and Chair of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience; Chester Fritz Distinguished University Professor at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences; and President and Scientific Director of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute in Fargo, North Dakota.

American Psychiatric Publishing

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Table of Contents

Foreword. Introduction. Part 1: Improving the Definition of Symptoms and Syndromes of Eating Disorders. Rethinking the nosology of eating disorders. Eating disorder not otherwise specified: theoretical and empirical advances since the publication of a meta-analysis covering 1987-2007. Current and future directions for the assessment of the cognitive criteria for anorexia nervosa. Characterization, significance, and predictive validity of binge size in binge eating disorder. Eating behavior in obese binge eating disoder, obese non-binge eating disorder, and non-obese control participants: a naturalistic study. Loss-of-control eating as a predictor of weight gain and the development of overweight, depressive symptoms, binge drinking, and substance use. Part 2: Empirical Approaches to Classification: Methodological Considerations and Research Findings. Empirical approaches to the classification of eating disorders. Latent structure analyses of eating disorder diagnoses: critical review of results and methodological issues. Empirical taxonomy of patients with eating disorders. Validating eating disorder classification models with mortality and recovery data. Latent structure of bulimic syndromes: an empirical approach utilizing latent profile analyses and taxometric analyses. Part 3: Eating and Feeding Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence. Classification of eating disturbance in children and adolescents: proposed changes for DSM-5. Validation of a diagnostic classification of feeding disorders in infants and young children. Eating disorders in children and adolescents: diagnostic differences and clinical challenges. Loss of control over eating in children and adolescents. Diagnostic classification of eating disorders in children and adolescents: how does DSM-IV-TR compare to empirically derived categories? Part 4: Cultural Considerations in the Classification of Eating Disorders. Culture and eating disorders classification. Eating disorders in Native American populations: a review of prevalence studies. Eating disorder symptoms of Native American and white adolescents. Should non-fat-phobic anorexia nervosa be included in the DSM-5? Eating disorders in Japan: cultural context, clinical features and future directions. Comparison of female Japanese and Canadian eating disorder patients on the Eating Disorder Inventory. A latent profile analysis of the typology of bulimic symptoms in an indigenous Pacific population: evidence of cross-cultural variation in phenomenology. Index.

American Psychiatric Publishing

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