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Dialogues Of The Early Church

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
SMYRNA.—Part I. Pteboessa. Neopistus. Syageids. Pteroessa. Hail, 0 Syagrius ! and thou, too, 0 Neopistus! Gods and men will rejoice tomorrow ! Syagrius. 'Tis too far off, 0 Pteroessa; I mean to rejoice to-night. I come from the ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
SMYRNA.—Part I. Pteboessa. Neopistus. Syageids. Pteroessa. Hail, 0 Syagrius ! and thou, too, 0 Neopistus! Gods and men will rejoice tomorrow ! Syagrius. 'Tis too far off, 0 Pteroessa; I mean to rejoice to-night. I come from the bath, where a chorus of Rhodian chanters have charmed away the afternoon. There is a party for wine in the gardens of Euxestus; there are some dancers from beyond the Indus, who will weave a purple shawl as they dance. To-morrow!—what's tomorrow ? Neopistus. A worse copy of to-day—more bald and wrinkled, with more paint, and wine, and perfumes. Pier. 0 austere sophist! knowest thou not the new proconsul—a richer man than has held the province these many years—will move all the city by his entrance to-morrow ? 0ur slaves must be directed to awake us early that we may have achoice of seats in the theatre, or at least a possibility of sitting. Syag. 0 vain woman ! let life be easy; thou mayest never awake to-morrow, it may please the gods. Thy poor slave would sleep never the worse; let him sleep it out, one hour is as long as another : so be happy to-night—to-morrow, if thou hast it. Pter. I may as well do as thou sayest, for I shall not sleep a watch of the night, through wishing for the dawn. "What! I would rather miss the high festival of the Phrygian mother, the feast of goats' flesh, and the dance iu their skins to cymbals, than not carry my breakfast with me to the spectacle to-morrow. Doth our Socrates frown on this ? Neop. Nay, 0 Pteroessa ! I know not which of the two I would rather miss. Syag. A. philosopher, art thou not ?—one, that is, who lives neither for to-morrow nor to-day. Thy breed flourishes in Athens still—the wise men there laugh at the people, and watch their heads turn this way and that, as men on the shore ...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781104065829
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 2/6/2009
  • Pages: 204
  • Product dimensions: 0.63 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

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SMYRNA.Part I. Pteboessa. Neopistus. Syageids. Pteroessa. Hail, 0 Syagrius ! and thou, too, 0 Neopistus! Gods and men will rejoice tomorrow ! Syagrius. 'Tis too far off, 0 Pteroessa; I mean to rejoice to-night. I come from the bath, where a chorus of Rhodian chanters have charmed away the afternoon. There is a party for wine in the gardens of Euxestus; there are some dancers from beyond the Indus, who will weave a purple shawl as they dance. To-morrow!what's tomorrow ? Neopistus. A worse copy of to-daymore bald and wrinkled, with more paint, and wine, and perfumes. Pier. 0 austere sophist! knowest thou not the new proconsula richer man than has held the province these many yearswill move all the city by his entrance to-morrow ? 0ur slaves must be directed to awake us early that we may have achoice of seats in the theatre, or at least a possibility of sitting. Syag. 0 vain woman ! let life be easy; thou mayest never awake to-morrow, it may please the gods. Thy poor slave would sleep never the worse; let him sleep it out, one hour is as long as another : so be happy to-nightto-morrow, if thou hast it. Pter. I may as well do as thou sayest, for I shall not sleep a watch of the night, through wishing for the dawn. "What! I would rather miss the high festival of the Phrygian mother, the feast of goats' flesh, and the dance iu their skins to cymbals, than not carry my breakfast with me to the spectacle to-morrow. Doth our Socrates frown on this ? Neop. Nay, 0 Pteroessa ! I know not which of the two I would rather miss. Syag. A. philosopher, art thou not ?one, that is, who lives neither for to-morrow nor to-day. Thy breed flourishes in Athens stillthe wise men there laugh at thepeople, and watch their heads turn this way and that, as men on the shore ...
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