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Diana's Boys: William and Harry and the Mother They Loved

Overview

Five years after Diana's death, Prince William and his brother Prince Harry -- "the heir and the spare," as Fleet Street dubbed them -- are the planet's two most photographed, written-about, and speculated-about young men. People everywhere feel an intense affection for Wills and Harry, and wonder if, without their mother to guide them, they are withering or flourishing in the House of Windsor.

In this much anticipated sequel to his New York Times #1 bestseller The Day Diana ...

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2002 Hardcover Large Print Edition Good with no dust jacket 158724151x. Ex-Library; 1.33 x 9.31 x 6.32 Inches; 415 pages.

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2002 Hardcover Good in good dust jacket. Ex Library book with usual stamps and stickers. Good Clean Condition Book. Good condition is defined as: a copy that has been read but ... remains in clean condition. All of the pages are intact and the cover is intact and the spine may show signs of wear. The book may have minor markings which are not specifically mentioned. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

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Overview

Five years after Diana's death, Prince William and his brother Prince Harry -- "the heir and the spare," as Fleet Street dubbed them -- are the planet's two most photographed, written-about, and speculated-about young men. People everywhere feel an intense affection for Wills and Harry, and wonder if, without their mother to guide them, they are withering or flourishing in the House of Windsor.

In this much anticipated sequel to his New York Times #1 bestseller The Day Diana Died, Christopher Andersen draws on important sources -- many of whom have agreed to speak here for the first time -- to paint this sympathetic, yet often startling portrait of William and Harry, and reveal how their mother remains a constant presence in their lives.

Here is a story of a mother who died too young, and the beloved sons who are her living legacy.

Just as Andersen's bestsellers Jack and Jackie, Jackie After Jack, and The Day John Died allowed us to once again experience Camelot, readers will relive the tender relationship between Diana and her spirited offspring. This is the story of a mother who died too young and the children who are her living legacy.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
"My boys mean everything to me. They're my life." So said the late Diana, Princess of Wales, about her sons, William and Harry. Christopher Andersen, author of The Day Diana Died, has drawn on many key sources to take an insightful look at the very special relationship between a mother and her sons. Andersen reveals new details about how the boys learned of and have tried to cope with the death of their mother, how their parents' often tempestuous marriage has affected them, how the queen attempted to mold them in "the Windsor image," and Camilla Parker-Bowles's growing influence in their lives.
Library Journal
Not just the title but the subject of this book is a closely guarded secret; Anderson (The Day Diana Died) is famed for digging the dirt on controversial figures, and this would appear to be no exception. We're promised a revelation before pub date. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587241512
  • Publisher: Cengage Gale
  • Publication date: 1/28/2002
  • Series: Wheeler Large Print Book Series
  • Edition description: Large Print
  • Pages: 415
  • Product dimensions: 6.32 (w) x 9.31 (h) x 1.33 (d)

Meet the Author

Christopher Andersen is the critically acclaimed author of twenty-one books that have been translated into more than twenty languages worldwide. A former contributing editor of Time and senior editor of People, Andersen has also written hundreds of articles for a wide range of publications, including Life and the New York Times.
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Read an Excerpt

Sunday, August 31, 1997
12:21 A.M.

The black Mercedes S280 limousine hurtled through the streets of Paris, down the Rue Cambon and right onto the Rue de Rivoli. Only seconds had passed before it came to a screeching stop at the Rue Royale, but already a pack of photographers in cars and on motorcycles had managed to catch up, and were gunning their engines in anticipation of the chase.

Suddenly, the Mercedes carrying the Princess of Wales and her Egyptian-born lover, Dodi Fayed, jumped the light and swung left on the Place de la Concorde. The mother of the future British sovereign, trying to elude the press that hounded her every waking moment, now passed the spot where the guillotine had brought a bloody end to France's monarchy.

The limousine picked up speed as it paralleled the Seine along the Cours-la-Reine ("Queen's Course"), pressing its occupants against the backs of their plush leather seats. Approaching the Alma Tunnel, Diana could see the chestnut trees strung with twinkling white lights, and looming to the left the brightly illuminated Eiffel Tower, now counting down the number of days to the new millennium in lights forty feet high. Another motorist estimated the Mercedes's speed at 110 miles per hour. "The car was flying as it passed me," taxi driver Michel Lemmonier would later recall. "It was like the hounds of hell. There could be only one ending..."

Hitting a sharp dip at the tunnel entrance, the car was catapulted into the air, then slammed down on the surface of the roadway. Swerving wildly to the left to avoid striking a white Fiat in its path, the Mercedes clipped the compact car's bumper before Fayed's driver lost control. In an instant, the Mercedes plowed headlong into one of the eighteen concrete pillars that divided the thoroughfare. The car then spun 180 degrees counterclockwise before slamming into the tunnel wall.

Of the four people inside, only one -- Fayed's bodyguard Trevor Rees-Jones -- was wearing a seat belt. Dodi and his driver, Henri Paul, died instantly. Diana, her earrings torn away by the impact of the crash, lay on the floor behind the front seat.

Henri Paul's body leaned against the horn, sounding a shrill alarm. The tunnel filled with smoke; there was broken glass everywhere. Dr. Frédéric Mailliez, a boyish-looking thirty-six-year-old emergency physician, just happened to be driving by on his way home from a friend's birthday party. Mailliez got out of his white Ford Fiesta and rushed to the twisted wreckage of the Mercedes. "Shit!" he thought as he saw the mangled corpses of Dodi and Henri Paul.

While a volunteer fireman comforted the gravely injured Rees-Jones, Mailliez went to help the blond woman slumped in the back. He lifted Diana's head and gave her oxygen using an "Ambu" -- a French-manufactured portable oxygen mask -- but did not recognize her. "I was too busy," he later explained, "doing my job."

By now more than a dozen photographers were standing nearby, firing off flash after flash -- "like machine-gun fire," Officer Lino Gagliardone recalled. Mailliez whispered words of reassurance to Diana, first in French and then -- after photographers shouted that the woman was from England -- in English. She cried out in pain, and occasionally mumbled something, but the young doctor was too immersed in trying to save her life to stop and decipher precisely what she was saying.

Her sons could not have been far from her mind. Harry would turn thirteen in less than two weeks, and she had wanted to buy a birthday present for him in Paris. But the hordes of press that had descended on the Princess and her new boyfriend made that all but impossible. A virtual prisoner inside her suite at Paris's legendary Ritz Hotel, Diana instead dispatched a hotel staffer to purchase the Sony Playstation Harry had asked for.

Even more fresh in Diana's mind was what she regarded as her most important conversation of the day. William had called just before dinner that evening, concerned about a photo opportunity arranged by Buckingham Palace. William was about to start his third year at Eton, the exclusive prep school, and the Palace had ordered him to pose at the school for photographers from Britain's major news organizations. But he worried that such a staged event might overshadow his younger brother. "I'm just afraid Harry might feel left out," he told his mother, and she agreed. Diana promised William that as soon as she returned to London the next day, she would talk to Prince Charles and they would all come up with a plan that would spare Harry's feelings. "First thing Monday..."

Within six minutes, a rescue unit was on the scene. The mangled bodies of Dodi and Paul were extracted from the wreckage. A bright blue tarpaulin was then placed around the car to shield it from onlookers as firemen with electric chain saws cut away at what remained of the car to free Diana and Rees-Jones. As the firemen prepared to lift her from the car and place her gently on a waiting stretcher, the Princess of Wales spoke what would be her last intelligible words.

"My God," Diana asked, "what's happened?"

Six hundred miles away at Balmoral, fifteen-year-old William sat bolt upright in his bed. Exhausted from a full day spent fishing the River Dee with his father and his brother, William had buttoned up his tartan plaid pajamas and crawled beneath the covers a little before 11:30 P.M. But over the course of the next few hours, he would fall asleep only to be jolted awake again and again by a sudden, overpowering sense of dread. "I knew something was wrong," William would later say. "I kept waking up all night."

Harry, meanwhile, slept soundly in his room just down the hall...

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2006

    Too Many Un-named Sources

    After reading this book, my first thought was the number of un-named sources. Example: comments made by one of the prince's staff a footman saw this or saw that a former valet the Queen remarked members of her staff. These happen basically throughout the entire book. The occasions where the un-named sources are used is when making unfavorable comments about Diana, Princess of Wales. Next, how does the author know what Queen Elizabeth thought when the phone rang early Sunday with news of Diana's death? Or the minute details of Charles and Camilla's conversation regarding Diana's death and the effects it would have on their relationship, and the effects of Wills and Harry? Or a private conversation held between Charles and William out on the moors of Balmoral? Who talked? Who told the author? Individually, these may not seem like much but put together it makes for a little less credibility toward the author and the credibility of the material. Basically this book was not flattering toward Diana. She came out looking pitiful or mentally unstable. While Charles, the Queen, Camilla and the rest of the gang looked 'normal'. This approach seems to be a way to sneak in anti-Diana propaganda without a source being indentified. I'm suspicious. It looks like another example of pro-palace propaganda being run through the PR mill.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2004

    A Great Tribute To Diana As A Mother, and A Champion To Ease Suffering Throughout The World

    I just finished reading Diana' Boys: William and Harry and the Mother They Loved. Lots of information about the two boys. The book really highlights Princess Diana's compassionate touch. The Princess' gentle character and her desire to reach out to comfort the indigent and dying are heartwarming qualities that I most admire about the Princess. Another feather in Princess Diana's cap was the way she groomed Prince William and Prince Harry to lead from the heart and to always show compassion to those less fortunate than royalty. Princess Diana wanted her boys to take a mature look at the world around them and not be content to merely live a life were shooting birds or other game was the high point of any given day. To the dismay of the Crown, Diana was loved by the masses who responded to her warmth and her willingness to come one-on-one, hand-to-hand with the man, woman or child on the street. I was delighted this author also pointed out that red hair(inherited by Prince Harry) is a Spencer trait. After reading this book, I can understand Princess Diana's dismay when Charles hired Tiggy. With remarkable skill, the author leads the readers to agree that Tiggy was more than the 'nursery maid, guv.' What is pure fiction circulated by the Crown is that the boys were happier when they were with 'Papa' and Tiggy because there were never any photographers on hand. Well who took pictures of the young princes sitting on Tiggy's lap? Tiggy hugging the boys, etc.? Something else I find incredible is the lack of consistancy from Charles' supporters. For years Princess Diana's statements concerning Charles' affair with Camilla was dismissed as the rants of a mad, jealous and paranoid wife. This left the question as to whether Camilla was a 'real' woman or part of the Princess' imagination. We finally learn Camilla does exist but only as a 'friend'. Then Charles admits to adultery with Camilla named as his long-time mistress. We learn that Camilla's picture sits next to his bed, and that Charles has openly declared his affection for Camilla his very real mistress. Hardly surprising that Charles and his supporters' credibility is rapidly unraveling. A well-written book. I close with this thought: Perhaps Diana's Boys will hold in their hearts the lessons Diana taught them and will carry on her compassion for the suffering.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2002

    Excellent Royal Gossip!

    If you're in for some royal gossip, then this is the book for you! All about William & Harry from the day they were born to how they were told 'Mummy' died and the aftermath, Christopher Andersons sets out to enlighten you with all the juicy inside details. His style of writing is superb! Leaves you satisfied with everything you ever wanted to know about the 'heir and the spare'. Excellent Stuff!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2002

    Excellent....

    Mr. Andersen's books tug at the heart. He has a way of *drawing* the reader into the book--like NO other author! By his *vivid* details, he stays credible because he gives a full and complete picture of things and by giving ALL the facts, you the reader, can decide for YOURSELF what to think of the people involved without the usual one-sided bashing or adornment most authors give. I appreciate that! Penny Junor is so hung up on Charles that it clouds her thinking & her books are totally one-sided and she falls way short of being credible with her drivel. Not only did I cry but I literally laughed out loud when Charles took Harry to Africa and poor Harry didn't know just quite *where* to put his young eyes when the natives gave a topless dance for the Princes visit. It was very funny and Charles handled it great -- back then. Stay tuned though. I was going to say I wouldn't go so far as saying I was addicted to it--but then again--this will be my third time reading it...lol. But what gets me is I like it *more* every time I read it. You really do hate it when you come to the end of the book because YOU don't want to stop absorbing the information. I hope Andersen comes out with more books on the progress of Charles & Diana's boys through out their lives, especially with the promise Camilla made to them. Bet she wishes she could take that promise back eh? Buy the hardback book if you can. I didn't when I bought--The Day Diana Died--and wish I would have. His books are fantastic.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2001

    WONDERFUL

    This is a great book. Christopher Andersen shows the human side to some extrodinary people. I was very moved by the whole book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2001

    Couldn't Put It Down!

    When I bought this book, I thought it would be good, but I didn't expect to become addicted to it. In the 1st chapter, where it describes, in great detail I might add, about what happened when Diana's childern were told their beloved mother was dead. It was so well written, that I actually sobbed. This book describes how William and Harry were from the time they were infants, to current adventures they take. I would take this book everywhere with me. I even read it while we sat down to dinner. I finished the book in 3 days, staying up into the wee hours of the morning reading it. This book is so incredibally detailed, and so well written. When I had finsihed it I was quite sad because I had never become so entangled in a book. Bottom Line: READ THIS

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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