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The Devil's Teardrop

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Overview

After an early morning machinegun attack by a madman called the Digger leaves dozens dead in the Washington, D.C., subway, the mayor’s office receives a message demanding twenty million dollars by midnight or more innocents will die. It is New Year’s Eve, and with the ransom note as the only evidence, Special Agent Margaret Lukas calls upon retired FBI agent and the nation’s premier document examiner Parker Kincaid to join the manhunt for the Digger—or for hundreds, the first moments of the new year will be their...

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The Devil's Teardrop: A Novel of the Last Night of the Century

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Overview

After an early morning machinegun attack by a madman called the Digger leaves dozens dead in the Washington, D.C., subway, the mayor’s office receives a message demanding twenty million dollars by midnight or more innocents will die. It is New Year’s Eve, and with the ransom note as the only evidence, Special Agent Margaret Lukas calls upon retired FBI agent and the nation’s premier document examiner Parker Kincaid to join the manhunt for the Digger—or for hundreds, the first moments of the new year will be their last on earth.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The New York Times Dazzling.

The New York Times Book Review A screaming hit.

Publishers Weekly Outstanding, gripping, brilliant, spectacular.

People Deaver is the master of ticking-bomb suspense.

Los Angeles Times A thrill ride between covers.

The Times (London) The best psychological thriller writer around.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439195116
  • Publisher: Pocket Star
  • Publication date: 12/28/2010
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 386,321
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeffery  Deaver

Jeffery Deaver is the international, #1 bestselling author of more than twenty-seven suspense novels, including The Bone Collector, which was made into a film starring Denzel Washington. He lives in North Carolina.

Biography

Born just outside Chicago in 1950 to an advertising copywriter father and stay-at-home mom, Jeffery Deaver was a writer from the start, penning his first book (a brief tome just two chapters in length) at age 11. He went on to edit his high school literary magazine and serve on the staff of the school newspaper, chasing the dream of becoming a crack reporter.

Upon earning his B.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri, Deaver realized that he lacked the necessary background to become a legal correspondent for the high-profile publications he aspired to, such as The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal, so he enrolled at Fordham Law School. Being a legal eagle soon grew on Deaver, and rather than continue on as a reporter, he took a job as a corporate lawyer at a top Wall Street firm. Deaver's detour from the writing life wasn't to last, however; ironically, it was his substantial commute to the law office that touched off his third -- and current -- career. He'd fill the long hours on the train scribbling his own renditions of the kind of fiction he enjoyed reading most: suspense.

Voodoo, a supernatural thriller, and Always a Thief, an art-theft caper, were Deaver's first published novels. Produced by the now-defunct Paperjacks paperback original house, the books are no longer in print, but they remain hot items on the collector circuit. His first major outing was the Rune series, which followed the adventures of an aspiring female filmmaker in the power trilogy Manhattan Is My Beat (1988), Death of a Blue Movie Star (1990), and Hard News (1991).

Deaver's next series, this one featuring the adventures of ace movie location scout John Pellam, featured the thrillers Shallow Graves (1992), Bloody River Blues (1993), and Hell's Kitchen (2001). Written under the pen name William Jefferies, the series stands out in Deaver's body of work, primarily because it touched off his talent for focusing more on his vivid characters than on their perilous situations.

In fact, it is his series featuring the intrepid and beloved team of Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs that showcases Deaver at the top of his game. Confronting enormous odds (and always under somewhat gruesome circumstances), the embittered detective and his feisty partner and love interest made their debut in 1991's grisly caper The Bone Collector, and hooked fans for four more books: The Coffin Dancer (1998), The Empty Chair (2000), The Stone Monkey (2002), and The Vanishing Man(2003). Of the series, Kirkus Reviews observed, "Deaver marries forensic work that would do Patricia Cornwell proud to turbocharged plots that put Benzedrine to shame."

On the creation of Rhyme, who happens to be a paraplegic, Deaver explained to Shots magazine, "I wanted to create a Sherlock Holmes-ian kind of character that uses his mind rather than his body. He solves crimes by thinking about the crimes, rather than someone who can shoot straight, run faster, or walk into the bar and trick people into giving away the clues."

As for his reputation for conjuring up some of the most unsavory scenes in pop crime fiction, Deaver admits on his web site, "In general, I think, less is more, and that if a reader stops reading because a book is too icky then I've failed in my obligation to the readers."

Good To Know

Deaver revises his manuscripts "at least 20 or 30 times" before his publishers get to even see a version.

Two of his books have been made into major feature films. The first was A Maiden's Grave (the film adaptation was called Dead Silence), which starred James Garner and Marlee Matlin. The Bone Collector came next, starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie.

In addition to being a bestselling novelist, Deaver has also been a folksinger, songwriter, music researcher, and professional poet.

Deaver's younger sister, Julie Reece Deaver, is a fellow author who writes novels for young adults.

In our interview with Deaver, he reveals, "My inspiration for writing is the reader. I want to give readers whatever will excite and please them. It's absolutely vital in this business for authors to know their audience and to write with them in mind."

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    1. Also Known As:
      William Jefferies, Jeffery Wilds Deaver
    2. Hometown:
      Washington, D.C.
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 6, 1950
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chicago, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of Missouri; Juris Doctor, cum laude, Fordham University School of Law
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One: The Last Day of the Year

A thorough analysis of an anonymous letter may greatly reduce the number of possible writers and may at once dismiss certain suspected writers. The use of a semicolon or the correct use of an apostrophe may eliminate a whole group of writers.

-Osborn and Osborn,

Questioned Document Problems

The Digger's in town.

The Digger looks like you, the Digger looks like me. He walks down the wintry streets the way anybody would, shoulders drawn together against the damp December air.

He's not tall and not short, he's not heavy and not thin. His fingers in dark gloves might be pudgy but they might not. His feet seem large but maybe that's just the size of his shoes.

If you glanced at his eyes you wouldn't notice the shape or the color but only that they don't seem quite human, and if the Digger glanced at you while you were looking at him, his eyes might be the very last thing you ever saw.

He wears a long, black coat, or a dark blue one, and not a soul on the street notices him pass by though there are many witnesses here — the streets of Washington, D.C., are crowded because it's morning rush hour.

The Digger's in town and it's New Year's Eve.

Carrying a Fresh Fields shopping bag, the Digger dodges around couples and singles and families and keeps on walking. Ahead, he sees the Metro station. He was told to be there at exactly 9 A.M. and he will be. The Digger is never late.

The bag in his maybe-pudgy hand is heavy. It weighs eleven pounds though by the time the Digger returns to his motel room it will weigh considerably less.

A man bumps into him and smiles and says, "Sorry," but the Digger doesn't glance at him. The Digger never looks at anybody and doesn't want anybody to look at him.

"Don't let anybody..." Click. "...let anybody see your face. Look away. Remember?"

I remember.

Click.

Look at the lights, he thinks, look at the...click...at the New Year's Eve decorations. Fat babies in banners, Old Man Time.

Funny decorations. Funny lights. Funny how nice they are.

This is Dupont Circle, home of money, home of art, home of the young and the chic. The Digger knows this but he knows it only because the man who tells him things told him about Dupont Circle.

He arrives at the mouth of the subway tunnel. The morning is overcast and, being winter, there is a dimness over the city.

The Digger thinks of his wife on days like this. Pamela didn't like the dark and the cold so she...click...she...What did she do? That's right. She planted red flowers and yellow flowers.

He looks at the subway and he thinks of a picture he saw once. He and Pamela were at a museum. They saw an old drawing on the wall.

And Pamela said, "Scary. Let's go."

It was a picture of the entrance to hell.

The Metro tunnel disappears sixty feet underground, passengers rising, passengers descending. It looks just like that drawing.

The entrance to hell.

Here are young women with hair cut short and briefcases. Here are young men with their sports bags and cell phones.

And here is the Digger with his shopping bag.

Maybe he's fat, maybe he's thin. Looking like you, looking like me. Nobody ever notices the Digger and that's one of the reasons he's so very good at what he does.

"You're the best," said the man who tells him things last year. You're the...click, click...the best.

At 8:59 the Digger walks to the top of the down escalator, which is filled with people disappearing into the pit.

He reaches into the bag and curls his finger around the comfy grip of the gun, which may be an Uzi or a Mac-10 or an Intertech but definitely weighs eleven pounds and is loaded with a hundred-round clip of .22 long-rifle bullets.

The Digger's hungry for soup but he ignores the sensation.

Because he's the...click...the best.

He looks toward but not at the crowd, waiting their turn to step onto the down escalator, which will take them to hell. He doesn't look at the couples or the men with telephones or women with hair from Supercuts, which is where Pamela went. He doesn't look at the families. He clutches the shopping bag to his chest, the way anybody would if it were full of holiday treats. One hand on the grip of whatever kind of gun it is, his other hand curled — outside the bag — around what somebody might think is a loaf of Fresh Fields bread that would go very nicely with soup but is in fact a heavy sound suppressor, packed with mineral cotton and rubber baffles.

His watch beeps.

Nine A.M.

He pulls the trigger.

There is a hissing sound as the stream of bullets begins working its way down the passengers on the escalator and they pitch forward under the fire. The hush hush hush of the gun is suddenly obscured by the screams.

"Oh God look out Jesus Jesus what's happening I'm hurt I'm falling." And things like that.

Hush hush hush.

And all the terrible clangs of the misses — the bullets striking the metal and the tile. That sound is very loud. The sounds of the hits are much softer.

Everyone looks around, not knowing what's going on.

The Digger looks around too. Everyone frowns. He frowns.

Nobody thinks that they are being shot. They believe that someone has fallen and started a chain reaction of people tumbling down the escalator. Clangs and snaps as phones and briefcases and sports bags fall from the hands of the victims.

The hundred rounds are gone in seconds.

No one notices the Digger as he looks around, like everyone else.

Frowning.

"Call an ambulance the police the police my God this girl needs help she needs help somebody he's dead oh Jesus my Lord her leg look at her leg my baby my baby..."

The Digger lowers the shopping bag, which has one small hole in the bottom where the bullets left. The bag holds all the hot, brass shells.

"Shut it off shut off the escalator oh Jesus look somebody stop it stop the escalator they're being crushed..."

Things like that.

The Digger looks. Because everybody's looking.

pard

But it's hard to see into hell. Below is just a mass of bodies piling up, growing higher, writhing...Some are alive, some dead, some struggling to get out from underneath the crush that's piling up at the base of the escalator.

The Digger is easing backward into the crowd. And then he's gone.

He's very good at disappearing. "When you leave you should act like a chameleon," said the man who tells him things. "Do you know what that is?"

"A lizard."

"Right."

"That changes color. I saw it on TV."

The Digger is moving along the sidewalks, filled with people. Running this way and that way. Funny.

Funny...

Nobody notices the Digger.

Who looks like you and looks like me and looks like the woodwork. Whose face is white as a morning sky. Or dark as the entrance to hell.

As he walks — slowly, slowly — he thinks about his motel. Where he'll reload his gun and repack his silencer with bristly mineral cotton and sit in his comfy chair with a bottle of water and a bowl of soup beside him. He'll sit and relax until this afternoon and then — if the man who tells him things doesn't leave a message to tell him not to — he'll put on his long black or blue coat once more and go outside.

And do this all over again.

It's New Year's Eve. And the Digger's in town.

While ambulances were speeding to Dupont Circle and rescue workers were digging through the ghastly mine of bodies in the Metro station, Gilbert Havel walked toward City Hall, two miles away.

At the corner of Fourth and D, beside a sleeping maple tree, Havel paused and opened the envelope he carried and read the note one last time.

Mayor Kennedy —

The end is night. The Digger is loose and their is no way to stop him. He will kill again — at four, 8 and Midnight if you don't pay.

I am wanting $20 million dollars in cash, which you will put into a bag and leave it two miles south of Rt 66 on the West Side of the Beltway. In the middle of the Field. Pay to me the Money by 1200 hours. Only I am knowing how to stop The Digger. If you apprehend me, he will keep killing. If you kill me, he will keep killing.

If you dont think I'm real, some of the Diggers bullets were painted black. Only I know that.

This was, Havel decided, about as perfect an idea as anybody could've come up with. Months of planning. Every possible response by the police and FBI anticipated. A chess game.

Buoyed by that thought, he replaced the note in the envelope, closed but didn't seal it and continued along the street. Havel walked in a stooped lope, eyes down, a pose meant to diminish his six-two height. It was hard for him, though; he preferred to walk tall and stare people down.

The security at City Hall, One Judiciary Square, was ridiculous. No one noticed as he walked past the entrance to the nondescript stone building and paused at a newspaper vending machine. He slipped the envelope under the stand and turned slowly, walking toward E Street.

Warm for New Year's Eve, Havel was thinking. The air smelled like fall — rotten leaves and humid wood smoke. The scent aroused a pang of undefined nostalgia for his childhood home. He stopped at a pay phone on the corner, dropped in some coins and dialed a number.

A voice answered, "City Hall. Security."

Havel held a tape recorder next to the phone and pressed PLAY. A computer-generated voice said, "Envelope in front of the building. Under the Post vending machine. Read it now. It's about the Metro killings." He hung up and crossed the street, dropping the tape recorder into a paper cup and throwing the cup into a wastebasket.

Havel stepped into a coffee shop and sat down in a window booth, where he had a good view of the vending machine and the side entrance to City Hall. He wanted to make sure the envelope was picked up — it was, before Havel even had his jacket off. He also wanted to see who'd be coming to advise the mayor. And whether reporters showed up.

The waitress stopped by his booth and he ordered coffee and, though it was still breakfast time, a steak sandwich, the most expensive thing on the menu. Why not? He was about to become a very wealthy man.

Copyright © 1999 by Jeffery Deaver

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 33 )
Rating Distribution

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(19)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2003

    Last Night of the Century

    From the first word to the last, Jeffery Deaver ignites the reader not to put the book down. Set in New York on New Year¿s Eve on December 31, 1999. The Devil¿s Teardrop is not just a novel. This story helps the reader understand and realize that a lot more goes on than just the big picture we see. The Devil¿s Teardrop has many conflicts .One including Man vs. Man. This conflict is between the special agent and ¿The Digger¿ who is the antagonist in this story. ¿The Digger¿ is a crazed man who threatens the entire city of New York that he will bomb a specific location every four hours until midnight unless he gets paid everything he wants. New York City never knew about the terrorist threats. So everyone kept partying. They are all partying because the theme of this story happens to be on New Year¿s Eve. This story is told from the mind of a special agent that got put on this case because he is the best at what he does. Mr. Jeffery Deaver is the best at creating twisters in his stories. For example at the end of the book when the terrorist was on his way to pick up the ransom he was holding the city¿s safety to and was in a car crash and instantly killed. This to me was not expected under any circumstances. He made the characters so realistic that at one time during this book, I found myself jumping to every sound I heard around me thinking it was a bomb going off. I would have to say that this book had one of the best endings I had ever read. The suspense level was off the charts in every chapter. I recommend everyone to read this book, and to go through this roller coaster book so you can realize and understand that there is always something other then the ¿big picture¿ that some people get caught up in. It wont be a disappointment. This page-turner reeled me in from the first paragraph.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2002

    SUPERB READ!!!!!!!!

    This is one you could never put down. This book does not stop till the last word.This is, by far, the BEST book that I have ever read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2000

    BEST THRILLER OF THE YEAR!

    After reading The Bone Collector I knew I had to read The Devil's Teardrop. From the robot-like killer to the devious plan put in motion by 'the man who tells him things', this book will tie you up with its intricate plot, characters that you really care about, and a narative drive that doesn't let up till the final page. Set aside some time for this one. It's well worth the roller coaster ride. This will go on your shelf as one of your favorites, but keep it handy--You may want to read it again.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2013

    Great read

    This thriller was a little different than his others and I found it refreshing. Still lots of twists and unexpected turns, keeps you on your toes and I especially liked the title,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2012

    Excellent mystery

    excellent mystery, many twists and turns, fascinating tech details about document examination field; only minor down-side: author has an annoying writing habit of using WAY too many contractions, beyond normal writing and speech patterns, esp. double contractions

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  • Posted April 17, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A good story.

    The Devil's Teardrop was a good story. It had decent character development, but was slow in parts. Overall, I enjoyed it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2003

    The Digger is buried by Jeffery Deaver

    Jeffery Deaver is a master at suspense and complicated plots. One must read the book very carefully to pick out all the clues. It should be read in one setting, if possible to keep the flow of the action in his writings. Suspensful to the end and it will leave you, at the end, wanting more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2002

    You tricked me again, Mr. Deaver!

    Although, not my favorite so far, still a very good read. Alittle far-fetched with the time frame but hey, I've never worked for DCPD or the FBI so I don't know how accurate the pace of action is. This time I actually tried to figure out what twist Deaver had in store for me this time. I came real close but he still had another trick up his sleeve, I couldn't predict. This is why it's so important to read a Deaver book from cover to cover, because he'll always sneak up on you at the end!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2002

    Wonderful Twist In the Plot

    THE DEVIL¿S TEARDROP AUTHOR: JEFFERY DEAVER PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster REVIEWED BY: Barbara Rhoades BOOK REVIEW: Once again, Jeffery Deaver writes a great book with an unexpected twist for an ending. It is the Christmas Season and Parker Kincaid only wants to celebrate in peace with his son and daughter. But his ex-wife plans to contest custody of their children and the City of Washington, D.C. is going to need his forensic expertise. As the country¿s top forensic document examiner, Parker will be pulled from retirement against his will to assist in capturing the Digger before he kills again. Unfortunately, the Digger¿s accomplice is killed in an accident before he can pick up the ransom money he demanded to stop the Digger¿s killing. Working with Special Agent Margaret Lukas, with a secret of her own, Parker studies the documents available and begins the task of finding the killer. Deaver writes with great detail regarding the forensic tasks and has the intriguing twists in the plot for which he is known. It is a book that is hard to put down until you know the ending.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2001

    GREAT suspense book !

    This book left me on the edge of my seat for the entire duration of time while reading it! It kept me in a state of mind trying to solve the 'puzzles' as the book went along. Kept getting better and better with every turn of the page! Its a MUST!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2000

    Thrilling, Nail biting thriller

    You need a glass of water just to read this book, as the dialog makes your throat dry

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2000

    Clever Storyline

    The first Deaver book I've read, and I'll be sure to read more. A little ridiculous at some points and took too much literary license at times, but a very captivating and twisting plot. He also stuck in some good human elements, which help accept the book as being potentially realistic. You're not wasting any time with this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2000

    What A Book

    I enjoyed this book so much. I just started to read again and this was my second book. I could not put the book down. Deaver kept me in suspense from beginning to end. And at the same time he educated me on the world of the FBI. Great work.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2000

    A great read

    Deaver kept you biting your nails throughout the entire book. Fast paced, suspenseful, and well written. Strong, interesting characters and a super plot.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2000

    Fascinating right from the start !

    This novel has no slow chapters to be found . Right from the start , the author creates a fascinating and compelling story. Makes the reader want to stay up all night to read on ----- if that were possible. Realistic characters and thrilling plot twists too. Something for everyone . :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2000

    gripping pageturner

    fascinting, gripping. the story grabs you and won't let you put the book down. suspensful and with the touch of heart-warming. great characters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2000

    One of the top ten of the year

    This is one of the best books of the year. I always learn fascinating information when I read Deaver's books and he keeps me on the edge of my seat. It's definitly the best E-book edition I have downloaded this year.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 1999

    Great Exciting Book!

    A great page turner...makes you want to stay home and watch TV on New Year's Eve with the doors locked!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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