Diagnostic Issues in Depression and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Refining the Research Agenda for DSM-V

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $102.41
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (2) from $102.41   
  • New (2) from $102.41   

Overview

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depression (MD) form the largest group of common mental disorders. These two conditions often occur together, and emerging evidence suggests several similarities between them. As we move toward revising the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders for DSM-V, Diagnostic Issues in Depression and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Refining the Research Agenda for DSM-V explores the nosologic relationship between GAD and MD. In this comprehensive manual, more than 45 contributors cover a wide range of empirical and conceptual issues that face clinicians and researchers working with GAD and MD today.

This book acts as a guidepost for the entire DSM process. It reviews recent scientific advances in our understanding of the interrelationship between GAD and MD, summarizes the body of evidence into a few broad conclusions, and reflects on the implications of these findings for future nosologic efforts. The contributing authors review empirical data from a variety of perspectives — including genetics, biology, treatment, development, course, predictors, disability, and psychosocial stressors — and then integrate results from research on all these diverse validators to come up with a single "bottom-line" recommendation regarding the relationship between GAD and MD. In addition, the book considers conceptual issues, such as criteria for results from validators, the relevance of results on symptoms of anxiety and depression, weights of different classes of validators, and the rules for assigning disorders into categories. And finally, it addresses the question of what new kinds of data could be gathered that would help to clarify the relationship between MD and GAD more definitively. Each chapter includes tables, charts, and references to enhance the evidence presented on such diverse topics as: • A thorough review of the genetics of GAD and MD• The role of psychotropics in distinguishing between GAD and MD• Biological and treatment aspects of GAD and MD• Psychometric aspects of GAD and MD• Childhood risk factors associated with GAD and MD• Common mental disorders across cultures

Diagnostic Issues in Depression and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Refining the Research Agenda for DSM-V develops operationalized criteria for nosologic decisions that enable clinicians to bridge the gap between data to diagnostic recommendations. Not only does the methodology of investigating an active interchange between empirical and conceptual perspectives shed new light on the relationship between GAD and MD, but it also carries implications for the rest of DSM-V.

American Psychiatric Publishing

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody Reviews
Reviewer: Aaron Plattner, MD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: Over 45 authors examine the nosological relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by covering a wide spectrum of issues facing both clinicians and researchers working in these areas.
Purpose: As the DSM-V is being prepared, this book helps readers understand the in-depth process of setting criteria by examining the interrelationship between GAD and MDD, centering on the question of whether the two should be combined for DSM-V. By examining this question, readers gain insight into how research data is translated into diagnostic recommendations.
Audience: Clinicians who interact with patients with MDD or GAD or researchers who work in this field would benefit from this book. Actually, anyone would find this book fascinating, if only on a purely academic level.
Features: The authors review empirical data from several perspectives, including nosological history, genetic and biological findings, treatment options and responses, course, psychometric aspects, predictors including childhood risk factors, cultural implications, and psychosocial stressors, with the overall goal of arriving at a final conclusion about the relationship between GAD and MDD. They discuss conceptual issues to illustrate the impact of nosological decisions such as different criteria for differing but related illnesses, the relevance of data results for symptoms of anxiety and depression, and the rules for assigning disorders to categories. They provide some insight into the future research that would help to clarify the relationship between these two disorders. Each chapter includes tables and charts with appropriate references and many chapters are followed by a commentary.
Assessment: My exposure to various diagnostic issues has come from lectures and small sections in various textbooks, but I have not been exposed to the depth of the complicated and thorough process of making nosological decisions, despite the fact that my practice is heavily influenced by the DSM criteria. I found this book to be both fascinating and educational, giving me a greater understanding of the process of developing DSM criteria from research and the ramifications of the decisions, even though I am unsure of the specific ways in which this book will directly influence my treatment strategies for the patients I see. Still, I recommend this book to providers and researchers who work with the DSM so that they can better understand the process of defining criteria for the upcoming DSM-V.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Aaron Plattner, MD (Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services)
Description: Over 45 authors examine the nosological relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by covering a wide spectrum of issues facing both clinicians and researchers working in these areas.
Purpose: As the DSM-V is being prepared, this book helps readers understand the in-depth process of setting criteria by examining the interrelationship between GAD and MDD, centering on the question of whether the two should be combined for DSM-V. By examining this question, readers gain insight into how research data is translated into diagnostic recommendations.
Audience: Clinicians who interact with patients with MDD or GAD or researchers who work in this field would benefit from this book. Actually, anyone would find this book fascinating, if only on a purely academic level.
Features: The authors review empirical data from several perspectives, including nosological history, genetic and biological findings, treatment options and responses, course, psychometric aspects, predictors including childhood risk factors, cultural implications, and psychosocial stressors, with the overall goal of arriving at a final conclusion about the relationship between GAD and MDD. They discuss conceptual issues to illustrate the impact of nosological decisions such as different criteria for differing but related illnesses, the relevance of data results for symptoms of anxiety and depression, and the rules for assigning disorders to categories. They provide some insight into the future research that would help to clarify the relationship between these two disorders. Each chapter includes tables and charts with appropriate references and many chapters are followed by a commentary.
Assessment: My exposure to various diagnostic issues has come from lectures and small sections in various textbooks, but I have not been exposed to the depth of the complicated and thorough process of making nosological decisions, despite the fact that my practice is heavily influenced by the DSM criteria. I found this book to be both fascinating and educational, giving me a greater understanding of the process of developing DSM criteria from research and the ramifications of the decisions, even though I am unsure of the specific ways in which this book will directly influence my treatment strategies for the patients I see. Still, I recommend this book to providers and researchers who work with the DSM so that they can better understand the process of defining criteria for the upcoming DSM-V.
PsycCRITIQUES
The volume is well written and scholarly, and it includes excellent empirical summaries on the topic of mood and anxiety comorbidity. Chapters are replete with recent empirical findings and secondary summaries of recently published articles; thus, the volume reads as a collection of "cutting-edge" journal articles and, in this way, is quite unique.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780890424568
  • Publisher: American Psychiatric Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/22/2010
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

David Goldberg, D.M., F.R.C.P., is Professor Emeritus at the Institute of Psychiatry, Health Service and Population Research, at King's College in London, England.

Kenneth S. Kendler, M.D., is Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Human Genetics at the Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics in the School of Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia.

Paul J. Sirovatka, M.S. (1947—2007), was Director of Research Policy Analysis in the Division of Research and American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education at the American Psychiatric Association in Arlington, Virginia.

Darrel A. Regier, M.D., M.P.H., is Executive Director of the American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education and Director of the Division of Research at the American Psychiatric Association in Arlington, Virginia.

American Psychiatric Publishing

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contributors ix

Preface Darrel A. Regier xvii

1 The Problem: Charge to the Conference Kenneth S. Kendler 1

2 The Nosologic Relationship between Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depression John M. Hettema 15

Commentary on “The Nosologic Relationship Between Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depression” Jules Angst Alex Gamma Vladeta Ajdacic Wulf Rössler 41

3 The Biology of Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder: Commonalities and Distinguishing Features Elizabeth I. Martin Charles B. Nemeroff 45

4 What (No) Differences in Responses to Three Classes of Psychotropics Can Teach us About Distinctions Between Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder Toshi A. Furukawa Norio Watanabe Ichiro M. Omori 71

Commentary On “The Biology of Gad and MDD” and “What (No) Differences in Responses to Three Classes of Psychotropics Can Teach Us About Distinctions Between Gad and MDD” David J. Kupfer Ellen Frank 105

5 Psychometric Aspects of Anxiety and Depression David Goldberg 109

Commentary On “Psychometric Aspects of Anxiety and Depression” Patrick E. Shrout 125

6 The Boundary Between Generalized Anxiety Disorder and the Unipolar Mood Disorders: Diagnostic and Psychometric Findings in Clinical Samples Timothy A. Brown 131

7 Major Depression and Generalized Anxiety Disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey Follow-Up Survey Ronald C. Kessler Michael Gruber John M. Hettema Irving Hwang Nancy Sampson Kimberly A. Yonkers 139

8 The Relationship of Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depression Over Time Valery N. Krasnov 171

9 Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depression: Common and Reciprocal Causes D.M. Fergusson L. J. Horwood 179

10 Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Common Mental Disorders Across Cultures K.S. Jacob Martin Prince David Goldberg 191

Commentary On “Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Common Mental Disorders Across Cultures” Dan J. Stein Vikram Patel Gerhard Heinze 211

11 Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Depression: Childhood Risk Factors in a Birth Cohort Followed to Age 32 Years Terrie E. Moffitt Avshalom Caspi HonaLee Harrington Barry Milne Maria Melchior David Goldberg Richie Poulton 217

12 Are There Early Adverse Exposures that Differentiate Depression and Anxiety Risk? Marcus Richards David Goldberg 241

13 Episodes and Disorders of General Anxiety and Depression Ian M. Goodyer 257

14 Are Major Depression and Generalized Anxiety Disorder the Same or Different Disorders? Discussion of the Dunedin and Medical Research Council Birth Cohort Studies and the Three-Generation High Risk Study Myrna M. Weissman Virginia Warner Priya Wickramaratne 271

15 Toward a Primary-Care Friendly DSM-V Classification of Emotional Disorders: An Integrative Approach J. Ormel M. J. Manley 285

16 Psychosocial Origins of Depressive and Anxiety Disorders George W. Brown 303

Commentary On “Psychosocial Origins of Depressive and Anxiety Disorders,” Part 1 Sidney Zisook 333

Commentary On “Psychosocial Origins of Depressive and Anxiety Disorders,” Part 2 Donna E. Stewart 347

17 The Relationship between Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depressive Episode David Goldberg 355

Index 363

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)