Development Through Life: A Psychosocial Approach / Edition 11

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Overview

This book uses a chronological approach to present development across the life span, drawing on the psychosocial theory of Erik Erikson to provide a conceptual framework. The authors address physical, intellectual, social, and emotional growth in all life stages, focusing on the idea that development results from the interdependence of these areas at every stage, and placing special emphasis on optimal development through life.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781111344665
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 2/18/2011
  • Series: PSY 232 Developmental Psychology Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 11
  • Pages: 768
  • Sales rank: 128,666
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Barbara M. Newman (Ph.D., University of Michigan) is a professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Rhode Island. She has also been on the faculty at Russell Sage College and The Ohio State University, where she served as department chair in Human Development and Family Science and as associate provost for Faculty Recruitment and Development. She teaches courses in life-span development, adolescence, family theories, and the research process. Also an active researcher, Dr. Newman's interests focus on parent-child relationships in early adolescence, factors that promote success in the transition to high school, and the use of the cohort sequential design as an approach to the study of development. Her research includes an analysis of the role of family, peer, and school support in the transition to high school (funded by the University of Rhode Island's Research Foundation). For fun, Newman enjoys reading, making up projects with her grandchildren, taking walks along Narragansett Bay and Block Island Sound, and spending time with her family.

Philip R. Newman (Ph.D., University of Michigan) is involved in research on the transition to high school as well as on group identity and alienation. His projects include an analysis of issues related to disrupted transitions in adolescence and early adulthood, and a book about how high schools can meet the psychosocial needs of adolescents. He has taught courses in introductory psychology, adolescence, social psychology, developmental psychology, counseling, and family, school, and community contexts for development. He served as the director for Research and Evaluation of the Young Scholars Program at The Ohio State University and as the director of the Human Behavior Curriculum Project for the American Psychological Association. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI), and the American Orthopsychiatric Association. For fun, Newman enjoys photography, reading mysteries, attending concerts and Broadway plays, and watching baseball. He home schooled his three children through elementary and middle school. Together, the Newmans have worked on programs to bring low-income minority youths to college and to study the processes involved in their academic success. They are coauthors of 13 books, including a book on theories of human development, and numerous articles in the field of human development.

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Table of Contents

1. The Development Through Life Perspective. 2. Major Theories for Understanding Human Development. 3. Psychosocial Theory. 4. The Period of Pregnancy and Prenatal Development. 5. lnfancy (First 24 Months). 6. Toddlerhood (Ages 2-3). 7. Early School Age (4-6 Years). 8. Middle Childhood (6-11 Years). 9. Early Adolescence (12-18 Years). 10. Later Adolescence (18-24 Years). 11. Early Adulthood (24-34 Years). 12. Middle Adulthood (34-60 Years). 13. Later Adulthood (60-75 Years). 14. Elderhood (75 Until Death). 15. Understanding Death, Dying, and Bereavement. Appendix. The Research Process.

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