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Developing Cross-Cultural Competence: A Guide for Working with Children and Their Families / Edition 4

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Overview

As the U.S. population grows more and more diverse, how can professionals who work with young children and families deliver the best services while honoring different customs, beliefs, and values? The answers are in the fourth edition of this bestselling textbook, fully revised to reflect nearly a decade of population changes and best practices in culturally competent service delivery. The gold-standard text on cross-cultural competence, this book has been widely adopted by college faculty and trusted as a reference by in-service practitioners for almost 20 years. For this timely NEW edition (see box), the highly regarded authors have carefully updated and expanded every chapter while retaining the basic approach and structure that made the previous editions so popular. Professionals will
• Get a primer on cultural competence. Readers will examine how their own cultural values and beliefs shape their professional practice, how the worldviews of diverse families may affect their perceptions of programs and services, and how providers can communicate more effectively with families from different cultural backgrounds.
• Deepen their understanding of cultural groups. Learn from in-depth chapters with nuanced, multifaceted explorations of nine different cultural backgrounds: Anglo-European, American Indian, African American, Latino, Asian, Filipino, Native Hawaiian and Samoan, Middle Eastern, and South Asian. Readers will get up-to-date insights on history, demographics, traditions, values, and family structure, and they'll examine the diverse ways each culture approaches child rearing, medical care, education, and disability.
• Discover better ways to serve families. Readers will get concrete recommendations for providing more effective, sensitive, and culturally competent services to children and families. They'll find practical guidance for every step in the service delivery process, from initiating contact with families to implementi

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Editorial Reviews

Karen E. Diamond

"An invaluable resource for students and practitioners . . . one that I would recommend to colleagues teaching both undergraduate and graduate courses in early childhood education and intervention."
Former Professor of Early Childhood Education, University of Missouri-Columbia; author and consultant - Linda M. Espinosa
"Updated examples help to clearly position this book in the complexities of the 21st century. This text should be required reading . . . we all need to deepen our understandings of the role of culture in our professional lives."
Assistant Professor, Special Education & Rehabilitation, Utah State University - Lillian K. Durán
"Avoids stereotyping, while at the same time providing a much needed window into common beliefs and perceptions that may be held by a diverse range of families. From intake through service delivery this volume will serve as invaluable guide to helping practitioners build strong and respectful relationships with the families and children they serve."
Midwest Book Review Education Shelf
"Any educator's collection strong in multicultural interactions will find this a winning guide pairing case stories with discussions of applied cultural competence."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781598571639
  • Publisher: Brookes, Paul H. Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 7/1/2011
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 568
  • Sales rank: 237,077
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Sam Chan, Ph.D., is Director of the Professional Services Center at the California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles.

Deborah Chen, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Special Education, California State University, Northridge (CSUN), teaches in the Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) programs. She also supervises ECSE credential candidates in early intervention and early childhood special education programs located in highly diverse communities in Los Angeles and surrounding counties. As an immigrant to the United States from Jamaica (West Indies) with Chinese roots, Dr. Chen has a personal and professional interest in working with families of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

Dr. Chen has extensive experience serving with families and their children with sensory impairments and multiple disabilities as an early interventionist, teacher, program administrator, teacher trainer, and researcher. She has directed projects of significance, model demonstration, outreach, research-to-practice, and personnel development projects funded by the U.S. Department of Education. These projects have focused on working with families and children of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, home-based early intervention, interdisciplinary training, caregiver-child interactions, and early communication and tactile communication strategies with children who are deaf-blind. Her publications reflect these professional efforts and interests.

Dr. Chen has disseminated her work at local, state, national, and international conferences. In addition, she has been invited to conduct professional development courses and to present at international conferences in Australia, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands, Qatar, Taiwan, and Thailand.

Marci J. Hanson, Ph.D., is Professor in the Department of Special Education at San Francisco State University (SFSU). At SFSU, Dr. Hanson is actively engaged in teaching, research, and service related to young children and their families. In addition to these responsibilities, she directs the SFSU joint doctoral program in special education with the University of California, Berkeley, and codirects the early childhood special education graduate program. She is a consultant with the child and adolescent development faculty of the Marian Wright Edelman Institute for the Study of Children, Youth, and Families at SFSU and with San Francisco Head Start.

Dr. Jackson is member of the faculty for the National Center for Cultural Competence at the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, where she provides technical assistance and consultation for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Children’s Mental Health Initiative. Throughout her 30-plus years as a clinical social worker, Dr. Jackson introduced Stress Management programming as an integral part of client and family services in various health and mental health settings.

For nearly 35 years, Dr. Lynch was involved in teaching, research, and community and family services that focused on improving the lives of young children who had, or were at risk for, disabilities. Prior to joining the faculty at San Diego State University (SDSU), Dr. Lynch received her doctorate in teaching exceptional children in 1972 from The Ohio State University and joined the faculty of Miami University. She subsequently joined the faculty of the University of Michigan, working in both academic and clinical positions.

Dr. Lynch became Professor Emerita at SDSU after chairing the Department of Special Education, directing the Early Childhood Special Education graduate program, and serving on the faculty of the SDSU–Claremont Graduate University joint doctoral program. Over the course of her career, Dr. Lynch directed a model demonstration project and personnel preparation grants in early intervention and early childhood special educat

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Table of Contents

About the Editors
About the Contributors
Preface
Acknowledgments
For the Reader

PART I INTRODUCTION

  1. Diversity in Service Settings
    Marci J. Hanson
  2. Conceptual Framework: From Culture Shock to Cultural Learning
    Eleanor W. Lynch
  3. Developing Cross-Cultural Competence
    Eleanor W. Lynch

PART II CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

  1. Families with Anglo-European Roots
    Marci J. Hanson
  2. Families with American Indian Roots
    Jennie R. Joe and Randi Suzanne Malach
  3. Families with African American Roots
    Tawara D. Goode, Wendy Jones, and Vivian Jackson
  4. Families with Latino Roots
    Maria E. Zuniga
  5. Families with Asian Roots
    Sam Chan and Deborah Chen
  6. Families with Filipino Roots
    Rosa Milagros Santos and Sam Chan
  7. Families with Native Hawaiian and Samoan Roots
    Noreen Mokuau and Pemerika Tauili'ili
  8. Families with Middle Eastern Roots
    Virginia-Shirin Sharifzadeh
  9. Families with South Asian Roots
    Namita Jacob

Postlude Children of Many Songs: Diversity within the Family
Eleanor W. Lynch and Marci J. Hanson

PART III SUMMARY AND IMPLICATIONS

  1. Steps in the Right Direction: Implications for Service Providers
    Eleanor W. Lynch and Marci J. Hanson

Suggested Readings and Resources

Author Index
Subject Index

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