The Developing Person Through the Life Span / Edition 7

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Overview

Kathleen Stassen Berger's The Developing Person Through the Life Span is a perennial bestseller instructors depend upon for an authoritative portrait of the field.  Enhanced with carefully crafted learning tools, its warm narrative style and emphasis on diverse lives and universal themes that speak directly to students.

With this new edition, that tradition is brought forward in a captivating new way.Cutting-edge research, electronic tools, and comprehensive insight combine to make The Developing Person Through the Life Span, Seventh Edition, the text that instructors need. With this edition, the ideal lifespan text is better than ever.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780716760726
  • Publisher: Worth Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/2/2007
  • Edition description: Seventh Edition
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 667
  • Sales rank: 392,222
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Kathleen Stassen Berger completed her undergraduate education at Stanford University and Radcliffe College, earned her M.A.T. from Harvard University and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Yeshiva University. Her broad range of experience as an educator includes directing a preschool, teaching philosophy and humanities at the United Nations International School, teaching child and adolescent development to graduate students at Fordham University, teaching inmates earning paralegal degrees at Sing Sing Prison, and teaching undergraduates at both Montclair State University and Quinnipiac University. She has also been involved in education as the president of Community School Board in District Two in Manhattan.

For over three decades, Berger has taught human development at Bronx Community College of the City University of New York. The students Kathleen Berger teaches every year come from diverse ethnic, economic, and educational backgrounds representing a wide range of interests and consistently honor her with the highest teaching evaluations.

Berger’s developmental texts are currently being used at nearly 700 colleges and universities in a dozen countries and in five languages. Kathleen’s research interests include adolescent identity, sibling relationships, and bullying. As the mother of four daughters, as well as a new grandmother, she brings to her teaching and writing ample firsthand experience with human development.

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Table of Contents

Part I: Beginnings
Chapter 1: Introduction
Defining Development
Science
Diversity
Connections between Change and Time
Dynamic Systems Theory
Five Characteristics of Development
Multidirectional
Multicontextual
Multicultural
Issues and Applications: “My Name Wasn’t Mary”
Multidisciplinary
Plasticity
A Case to Study: My Nephew David
Developmental Study as a Science
Steps of the Scientific Method
Ways to Test Hypotheses
Studying Change Over Time
Cautions from Science
Correlation and Causation
Quantity and Quality
Ethics
· New subsection “Defining Development” discusses the three crucial elements of the science of human development
· Increased focus on dynamic systems theory
· Issues and Applications: “My Name Wasn’t Mary,” about the childhood of poet Maya Angelou
· New coverage of mirror neurons
· New discussion of quantitative vs. qualitative research
· New discussion of protection of research participants.

Chapter 2: Theories of Development
What Theories Do
Grand Theories
Psychoanalytic Theory
Behaviorism
Thinking Like a Scientist: What’s a Mother For?
Cognitive Theory
Emergent Theories
Sociocultural Theory
Epigenetic Theory
In Person: My Beautiful, Hairless Babies
What Theories Contribute
The Nature–Nurture Controversy
No Answers Yet
· Expanded, updated coverage of epigenetic theory.
· Extensively revised discussion of selective adaptation with new examples.
· New subsection on nature–nurture interaction

Chapter 3: Heredity and Environment
The Genetic Code
What Genes Are
The Beginnings of Life
Issues and Applications: Too Many Boys?
From One Cell to Many
New Cells, New Functions
Gene-Gene Interactions
More Complications
Issues and Applications: Ethical Dilemmas of Assisted Reproduction
From Genotype to Phenotype
Addiction
Visual Acuity
Practical Applications
Chromosomal and Genetic Abnormalities
Not Exactly 46 Chromosomes
Genetic Counseling and Testing
Issues and Applications: Abort Everyone but a Dwarf?
·Expanded discussion of identical twins
· New coverage of cloning.
· New coverage of infertility and assisted reproductive technology, including In Person: “I Am Not Happy with Me,” about in vitro fertilization.
· New subsection “Visual Acuity,” on genetic and cultural factors in nearsightedness.
· New coverage of type 2 diabetes epidemic.

Chapter 4: Prenatal Development and Birth
From Zygote to Newborn
Germinal: The First 14 Days
Embryo: From the Third Through the Eighth Month
Fetus: From the Ninth Week Until Birth
Risk Reduction
Determining Risk
Protective Measures
Thinking Like a Scientist: Too Slow?
Benefits of Prenatal Care
A Case to Study: “What Do People Live to Do?”
A Case to Study: “What Does That Say About Me?”

The Birth Process
The Newborn’s First Minutes
Variations in Birth
Complications
Social Support
A Case to Study: “Throw Him in a Dumpster”
· Updated data on preterm births.
· New subsection “Protective Measures,” on reducing the risks of teratogens.
· New subsection “Benefits of Prenatal Care,” focusing on diagnostic testing.
· Expanded coverage of anoxia, with a new subsection.
· Expanded and updated coverage of low birthweight.
· New: A Case to Study: What Does That Say About Me?

Part II: The First Two Years
Chapter 5: The First Two Years: Biosocial Development
Body Changes
Body Size
Sleep
Brain Development
Connections in the Brain
Experience Enhances the Brain
Usual and Unexpected Experiences
Implications for Caregivers
Thinking Like a Scientist: Plasticity and Orphans
Senses and Motor Skills
Sensation and Perception
Hearing
Seeing
Tasting, Smelling, and Touching
Motor Skills
Ethnic Variations
In Person: The Normal Berger Babies
Public Health Measures
Immunization
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
Issues and Applications: Customs and Advice
Nutrition
·New coverage of co-sleeping
·New subsection “Implications for Caregivers,” covering self-righting, plasticity, and sensitive periods in brain development.
·Expanded coverage of infant reflexes, walking, immunization; and breast feeding.

Chapter 6: The First Two Years: Cognitive Development
Sensorimotor Intelligence
Stages One and Two: Primary Circular Reactions
Stages Three and Four: Secondary Circular Reactions
Thinking Like a Scientist: Object Permanence Revisited
Stages Five and Six: Tertiary Circular Reactions
Piaget and Research Methods
Information Processing
Affordances
Memory
Language: What Develops in the First Two Years?
The Universal Sequence
Theories of Language Learning
· New subsection on recent research on early affordances.
· New coverage of implicit and explicit memory.
· Updated coverage of the hybrid perspective of language development.

Chapter 7: The First Two Years: Psychosocial Development
A Case to Study: Parents on Autopilot
Emotional Development
Specific Emotions
Self-Awareness
Theories About Infant Psychosocial Development
Psychoanalytic Theory
BehaviorismCognitive Theory
Epigenetic Theory
Sociocultural Theory
A Case to Study: “Let’s Go to Grandma’s”
The Development of Social Bonds
Synchrony
Thinking Like a Scientist: The Still-Face Technique
Attachment
Social Referencing
Infant Day Care
Conclusions in Theory and Practice
· Updated and expanded coverage of temperament—and what it means for parents.
· Expanded coverage of sociocultural theory, with new material on ethnotheories (including A Case to Study: “Let’s Go to Grandma’s,” on difference between North American and Mayan parents’ ethnotheories) and on proximal and distal parenting practices.
· Expanded coverage of synchrony, including Thinking Like a Scientist: “The Still-Face Technique,” on infants’ responses to parental “still face.”
· Updated coverage of attachment.
· Updated and expanded coverage of infant day care.

Part III: The Play Years
Chapter 8: The Play Years: Biosocial Development
Body Changes
Growth Patterns
Eating Habits
Brain Development
Speed of Thought
Connecting the Brain’s Hemispheres
Planning and Analyzing
Emotions and the Brain
Motor Skills
Injuries and Abuse
Avoidable Injury
In Person: “My Baby Swallowed Poison”
Child Maltreatment
A Case to Study: A Series of Suspicious Events
· New coverage of overweight and .eating habits, including new subsection “Just Right” on young children’s rigid food preferences.
· New material on maturation of the prefrontal cortex.
· New section “Emotions and the Brain” on the limbic system and on the effects of stress.
· Updated and reorganized coverage of injuries and abuse, including In Person: “My Baby Swallowed Poison,” on strategies for injury prevention.

Chapter 9: The Play Years: Cognitive Development
Piaget and Vygotsky
Piaget: Preoperational Thinking
Vygotsky: Social Learning
Children’s Theories
Theory-Theory
Theory of Mind
Language
Vocabulary
In Person: Mommy the Brat
Grammar
Learning Two Languages
Early-Childhood Education
Developmental Programs
Teacher-Directed Programs
Intervention Programs
Costs and Benefits
· New subsection on theory-theory.
· Expanded and updated coverage of vocabulary development and bilingualism, including in new subsection “Constant Change.”
· Expanded coverage of preschools including Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and Head Start.

Chapter 10: The Play Years: Psychosocial Development
Emotional Development
Initiative Versus Guilt
Psychopathology
Empathy and Antipathy
Parents
Parenting Style
Issues and Applications: Planning Punishment
The Challenge of Media
Becoming Boys and Girls
Theories of Gender Differences
In Person: Berger and Freud
Gender and Destiny
· New subsection “Intrinsic Motivation.”
· Expanded discussions of empathy and aggression.
· New box on punishment.
· Expanded, updated coverage of media and its effects.

Part IV: The School Years
Chapter 11: The School Years: Biosocial Development
A Healthy Time
Size and Shape
Physical Activity
Chronic Illness
Brain Development
Advances in Brain Functioning
Measuring the Mind
Children with Special Needs
A Case to Study: Billy: Dynamo or Dynamite?
Developmental Psychopathology
Thinking Like a Scientist: Overdosing and Underdosing
Educating Children with Special Needs
· Revised, expanded, and updated discussion of overweight children.
· New section on physical activity, covering benefits and hazards, neighborhood play, exercise in school, and clubs and leagues.
· Expanded coverage of chronic illness and asthma.
· New subsection on gifted children and mentally retarded children.
· New box on on prescribing psychoactive drugs for children.
· New subsection on “Autistic Spectrum Disorders.”

Chapter 12: Cognitive Development: The School Years
Building on Theory
Piaget and School-Age Children
Vygotsky and School-Age Children
Information Processing
Language
Vocabulary and Pragmatics
Second-Language Learning
Issues and Applications: SES and Language Learning
Teaching and Learning
Curriculum
The Outcome
Thinking Like a Scientist: International Achievement Tests
Education Wars and Assumptions
A Case to Study: Where Did You Learn Tsunami?
Culture and Education
· Updated, expanded coverage of education, particularly bilingual education, curriculum, internationally and in the United States (including the No Child Left Behind Act), and math instruction in the United States, as well as new subsections on education in Japan and on education and culture.
· New boxes: Issues and Applications: SES and Language Learning; Thinking Like a Scientist: International Achievement Tests; and A Case to Study: When Did You Learn Tsunami?

Chapter 13: The School Years: Psychosocial Development
The Peer Group
The Culture of Children
Children’s Moral Codes
Social Acceptance
Bullies and Victims
Families and Children
Shared and Nonshared Environment
Thinking Like a Scientist: “I Always Dressed One in Blue Stuff”
Family Function and Dysfunction
Family Trouble
The Nature of the Child
Psychoanalytic Theory
Self-Concept
Coping and Overcoming
· Extensively revised and updated section on the peer group, with new focus on the culture of children, children’s moral codes, and social acceptance.
· New box “Thinking Like a Scientist: ’I Always Dressed One in Blue Stuff,’” on parental effects on children’s development.
· Expanded, updated material on effects of family income.

Part V: Adolescence
Chapter 14: Adolescence: Biosocial Development
Puberty Begins
Hormones
When Will Puberty Start?
Too Early, Too Late
Nutrition
The Transformations of Puberty
Growing Bigger and Stronger
Sexual Maturation
Brain Development
A Case to Study: What Were You Thinking?
Issues and Applications: Calculus at 8 a.m.?
Possible Problems
Sex Too Soon
Drug Use and Abuse
Learning from Experience
· New box: “A Case to Study: What Were You Thinking?”
· New section on brain development, focusing on recent neurological research, the relationship between brain and behavior, and puberty and biorhythms.
· New box “Issues and Applications: Calculus at 8 A.M.?”
· Updated discussions of teenage pregnancy and STIs.
· Reorganized, updated discussion of drug use and abuse.

Chapter 15: Adolescence: Cognitive Development
Adolescent Thinking
Egocentrism
In Person: Bethany and Jim
Formal Operational Thought
Intuitive, Emotional Thought
Better Thinking
Thinking Like a Scientist: Teenage Religion
Teaching and Learning
Technology and Cognition
Middle Schools
Transition and Translations
Teaching and Learning in High School
· New “Thinking Like a Scientist: Teenage Religion.”
· New section on the possibilities and problems related to adolescent use of the Internet and other new technologies.
· New major section on “Teaching and Learning,” with new sections on middle schools, the middle school to high school transition, and high school, including high-stake tests, dropouts, school violence, and new approaches.
· New box on “Issues and Applications: Diversity of Nation, Gender, and Income” (an international study of problem-solving abilities of adolescents).

Chapter 16: Adolescence: Psychosocial Development
Identity
Not Yet Achievement
Four Arenas of Identity Achievement
Relationships
Adults and Teenagers
Peer Support
In Person: The Berger Daughters Seek Peer Approval
Sexuality
Before Committed Partnership
Learning About Sex
Sexual Behavior
Sadness and Anger
Depression
Suicie
A Case to Study: “He Kept His Worries to Himself”
More Destructiveness
Thinking Like a Scientist: A Feminist Looks at the Data
· New section “Technology for Everyone” on technology and identity exploration
· New subsections on religious identity and vocational identity; updated and expanded material on sexual/gender identity and political/ethnic identity.
· Updated and expanded material on parent–adolescent relationships.
· New subsection “Cliques and Crowds” (including new In Person: The Berger Daughters Seek Peer Approval).
· New subsection “ on peer selection and peer facilitation.
· New major section “Sexual Activity.”
· Updated material on suicide and parasuicide, including “A Case to Study: “He Kept His Worries to Himself."
· Updated material on lawbreaking and delinquency, including “Thinking Like a Scientist: A Feminist Looks at the Data.”

Part VI: Emerging Adulthood
Chapter 17: Emerging Adulthood: Biosocial Development
Growth, Strength, and Health
Strong Bodies
Sexual Activity
Homeostasis
Organ Reserve
Issues and Applications: Who Should Get the Flu Shot?
Health Habits
Exercise
Eating Well
A Case to Study: “Too Thin, As If That’s Possible”
Taking Risks
Health Risks
Perspective
· New subsection “Looking Good” on concern with attractiveness.
· Expanded discussions of sexual activity and problems with sex, including new material on STIs and unwanted pregnancies.
· Issues and Applications: Who Gets the Flu Shot? on the question of which age group should be immunized first against bird flue.
· New major section “Health Habits” with sections on exercise and nutrition.
· New major section “Taking Risks” with new material on social protection, time perspective, and social norms.

Chapter 18: Emerging Adulthood: Cognitive Development
Postformal Thought
Fifth Stage or New Level?
Cognitive Flexibility
Thinking Like a Scientist: Reducing Stereotype Threat
Dialectical Thought
Morals and Religion
What Era? What Place?
Issues and Applications: Clear Guidelines for Cheaters
Measuring Moral Growth
Stages of Faith
In Person: Faith and Tolerance
Cognitive Growth and Higher Education
The Effects of College on Cognition
Changes in the College Context
Evaluating the Changes
· New material on cognitive flexibility.
· Revised and updated material on morals and religion.
· Revised and updated material on diversity among college students and on graduates and dropouts.

Chapter 19: Emerging Adulthood: Psychosocial Development
Intimacy
Friendship
The Development of Love
Marriage
In Person: Changing Expectations About Marriage
Domestic Violence
Family Connections
Emotional Development
Well-Being
Psychopathology
· Updated material on the dimensions of love.
· New section “Family Connections” on continuing family dependence.
· New section “Emotional Development,” including sections on well-being, psychopathology (substance abuse, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia), continuity and discontinuity.

Part VII: Adulthood
Chapter 20: Adulthood: Biosocial Development

The Aging Process
Senescence
Organ Reserve
The Sexual-Reproductive System
Fertility
Menopause
Health Habits
Drug Use
Eating
Preventive Medicine
Measuring Health
Mortality and Morbidity
Disability and Vitality
Thinking Like a Scientist: World Health and the Tragedy of the Commons
Variations
Ethnicity and Health
· Updated and revised discussion of the sexual-reproductive system.
· New material on nutrition and obesity.
· New section “Preventive Medicine.”
· New material on health and ethnicity.

Chapter 21: Adulthood: Cognitive Development
What Is Intelligence?
Research on Age and Intelligence
A Case to Study: “At Very Different Levels”
Components of Intelligence: Many and Varied
Age and Culture
Selective Gains and Losses
Optimization with Compensation
Expert Cognition
Expertise and Age
A Case to Study: Jenny: “Men Come and Go”
In Person: An Experienced Parent”

· New “A Case to Study: ‘At Very Different Levels,’” on individual variations over time.
· Revised and updated material on age and culture.
· New material on automatic expert cognition.
· New and updated material on coping wit stress, including “In Person: An Experienced Parent.”

Chapter 22: Adulthood: Psychosocial Development
A Case to Study: Linda: “Her Major Issues Were Relationships and Career”
Ages and Stages
The Social Clock
Personality Throughout Adulthood
Intimacy
Friends
Marriage
Divorce
In Person: Expectations
Family Bonds
In Person: Childhood Echoes
Generativity
Caregiving
Employment
A Case to Study: Linda: “A Much Sturdier Self”
· New section “Friends.”
· Revised and updated material on marriage., including new material on homogamy and marital equity, plus “In Person: Expectations.”
· New section “Caregiving,” including new, revised, and updated material on parenthood and on caring for aging parents.
· Extensively revised and updated section on employment

Part VIII: Late Adulthood
Chapter 23: Late Adulthood: Biosocial Development

Prejudice and Predictions
Ageism
Gerontology
From Pyramid to Square
Dependents and Independence
Senescence
Appearance
Dulling of the Senses
Issues and Applications: Getting from Place to Place
Major Body Systems
Compression of Morbidity
Theories of Aging
Wear-and-Tear
Genetic Aging
Cellular Aging
Thinking Like a Scientist: Prolonging Life
The Centenarians
Other Places, Other Stories
The Truth About Life After 100
· New box “Issues and Applications: Getting from Place to Place,” on importance of mobility.
· Updated and revised section on genetic aging, including discussions of average and maximum life expectancy and selective adaptation.
· New box, on theories of aging and attempts to prolong life.

Chapter 24: Late Adulthood: Cognitive Development
The Usual: Information-Processing after Age 65
Sensing and Perceiving
A Case to Study: “That Aide Was Very Rude”
Memory
Thinking Like a Scientist: John, Paul, Ringo, and....
Control Processes
Thinking Like a Scientist: Neuroscience and Brain Activity
Secondary Aging
Ageism
The Impaired: Dementia
Alzheimer’s Disease
Many Strokes
Subcortical Dementias
Reversible Dementia
A Case to Study: Overmedication and Drug Abuse
The Optimal: New Cognitive Development
Aesthetic Sense and Creativity
The Life Review
Wisdom
· New “A Case to Study: ’That Aide Was Very Rude,’” on sensory declines.
· Revised and updated section on control processes.
· Revised and updated section on secondary aging.
· New “A Case to Study” on problems of overmedication and drug abuse.
· New section on prevention and treatment of dementia.

Chapter 25: Late Adulthood: Psychosocial Development
Theories of Late Adulthood
Self Theories
Issues and Applications: Improving Personality
Stratification Theories
A Case to Study: Doing Just Fine
Dynamic Theories
Work and Leisure
Retirement
Continuing Education
Volunteer Work
Religious Involvement
Political Activism
Friends and Relatives
Long-Term Marriages
The Frail Elderly
Issues and Applications: Buffers Between Fragile and Frail
Caring for the Frail Elderly
Aging in Place
Elder Abuse
Nursing Homes
A Case to Study: Great-Grandmother Was Wearing Out
· New “Issues and Applications: Improving Personality.”
· New section on recent work and retirement trends and issues.

Epilogue
Death and Hope
How Death has Changed in the Past Century
Death Throughout the Life Span
Many Religions, Many Cultures
Dying and Acceptance
Attending to the Needs of the Dying
A Case to Study: “Ask My Son and My Husband”
Choices and Controversies
Bereavement
Normal Grief
In Person: Blaming Martin, Hitler and Me

Complicated Grief
Diversity of Reactions
· Greatly expanded, revised, and reorganized throughout.
· New main section “Death and Hope,” with new material on death throughout the life span, death and religion, acceptance of dying, and choosing death (including “Issues and Applications: Let Terri … Live/Die/Live/Die,” on the Terri Schiavo case).
· New subsection “Seeking Blame and Meaning, including “In Person: Blaming Martin, Hitler and Me,” on a husband’s death.
· Revised and expanded material on diversity of reactions to bereavement.

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