Developing SVG-based Web Applications

( 1 )

Overview

  • Smoothly manage resizable, interactive, visual Web content with SVG—Scalable Vector Graphics
  • Learn SVG programming quickly and effectively, using classroom-proven techniques
  • Extend your XML and Web development skills with this exciting, dynamic new technology

The perfect introduction to serious SVG programming.

Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is a powerful, XML-based ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $14.79   
  • New (1) from $215.00   
  • Used (6) from $14.79   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$215.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

  • Smoothly manage resizable, interactive, visual Web content with SVG—Scalable Vector Graphics
  • Learn SVG programming quickly and effectively, using classroom-proven techniques
  • Extend your XML and Web development skills with this exciting, dynamic new technology

The perfect introduction to serious SVG programming.

Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is a powerful, XML-based language for describing two-dimensional graphics. Web developers will find many compelling features in SVG, including low-bandwidth images that scale without loss of resolution; customizable, dynamic, data-driven content; animation; interactivity via languages such as JavaScript, Java, and Visual Basic; and more. As a text-based format, SVG files can be understood by humans, edited with text editors, and even indexed online by search engines.

The major Web browsers promise native SVG support in the near future, so now's the time to catch up with this emerging technology. Developing SVG-based Web Applications, by Web development authority Ellen Pearlman and graphic artist/Web designer Lorien House, teaches you to produce top-notch content without losing you in extraneous details. Coverage includes the effective use of color, gradients, and other effects, and how to tie it all together with CSS. You'll also learn how to add dynamic elements to your site, including animation and interactivity, as well as how to use SVG effectively with drawing, database, and other software. Complete with plenty of practical, classroom-tested examples to work through, you'll find Developing SVG-based Web Applications both approachable and informative.

You'll learnto:

  • Design attractive, professional-grade Web sites using SVG
  • Employ dynamic images and data-driven content for truly impressive presentations
  • Harness a new Web standard that promises dynamic levels of interactivity
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131004993
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 12/15/2002
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 6.02 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 1.14 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Ch. 1 Introduction to SVG 1
Ch. 2 Getting Started 29
Ch. 3 Basic Shapes and Text 87
Ch. 4 Paths 127
Ch. 5 Color, Gradients, and Patterns 145
Ch. 6 Filter Effects 175
Ch. 7 Clipping and Masking 223
Ch. 8 Styles and Cascading Style Sheets 241
Ch. 9 Animation and Interactivity 257
Ch. 10 SVG and Drawing Packages 297
Ch. 11 SVG and Other Packages 323
Ch. 12 Advanced XML Discussions 339
App. A: Elements List 361
App. B: Attributes List 365
App. C SVG Resources 405
Index 409
Read More Show Less

Introduction

Preface

SVG, although a revelation for graphic artists and designers who use the Web, is actually the result of the ongoing development of XML (Extensible Markup Language). To designers and users alike, it has become increasingly clear that bitmapped graphics are too large and occupy too much bandwidth—one of a host of disadvantages. Another is the inability to break open the actual graphics code and get in there and edit it. With SVG you now can.

HTML created a new era for the Internet, starting with the very first browser, Mosaic. XML, along with SVG and a host of other XML-derived standards and codes, will enable the idea of multiple devices and their displays to become a reality. The SVG-enabled Adobe Viewer and other viewers will be integrated on the back end of the releases of most major browsers in the future and will become the defacto standard in developing visual displays because of their streamlining abilities.

Learning SVG is not as easy as HTML but its potential is just as great. Learning the basic rules and then using your own brand of creativity with them is what this book is about. However, it is best to begin to look at any SVG design project in three ways: as a graphic designer, an animator, and a little bit as a programmer. The good news is this is not new for most Web-enabled designers who are already capable of programming in Macromedia's Flash ActionScript.

This book, therefore, is written for those with some basic programming ability, although it is not absolutely necessary to have those skills to use this book. But once you become familiar with the basics, the learning curve will accelerate and you will be on your way to creatingyour own interesting and dynamic Web sites.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2003

    As Easy As Learning HTML

    Scalable Vector Graphics is a cool concept that is open source, resolution independent and uses XML to encode its instructions. You know perhaps how Postscript is resolution independent? One major reason for its becoming the defacto standard for printing hardcopy images. Trouble is, Adobe owns it. Well, after HTML came along, people wondered if there was a way to take the inspiration of Postscript, and apply it in a different context - Web pages. SVG is one such implementation. Given the inherent visual nature of SVG, and the tag constructs, it looks like HTML and should be as earn to learn. The title of the book gives the prerequisite: Are you already a Web developer? At a minimum, you know HTML. You do not need to have XML prior to this. In point of fact, suppose you do NOT know XML? You can treat this book as a means of learning XML, with SVG just as a useful example topic. XML deals mostly with data representation, and not usually display. In this way, it is more of an abtraction than HTML. With the latter, when you tweak an HTML page, you get immediate visual feedback. This in no small part helped HTML become successful. But with a typical XML book, you have to work a little harder to decipher your efforts. The neat thing about using this book is that XML becomes as easy as learning HTML!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)