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Diary of a Madman
     

Diary of a Madman

4.0 5
by Ozzy Osbourne
 

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The follow-up to the masterful Blizzard of Ozz, Diary of a Madman was rushed into existence by a band desperate to finish its next album before an upcoming tour. As a result, it doesn't feel quite as fully realized -- a couple of the ballads are overly long and slow the momentum, and Randy Rhoads' guide solo on "Little Dolls" was never replaced with a

Overview

The follow-up to the masterful Blizzard of Ozz, Diary of a Madman was rushed into existence by a band desperate to finish its next album before an upcoming tour. As a result, it doesn't feel quite as fully realized -- a couple of the ballads are overly long and slow the momentum, and Randy Rhoads' guide solo on "Little Dolls" was never replaced with a version intended for the public. Yet despite the fact that some songs could have used a longer gestation period, there are numerous moments of brilliance on Diary of a Madman -- at least half of it stands up to anything on Blizzard, and the title track is a jaw-droppingly intricate epic that represents the most classically influenced work of Rhoads' all-too-brief career. But even if parts of the album don't quite live up to the band's previous (and incredibly high) standards, they're by no means bad; moreover, the production is fuller, and the instruments better recorded this time around. It's not uncommon to find fans who prefer Diary to Blizzard, since it sets an even more mystical, eerie mood, and since Rhoads' playing is progressing to an even higher level. One can only wonder what the Osbourne/Rhoads collaboration might have produced in the future, had Rhoads not been killed in a bizarre and sadly avoidable plane crash.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/20/2012
Label:
Epic
UPC:
0886978747426
catalogNumber:
787474

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Ozzy Osbourne   Primary Artist

Technical Credits

Bruce Dickinson   Producer
Ozzy Osbourne   Composer,Producer
Bob Daisley   Composer
Lee Kerslake   Composer
Max Norman   Producer
Randy Rhoads   Composer,Producer
Rob Carter   Art Direction
Jeremy Holiday   Package Manager
Sharon Osbourne   Executive Producer
Jeffrey Schulberg   Music Business Affairs
Jessica Connelly   Additional Production
Elizabeth McShea   Additional Production
Mark Neuman   Producer
Mandy Eidgah   Marketing

Customer Reviews

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Diary of a Madman 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Well, Ozzy has good lyrics and songs. All these tracks are Ozzy style! "Flying high again", "Over the Mountain" and "Believer" are very well done music. The message from Ozzy is definitely: be crazy. Diary of a Madman is the most craziest track I've Heard.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I listened to the original recording of this album until it disintigrated! All I have left is an old beat up audio cassette that I cherish like solid gold -- but it is running out of life. Who knew that in this day of remastering technology greed would destroy my hope of hearing some of the best heavy metal music ever recorded in it's original splendor! Mike Bordin's (replacement drums) rendition of Little Dolls is so pathetic that I had to turn it off half way through the song. Also, Mike Bordin's love with his symbol destroys Randy Rhoads' solo in S.A.T.O., which never failed to move me -- until now. What use to be an outstanding interplay between Randy Rhoads (lead guitar), Bob Daisly (bass), and Lee Kerslake (drums) throughout the album is now a discombobulated, unintelligible jumble. This album is the most insulting thing Ozzy could have done to Randy's memory! Hearing Randy's work, out of it's original context, diminishes the real beauty of what he did. The songs "Believer," "Tonight," "Little Dolls," and "S.A.T.O." are the worst casualties of this "remastering." I don't know what "possessed" Ozzy to cheat the artists who saved his career -- which most certainly would have been over if it were not for them. I can only hope that Ozzy will redeem himself and his respectability by releasing a remastered version of the real original! If he does not, this album will stand as an act of infamy for the ages!
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